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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XXI. 



p L Reynolds 



CHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September 22, 1910. 



No. 1 



FACULTY CHANGES 



Department Reorganized. New 
tions and New Instructors. 



Posi- 



DECISIVE VICTORY 



Since the last college year various 
changes have been made in the 
Faculty. Dean Mills, being still 
unable to resume his duties has been 
granted a year leave of absence and 
Prof. James B. Paige will continue as 
Dean for the year. The position of 
temporary Assistant Dean has been 
made permanent, and will be occu- 
pied, as last year by Mr. Mackimmie. 
Prof. C. H. Fernald has resigned 
as head of the Department of Ento- 
mology, and this has been reorganized 
as the Department of Entomology and 
Geology under Prof. C E. Gordon. 

Another new department added to 
the college this fall is that of Bee Cul- 
ture. For this department, Dr. Bur- 
ton N. Gates has been secured and 
assumes the position of assistant pro- 
fessor of Bee Culture. Professor 
Gates is a native of Worcester, a 
graduate of Clark College, A. B., 
and Clark University. He has also 
studied at Cornell, particularly bees in 
connection with biology. Since 1907 
he has been with the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture as an expert in 
Apiculture. Besides teaching at M. 
A. C. he will occupy the position of 
State inspector of apiaries. 

The college has engaged Mr. Alvah 
J. Norman for teaching and extension 
work in pomology. Mr. Norman is a 
graduate of the Iowa State College and 
has had experience as manager of a 
fruit farm in Nebraska. For a while 
he was Assistant Horticulturist at the 
Alabama Experiment Station, and for 
the past two years has been employed 
at the Maryland Agricultural college 
and Experiment Station. His engage- 
ment means that the work of teaching 
pomology at the college, and the 
orchard campaign which is being pro- 
moted throughout New England, will 
be greatly benefited. 

Dr. Henry T. Fernald has been 
appointed Acting Director of the Grad- 
uate School of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, to fill temporarily the 
vacancy caused in that position by the 
retirement of Prof. Charles H. 
Fernald. 

Mr. F. F. Moon has been secured 
as the head of the new Department of 
Forestry at the college. This position 
carries the title "Associate Professor 
of 



Class of 1913 Takes Its Ducking. Fresh- 
men Win in Quick Contest. 

The annual tug-of-way across the 
pond between the Sophomores and 
Freshmen took place last Friday and 
resulted in a victory for the class of 
1914. Sixty men were chosen from 
each class to represent the class. The 
Sophomores, had the choice of sides 
and took their place on the east side 
of the pond and waited for the Fresh- 
men to appear.' Meanwhile the Jun- 
iors had rounded up the class of '14 
on the chapel steps and a succesful 
class picture was taken before any 
body realized what was happening. 
The Freshmen then gave their yell 
and marched to the west side of the 
pond. Referee Gordon fired the 
pistol at 4-30 and the second pistol 
was fired eight minutes later; which 
announced that the last wet Sopho- 
more had passed through the pond. 
The pull may be said to be more of a 
success than last year, as it was 
shorter and no men became exhausted. 
The day was perfect and both sides of 
the pond were crowded with excited 
spectators. The Freshmen by winning 
the tug-of-way, are entitled to disylay 
their class banners in their rooms and 
on the campus. 



CLASS OF 1914 



Y. M. C. A. Reception 

The first informal social gathering 
of the year was held Friday Sept. 16, 
in the chapel, when the annual recep- 
tion was tendered to the freshmen by 
the college Young Men's Christian 
Association. The hall was decorated 
with palms, and refreshments were 
served during the evening. The first 
part of the evening was occupied by 
an informal reception by the members 
of the faculty and the ladies, after 
which the gathering was brought to a 
close by songs finally ending with 
"Sons of Old Mass'chuserts" and a 
long yell for fourteen. About 140 of 
the new men were present while the 
upper ciassmen and faculty were well 
represented. The committee in charge 
consisted of Brett 12, Baker and 
Bursley '13 



Sept 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

,24 — 3 p. m. Football Rhode 
Island State college vs.M.A.G. 
on Campus. 



Forestry," and the Department will Sept. 25—9-15 a.m. Y.M.C.A. Rally, 



be placed in the division of Horticul 
ture. 

Professor Moon received the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts at Amherst college 
in 1901 , afterwards spending two years 

[Continued on page 3.] 



Chapel. 



Largest in History of College. Twenty- 
five per cent Increase Over Last Year. 

Abbott, L. E., Sandwich 
Allbee, G. O.. Medway 
Allen, G. M., Holyoke 
Anapolsky, M.. Boston 
Anderson, L. O., Concord 
Baker, Melville, West Medford 
Bickford, H. M., East Braintree 
Bittinger, F. J., Plymouth 
Bokelund, C. Worcester 
Bragg, Ralph S., Braggville 
Brewer, W. H., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Brooks, A. W., New Bedford 
Brown, W. J., Cataumet 
Caldwell, Delmont L., Ashmont 
Calvert, M. B., New London, Ct. 
Chapon, Robert, Bangor Me. 
Childs, S. I., Sunderland 
Christie, E. W., North Adams 
Clay, Harold J., Cambridge 
Clarke, Ernest, Windsor, Ct. 
Coe, Alfred L., New York, N. Y. 
Cole, H. C, Three Rivers 
Coleman, D. A., South Framingham 
Coyne, Jas. E., South Wareham 
Culley, F. H., Marshalltown, Iowa 
Damon, Reed S., Kingston, R. I. 
Davies, L. G., Peabody 
Davis, Ralph, Southbury, Conn. 
Davis W. A., Sunderland 
Dearing, Newton D., Boston 
Demond, R. N., Stafford Springs, Ct. 
Dexter, E. K.. Mattapoisett 
Dugan, F. E., Mittineague 
Dunbar, E. W. No. Weymouth 
Dunne, R. E., New York, N. Y. 
Earle, W. W., Boston 
Edgerton, A. M., West Springfield 
Edmonds, S. W., Roslindale 
Edwards, E. C, Salem 
Elder, Arthur, Irvington, N. Y. 
Eldridge, H. L.. Wareham 
Farrar, S. K., Springfield 
Foster, S. B., West Somerville 
Freeborn, S. B., Marlboro 
Frost, Robert T., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Freedman, S. L., Roxbury 
Frye, Carl A., South Hadtey Falls 
Gare, E. J., Northampton 
Graves, B. R., Northampton 
Grebin, M. A.. North Hadley 
Gibson, D. W., Groton 
Hadfield, Harold F., North Adams 
Handy, R. E. , Cataumet 
Haskell, Willard, Greenfield 
Harriman, V. S., Brockton 
Harris, R. W., Wethersfield 
Hazen, E. L. Springfield 
Hebard, E. P., Fiskdale 
Heffron, Fred, Sherborn 
Higgins, E. W., Arlington 
Hogg, Lawrence, Lawrence 
Howard, L. P., North Easton 

Arlington 



»04. — Dr. E. A. Back has been 
appointed entomologist of the state of | Hutchinson, Jack G 
Virginia and of the Virginia Agricul 
tural Experiment Stntion. 



Hutchinson, R. E., South Hanson 

[Continued on pago 4] 



BALANCE 

Watchword for the Year. Topic 
President Butterfield's Talk. 



of 



President Butterfield addressed the 
college in assembly on Sunday morn- 
ing on the subject "Balance In Col 
lege Life." He said In brief- 
In practical experience, one great 
principle of life may be expressed by 
the word "balance." Individuals as 
well as popular movements tend to go 
to extremes. So In the individual life, 
as well as in public matters, we see 
the need of balance. 

We need balance between work and 
play and between individual interests 
and public interests. Each man must 
look out for himself but he must not 
act unmindful of other people. So we 
have today the spectacle of a great 
nation striving to find a way by which 
individual enterprise may be conserved 
and at the same time, the public as a 
whole safeguarded from aggression. 
This is the meaning of the "Insurgent" 
movement. 

We need balance in the application 
of a man's obligation to himself and 
his family on the one side, and to his 
community and his country on the 
other. This Is illustrated In war time 
when one great duty consumes all the 
energies of the man. 

We need balance between rights 
and duties. The Anglo Saxon race 
for a thousand years has been In a 
struggle to secure individual liberty. 
The coming years will see a great 
movement to lead men to do their 
duty not only by themselves, but to 
other people. 

We need balance between the spirit 
which is unfairly aggressive and the 
spirit of cowardly acquiescence In 
wrong doing. We all have to face 
these extremes now at one side, now at 
the other. 

I might illustrate in many other 
ways. If you stop to think about it, 
you will find that your best judgement 
lies largely along the line of striking a 
balance between extremes. You will 
see the need of balance, If you try to 
divide your time so as to get In many 
things that should not be neglected and 
to leave time for the chief things. 

No where is this need seen more 
fully than in college life where there 
are so many demands on time, energy, 
and thought. First of all is the Insist- 
ence of the college work, which means 
time and thought, and training and 
discipline. Then there is the demand 
of physical recreation as many other 
forms of student activities which 
require time, thought, energy and 
interest. There are the opportunities 

(Continued on pac* 5.] 






The College Signal, Tuesday, September 22, 1910. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 



HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911 
EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911. 
FRANK A. PROUTY, 1911. 
IRVING W. DAVIS, 1911. 
ALLYN P. BURSLEY, 1911. 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL, 1912, 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912. 
MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912 



, Editor-in-Chief. 
Managing Editor. 

Athletic Notes. 

Alumni Notes. 

Colleee Notes. 
Department Notes. 

College Notes. 

Collega Notes. 



that team. If you have any football 
ability at all, now is the time to show 
it. Get in and do your best for M. 
A. C. It's up to every man. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
PARK W. ALLEN, 1911, Business Manager. 

ALBERT WDODGE.l9l2.Asst. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN. Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, SEPT. 22. No. 1 



Who benefits by noon chapel ? 



With this issue, the first of the col- 
lege year of 1910-11. the Signal 
enters upon a new era. Ne\fl men are 
occupying the old places of college 
and as with every September, all 
starts anew. The classes have ad- 
vanced one cog in their turn of college 
life and at this time, it is well to 
prophesy for the coming year. The 
college has new and added members, 
its equipment Is much improved, and 
it is one year older. Its future for 
1910-1911 cannot be but bright. The 
year cannot but result in greater 
achievement than ever before attained, 
and it is with this hope and expectancy 
that the Signal starts a new year and 
extends to the personel of the college 
that prophecy which cannot help but 
come true. The year will be a bright 
one, and to be so every man must put 
his shoulder to the wheel and do his 
share. No man should avoid an 
opportunity to be of service to his 
Alma Mater and to show the true M. 
A. C. spirit. In this way only can 
the year of 1910191 1 ever reach its 
highest goal. Don't fail to find a way 
to help your Alma Mater ; nobody will 
profit more than yourself. 



The Signal takes this opportunity 
of extending a cordial welcome to the 
largest entering class in the history of 
M. A. C. It is our hope that as M. 
A. C. has profited by your coming, so 
may you profit by the four years which 
you spend here. May you never lose 
that undaunted spirit that will thrill 
your very bones whenever you hear 
the "Sons of Old Mass'chusetts." 
Get into the game early, make every 
minute count, and don't forget that 
the more you sacrifice for the college, 
the more the college will give to you. 
The college needs you, it needs the 
life and vigor which you bring to its 
gates and it Is up to every man to see 
that this life and vigor is well directed, 
that your life contains that "Balance" 
which alone brings perfection to the 
college man. It is with these thoughts 
that we welcome the class of 1914 
and urge upon its every member to be 
of service to M. A. C. 



UP -TO - DATE 



FOOTWEAR 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 22, 1910. 



PUMPS 



ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 

TENNIS SHOES 

EXPERT REPAIRING 






E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



It was noticeable last Saturday 
evening that the upperclassmen have 
as yet manifested very little interest in 
the football squad. The Freshmen 
are willing to learn songs and cheers 
but they must be taught, and that by 
the example of upperclassmen. With 
the bright outlook in football with 
Coach Gildersleeve working his hard- 
est with the men on the field, every 
player should show his interest in 
cheering on the side lines. The good 
which such enthusiasm does need not 
be emphasized here, its results will be 
seen at games on the campus and at 
Springfield. Our team has a hard 
schedule to meet, and the coach not 
too many men with which to round cut 



A CRISIS. 

A crisis of extreme importance 
presents itself to M. A. C. and requires 
immediate settlement. It is the 
enforcement of the eligibility rules 
especially as they affect the present 
football season. The rules were forced 
upon our student body with undue 
consideration, without sufficient warn- 
ing to the students, and are now being 
enforced with ludicrous inconsistency. 
A man is prohibited from making the 
football trips, actually playing on the 
teams because he has a condition, 
and should spend more time in study ; 
but this same man is excused from 
drill and permitted to practise every 
afternoon. Now if he can practise 
and actually spend his time in football, 
why should he not play in the games? 
Is this not ludicrously inconsistent? 

Now what is to become of our foot- 
ball team, our athletic standing among 
other colleges and the hope of equip- 
ping a first class athletic field? Can 
we hope to have a team if all of the 
best men are barred from playing ? 
Can we afford, by a rash act, to take 
these chances? The student body 
cannot but they did not make the rules. 
Can the administration of the college 
afford to pass over this crisis? 

An eligibility rule may be well 
I enough if enforced rightly but the pres- 
! ent rule is hardly applicable to a grow- 
ing college of less than 400 students 
and it also seems foolish to attempt to 
enforce it in such a sudden manner. 

Enough said, but it is time tor 
action. Our athletic standing is at 
stake and there is only one cure. The 
I eligibility rule must be laid aside for 
the present year. The honor of M. 
> A. C. demands it and it is hoped that 
the inventors of the rule will immedi- 
ately rectify their mistake. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



THURBER'S 

COLLEGE LUNCH 

A.MIIICWSI. 1**A*»I*. 




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DEUEL'S 



Drug Store 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
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COAL 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



THE DINING HALL SITUATION 

In view of the fact that the price of 
board at Draper Hall has apparently 
jumped from $3.75 to $4.20 per week 
since the close of the college year in 
June, it was thought best to explain 
this change to students boarding at the 
dining hall by giving a sketch of condi- 
tions as they now exist there. 

William Chesley of Bretton Woods, 
N. H. assumed the duties of manager 
and buyer at the Dining Hall on Sept. 
1st. Mr. Chesley is a graduate of St. 
Johnsbury Academy, Vt. and has 
been in the hotel business during the 
last fifteen years. Until last year Mr. 
Chesley was manager of the Mt. 
Pleasant House, Bretton Woods, N. 
H.,in the summer and of the Ormond 
House, Ormond, Fla., during the win- 
ter. Last year he was assistant 

• 

manager of Memorial Hall. Harvard 
College. So Mr. Chesley is one of the 
best men in point of experience who 
could have been secured. Mr. Ches- 
ley has not been able to superintend the 
work personally and will not be able to 
until Oct. 1st, when his engagement 
at Bretton Woods ceases. 

"But," you ask, "why should the 
price of board go up under the new 
management?" The explanation is 
this. At their annual meeting in the 
spring, the trustees passed a resolution 
to the effect that the price of board for 
the first quarter of this college year 
should be set 5^ higher than the aud- 
ited price of board for the last quarter 
of the last college year, and that at 
the end of this first quarter, board 
should again be audited and if it be 
under the set price, a rebate for the 
full amount of the difference be given 
those still boarding at the dining hall. 
Therefore, it Is not at all certain that 
the price has really gone up. 

There are a few minor changes at 
the dining hall, which might be noted. 
The kitchens have undergone much 
needed repairs, a cement floor having 
been put in and a new broiler and ket- 
tle installed. Service is practically 
the same, seconds of meat, ice cream 
and one pint of certified milk, served 
in the bottle, each being five cents, 
with seconds of desserts and sauce 
being three cents. A greater variety 
of food is now served, especially at 
breakfast and supper. A new rule for 
transients has been put into effect. 
All transients buy their tickets from 
the collector, these being taken in by 
the waiter and passed in with his 
weekly report. This insures collection 
from every transient. 

All these rules and changes are put 
into effect in order to try to solve the 
problem of good board at the lowest 
possible cost. N ow.it is not only up to 
the management, but it is to us fellows 
as well, to put down that price. We 
can waste as much in the dining hall 
in a week as the chef can save in that 
amount of time, if we start in to do it. 
But let us work together, quit our 
kicking and make the price of board 
"balance" up with the price of our 
joy rides and Informals. 
P. W. Pickard, '11 ) Dining Hall 
E. N. Boland, '12 \ Committee. 



FOOTBALL 

The football squad reported Sept. 10 
and now numbers thirty men. Daily 
practice is being held under the direc- 
tion ot Coach Gildersleeve and Capt. 
Morse. 

Captain Morse and Hayden '13 are 
not able to play at present on account 
of poor condition, but both expect to 
be In the lineup before long. The 
veterans are few, most of the candi- 
dates are from the freshman class. As 
the game is new to all it is too early 
in the season to make predictions, but 
with a large entering class to pick new 
material from, it is hoped that the 
new game will prove a success at M. 
A. C. Coach Gildersleeve has not 
yet chosen a first team and is handi- 
capped by the scarcity of line men. 
The work of the team has consisted of 
passing the ball, falling on it, punting, 
running down on kicks, tackling the 
dummy, signal practice, and scrim- 
mage. The first game of the season 
is with Rhode Island College on the 
campus Saturday, Sept. 24, and the 
coach is hustling things to get ready 
for it. 

Several of the best men will be 
kept out the game if the faculty rule 
relating to conditions is enforced. 
The decision of the faculty to enforce 
this rule, which has existed for many 
years, was so sudden and unexpected 
that in many cases there was no chance 
whatever to pass conditions be- 
fore the opening of the college. It is 
hoped that some satisfactory arrange- 
ments will be made so that the team 
not be seriously crippled. 



NEW FRATERNITY RULES 

Two permanent rules were added 
by the Fraternity Conference to the 
interfraternity rushing rules; 

1 . No fraternity or group of fra- 
ternity men shall put an unpledged 
freshman under any obligations to them 
by sheltering or by rooming with him. 

Exceptions to this rule may possibly 

be made by special permission from 

the fraternity conference, 

2. All rules shall be binding upon 
all fraternity men, both alumni and 
active members. 



FACULTY CHANGES 

[Continued from first pag«] 




at the Harvard Medical school. He 
then went into business for a time, but 
soon entered the Yale Forest school, 
and completed the course for the de- 
gree of Master of For stry, and then he 
went into the National Forest Service, 
and more recently has been employed | 
in the Department of Forestry of the 
State of New York. 



Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C students 
with the 

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the country produces. 

The Kail Styles are ready 
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We solicit your considera- 
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Sanderson 
k Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
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Tailors. 






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The College Signal, Tuesday, September 22, 1910. 



COO LEY BROS. & CO. 



CLASS OF 1914 

[Continued from first page. I 



CLOTHIERS 
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FURNISHERS 

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Call in and see our large assortment 
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decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



flOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins socts. 
25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 
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6 " dates 2Cts. pieces 5octs. 

6 " dates 3d. pieces socts. 

6 " dates nickel cents 25cts. 

25 " Broken Hank and Confederate 
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Send for my Monthly Mall Auction Circulars and 
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GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
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Inghram, E. M., Granby 

Jacobs, Loring H., 

Johnson, R. E., Templeton 

Jones, DettmarW., Melrose 

Keyes, P. P., North Amherst 

Kriebel, Addison, Norristown, Pa. 

Kilbourne, Walton G., So. Lancaster 

Leach, B. R. Methuen 

Leete, R. P., Mt. Kisco. N. Y. 

Lemoine, A. Z., Framingham 

Levine, H. W., Roxbury 

Lewis, J. K., New Haven, Ct. 

Lincoln, M. D., North Raynham 

Lucas, H. D. West Springfield 

MacHale, William, Jamaica Plain 

MacDonald, D. A., Waipole 

Mahan, Harold B., Hingham Centre 

Major, Jos. Rutherford, N.J. 

Marion, R. D., New York, N. Y . 

Matthews, A. A., Hatfield 

McNiff. Or A., Harvard 

Melloon, Ralph, Lowell 

Merkle, F. G., Amherst 

Miller, R. H., Dorchester 

Morse, Harold J., Townsend 

Morrison, H. I., Melrose 

Munroe, D. M., Huntington, N. Y. 

Murray, John K., Winthrop 

Needham, L. W., Springfield 

Nicolet, Theodore, Fall River 

Nicolet, Tell W., Fall River 

Nissen, Harry, Roslindale 

Norton, L. H., Brockton 

Oertel, John T., Scuth Hadley Falls 

Palmer, J. P., Portsmouth, N. H. 

Payne, Roland, Wakefield 

Parker, Ervine, Poquonock, Conn, 

Peters, Harry, Brown Station, N.J. 

Peterson, P. 0., Concord 

Pigeon, Carl, Boston 

Pigott, E. R., Winthrop Highlands 

Porter, B. A., Amherst 

Powers, Richard, Maiden 

Presley F. Y. Maiden 

Priest, R. A., Littleton. 

Read, F. W., Boston 

Rees, H. R., Monson 

Reid, G. A., Worcester 

Roberts, Chatles, Amherst 

Robinson, H. C, Haverhill 

Russell, Alden H., Watertown 

Sanford, C. H., Allston 

Sahr, Gabriel A., Boston 

Sexton, George P., Allston 

Shaylor, Fred P. , Lee 

Sherman, Milton, South Lincoln 

Sherman, J. P.. Hyannis 

Shirley, John W., Duxbury 

Slane, Boston 

Simmons, George W., Boston 

Small, Francis W., North Truro 

Smart, H. L., Framingham 

Smith, Leone E., Leominster 

Smith, Leon E., Brighton 

Smith. S. H., Dedham 

Spencer, R. S., West Burke, Vt. 

Stevens, A. L. , Brockton 

Stewart, George O., Somerville 

Sullivan, L. H., Melrose 

Taft, C. M., Mendon 

Taft, R. C, Oxford 

Talbot, Rolfe H., Brockton 

Tarbell, M. G., Brimfield 

Taylor, A. W., Feeding Hills 




jdbTT 



§ 



A GOOD THING 



It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3. 50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 32, 1910. 



Clapp, '12. 



Beers, '12. 



Freshmen 

Take 

Notice 

We have a full line of Banners, Lost 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain l'ens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

KASKMENT OK NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



^E. N. PARISEAU,.* 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



RAZORS HONED 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



Thurston, R. S., Everett 
Taylor, L. H., Peabody 
Tower, Alfred L., Barre 
Tsang, 0. H., Amherst 
Vener. Benjamin, Brockton 
Walker, N. K., Maiden 
Walker, R. P., Taunton 
Warner, Raymond W., Sunderland 
Weigel, A. G., Lawrence 
Wheeler, C. S., Lowell 
Wheeler, Warren G,, Dedham 
Whorf, Boston 
White, Samuel A.. Boilun 
Wing, J. D., Sjmcrville 
Whidden, Burton C, Waltham 
Whippen, GharLs W., Lynn 
Wood, H. J., Mtndon 
Wright, Frank V., Salem 
Jewett. B. D., West Newton 
Strange, Josephine P., Marshfield 
Young, Roy B., Boston 
Upton, Ernest F.. Salem 



BALANCE 

f Continued from first page.] 

of social and fraternal life, and the 
appeal of intimat- personal friendship. 
There is also the call that comes from 
a normal man's interest in the great 
world outside the college. 

So there are calls from all sides and 
in fact, so important is it that we use 
balance in college life that I am ready 
to say that it is the only way to "make 
good" in college. If a man while in 
college can learn the true sense of pro 
portion, he has learned the best lesson 
the college has to offer, so as a pr tpa 
ration for the lite b-jyond the college, 
we see the need of applying this great 
principle of balance. 

Now how may we make this apoli- 
cation. Let us get at the matter by 
suggesting some fundamental perils of 
college life today. 

First, there is the peril of the less 
important. It is the danger of con- 
suming time, money and energy for no 
serious purpose, If we are to secure 
a balance in college life we must put 
first things first. And what is the first 
business of the college man ? Class 
work is the first thing. If that were 
not true, you would not be here. You 
would not stay here if our class work 
was not efficient. I have had men say 
to me, "I have gotten more through 
the associations of college life, and 
through things outside the class-room, 
than I have through the class work 
itself. This is true in the same way 
that it is true that out in the world we 
get more out of association with men 
than we get out of books, and yet no 
student of affairs does without books, 
if this statement is given as an excuse 
for neglecting class work, it is a mis- 
chievous fallacy. For if it be true, 
why should not the college give more 
attention to these outside activities 
than to the work of the class-room ? 

Of course the man who takes no 
part in college life is also unbalanced, 
but in my experience, I have not found 
very many men of this sort. The 
facts are that there are too many men 



who are intellectually too indolent to 
excel either in work or in play. And 
that statement leads me to the second 
suggestion in the application of this 
principle of balance to the college 
life, namely; the peril of indolence. 
By this 1 mean the habit of "taking 
things easy." Business men are 
complaining of college men on this 
score. How many college men are 
there who se-m to have absolutely no 
interest in general affairs or in the 
fundamental problems of life. We 
need in our colleges more alertness of 
mind with respect to the things of the 
intellect, more ambition to excel in 
the realm of thought. We have 
swung away from the bookish idea of 
the student, and we are perilously near 
the other extreme. We need balance. 

Third, the peril of low Ideals. We 
have on one side the appeals of leisure 
of indulgence, of luxury, of the things 
that money can buy. On the other 
side we have the lack of a clear cut, 
aggressive, manly, moral, program. 
We have got to reconcile these things. 

Now college men are set apart as 
leaders. If they do not become lead- 
ers, we have wasted our time In train- 
ing them. Our leaders must under- 
stand the issue, and fight on the right 
side. Tnere is danger that our college 
graduates may take the wrong side. 
They ought not to. Our colleges must 
send out men who are masters of the 
material and yet who have a real 
religion that emohasizes services to 
fellowmen, personal puriiy, self con- 
trol and high honor. This is the old 
lesson of balance between materia' 
posperity on one side ; and on the 
other, the attempt to reach the high 
est ends of living. 

Let me conclude by making two or 
three simple statements that snm- 
marize these great perils of our college 
life, and that illustrate the need of 
balance in college life. 

1. Remember to keep first things 
first. Learn a sense of proportion. 
Keep a balance of time, and energy, 
and thought, and principle. 

2. Remember that intellectual 
curiosity, an honest mind hunger, is 
the hall mark of a educated man, of a 
college man. The desire to know, 
the will to believe, the wish to under- 
stand, the hunger and thirst for truth 
ought to dominate the spirit and the 
atmosphere of the college world. 

3. Remember that strong, noble 
character is of far greater consequence 
than knowledge or skill, and that the 

;key'.ote of the highest, strongest, most 
I lasting character, is based on the 
religious idea. Above all, do not for- 
j get that the Man of Galilee was a 
; strong, virile character; that the princi- 
ples of hope which he laid down are the 
highest tests of manhood, and that 
every college man who makes him his 
; leader puts on an armor that no man 
can possess. 

'09. — M. A. Smulyan is taking post- 
graduate work at M. A. C. 



FOR THE LAND'S SAKE 

STUDY THE PLANT FOOD PEOBLEM 



The discovery of soil bartciia, which also exist in stable manure, 

explains the advantage of comporting and cultivation lot forcing early 
growth. In tlit* majority of cases, it is no doubt cheaper, ii not better, to 
apply stable manure in its crude state directly to the soil. 10 cultivate it 
into the toil and allow the bacteria to attach it there; In abort, to com- 
port it in the soil rather than beforehand. In main rases it is desirable 

to use some thoroughly composted stable manure manure which h.is 
been subjected to the bacterial process, broken down, sad a considerable 
part of its crude plant food con verted into available forma. Tins, hot 
ever, was deemed more accessary years ago, before commercial manures 
were introduced. Now that concentrated available plant food can be 
bought, the necessity of composting manure In advance is passing out 

It is not only a slow process, but more Of less wasteful ami expensive, 

for in the pioeess of nitrification through the bacterial action a considei 

able amount of ammonia may be set liee and wasted into tbe almosph. 
This always takes place when the manure or compost pile is allowed to 
"lire fane;" and turn white. 

We try to make our Catalogues instinctive. Send lor them. 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



I. OT. LABROVITZ 



THE 



Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits iiiid Overcoats To Order 
Always a large and select line of Foreign and Domestic Woolens. 

Dyeing, Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing a Specialty 

A guaranteed lit in all the latest kinds o( garments. 

Renovated Suits Lot Sale. 

A first class line of Cent's Furnishing Goods always Of] band. h. & W. 

Collars and Dress Shirts. Satisfaction guaranteed in every transa* lion 



1 1 Amity Street, - Amherst, Mass. 

Tel. 302-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

(lass Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and (lass 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and (Jailing Cards 

WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 






The College Signal, Tuesday, September 22, 1910. 




GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

£) English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 



AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



,•.'/.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.■.•••••-•••.•••••.•.•.•.'.•.•.•.•.•••••••■•.'••••■•.•.•.■.•.•.•.'.•.•.•.•.■.■. 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine A\-/>.iinn.i; * Sf>fd,ilty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block, 



Phoenix Row 



J. H. TROTT 

Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Tel. plume JO-ia. 



SENATE RULES 

1 . As a mark of respect, all stu- 
dents are expected to recognize the 
members of the faculty by the military 
salute. 

2. That in addition the members 
of the Freshman class shall, when on 
the college grounds, recognize the 
members of the Senior class in the 
same manner until Thanksgiving 
recess. 

3. Freshmen shall not be be per- 
mitted to smoke on the college grounds 
save in their own rooms until they 
have defeated the Sophomores in some 
regular athletic contest. 

4. Students are expected to dress 
neatly and decently at all times and 
no student shall be permitted to 
appear on the campus during an ath- 
letic contest, or at the Dining Hall, or 
at any college exercise clad in overalls, 
jumpers, or similar unconventional 
attire. 

5. Military uniforms or portions of 
the same shall not be worn by 
individuals outside the college grounds, 
except to or from drill. 

6. Shcuid the Freshman class 
lose the Twj-of-Wa<- the Sophomore 
class shall be at liberty to confiscate 
all Freshman class banners displayed 
by that cl ass either in their rooms or 
on the campus during their Freshman 
year at college. 

7. No student shall wear any 
preparatory school insignia, letters, or 
numerals either on caps, jerseys or 
sweaters while en the campus. 

8. Between Sept. 16 and Christ- 
mas vacation, inclusive. Freshmen 
shall appear at all times while in the 
limits of the town of Amherst wearing 
the prescribed Freshman cap. Y\v- 
said cap to consist of a black skull 
cap with a 1 1-2 inch green button. 

Announcment of Freshman banquet 
rules to be made later. 

H. W. Blaney, President. 
A. C. Brett, Secretary. 



9. The signal for the start shall 
be a gun or pistol shot. 

10. No holes shall be dug before 
the shot is fired, and then only with 
the heels. No material save rosin shall 
be used on the rope, and no cleats 
shall be worn. 

1 1 . The officials shall be the re- 
feree, the members of the Senat3, 
and such others as the President of 
the Senate shall see fit to appoint. 

12. Only officials shall be allowed 
inside of the ropes. 

13. The rope shall be permanent 
and shall be kept by the College Sen- 
ate. 



TIME LIMITS FOR ATHLETIC 
CONTESTS 

In view of the fact that in the past 
much trouble has arisen from vague 
and unsatisfactory time limits for the 
various athletic contests between the 
Sophomore and Freshman classes, 
the College Senate has appointed the 
following time limits for these events. 

Six man rope-pull— Between one 
week from the opening of college and 
Oct. 15, inclusive 

Football — Between the close of the 
varsity season, and the second Satur- 
day after Thanksgiving, inclusive. 

Basketball — During the month of 
January. 

Hockey — At such time as the Sen- 
ate may direct. Twenty-four hours 
notice will be given. 

Baseball — During Commencement 
week. 



STEAM PITTING, Telephone 59— 4. 

GAS PITTING, l INNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

A Specialty of Repairing 

Ciiukcu Windows, 

Memorial Windows, 

Lkad Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 

FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 
Inquire 

W. R. BROWN 

Savings Bank Hl'k, 
Amherst, • - - Mass. 



E. B DICKINSON D.D.S. 

D0NTAL ROOM! 
Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

( >1 IK I lloi'HS: 
etOlS ^V. .VI. l.SJOto«l'.M. 



TUG-OF WAR RULES. 

1 . The tug-of-war shall take place 



Etbcf and Nitrous Oxide ('.as admin- 
stered when desired 



Olympia Candy Go. 



257 Main* St., 
Northampton, 



Mass. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



on the first Friday afternoon after col- 
lege opens in September. 

2. The rope shall be 800 feet 
long and 1 1-4 inches in diameter. 

3. The number on each side 
shall be 60 men. 

4. Each number one man shall 
be on the rope thirty feet from the 
edge of the pond. 

5. The Sophomores shall have 
choice of sides of the pond. 

6. The Senate shall choose the 
referee. 

7. The class that pulls the whole 
length of its opponents rope across 
the pond shall be declared the winner 
of the contest. There shall be no 
draw. 

8. Dropping on the rope shall 
not be albwed. Contestants sitting or 
lying on the rope during the contest 
shall be taken off. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

ENTOMOLOCY AND ZOOLOGY. 

During the summer months a great 
many changes and repairs have been 
made on the buildings about the cam- 
pus. The new entomological building, 
the largest and most ornamental struc- 
ture on the grounds, is fast nearing 
completion. It will be devoted partly 
to Entomology under the direction of 
Dr. H.T. Fernald and partly to Zoology 
and Geology under the direction of Pro- 
fessor Gordon, who has been appointed 
head of the department of Zoology and 
Geology. The equipments of the old 
Entomological building and of the 
Zoological department in the north 
i wing of South College have already 
been moved to the new quarters. 

MATHEMATICS. 

A portion of the old Entomological 
building is to be devoted to the teach- 
ing of draughting. A suitable and 
well-lighted draughting room is being 
furnished with a complete equipment 
of drawing tables. The office of the 
Mathematical department will be 
located in this building. Professor 
Hasbrouck is back after a year's leave 
and will teach freshman algebra, 
geometry, and trigonometry and soph- 
omore physics. Stack '12 will act as 
assistant instructor in the physical 
laboratory. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 22, 1910. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemunis 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE -300 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only J torn 1 A. M. to 4 A. Af. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amhkkst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney 'io, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt '10 for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



REPAIRS. 

The recitation room on the second 
floor of the drill hall has been cut up 
into offices that are to be occupied by 
Captain Martin, commandant of the 
battalion, and by Dr. Reynolds, the 
director of physical education. Some 
new hard wood has been put into por- 
tions of the drill hall floor and the 
armory has been enlarged and fur- 
nished with a number of new gun 
racks. At the heating and lighting 
station the old flooring in the machine 
shop has been replaced by a new 
cement floor; and at Draper Hall 
numerous repairs have been made in 
the basement. The house formerly 
occupied by Professor Brooks is under- 
going extensive repairs and alterations 
and, on completion, will be occupied by 
President Butterfield. 



THE tl. L FROST & BARRETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 

STAMFORD, CONN. 




THOMAS 
PHOSPHATE POWDER 



BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE) 



ALUMNI NOTES 

79.— Prof. L. B. Green, d^an of 
the School of Forestry of tne Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, died suddenly of 
apoplexy July II, 1910. 

"Professor Green was born in Chel- 
sea, Sept. 15, 1859. He was the 
son of Thomas and Anna E. Green. 
He was graduated from the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural college in 1879. 
He later made special studies of horti- 
culture and forestry. He was married 
at Wellesley Hills, in 1887 to Alice 
C. Hazelton. Professor Green was 
elected secretary of the Minnesota 
Horticulture Society in 1890. In 1888 
he was associate editor of the Farm 
and Fireside magazine. He studied 
horticulture and forestry in Germany, 
Denmark, Holland, Belgium, France 
and England in 1900, on leave 01 
absence from the University of Min 
nesota. Professor Green was author 
of 'Amateur Fruit Growing,' 'Vege- 
table Gardening,' and 'Forestry in 
Minnesota.' These are now used as 
text books in the state agricultural 
college. He has also written numer- 
ous university bulletins on agriculture 
and forestry topics." — Minneapolis 
Morning Tribune.- 

'08. — Married in Worcester, Sept. 
14, E. W. Bailey and Miss Edith A. 
Bullock. At home after Oct. 25 at 
100 Clarkson Ave., Champaign, 111. 

'08. — Lloyd Chapman has been east 
this summer visiting relatives. 

'08. — H. M. Jennison, Instructor 
in Botany at Wabash college. Ad- 
dress 419 West Wabash Ave., Craw- 
fordsville, Ind. 

Among the alumni who have visited 
College since June are Halligan '00, 
Knight '02, Tottingham '03, Racicot 
ex. '06, Cardin, Corbett, Geer W. E., 
Lindblad, Putnam, Phelps and Webb 
'09, Cowles and Damon '10. 

The following 1910 men have been 
heard from : 

Armstrong, Assistant Horticulturist, 
Vermont Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, Burlington, Vt. 

Bailey, D. E., Assistant Chemist, 



SPEAKS FOR ITSELF! 

At the Great Fruit Show held at Boston, Mass., 
October i«s 24, 1909, fruit grown on Thomas Phos 
phate Powder, (Basic Slag Phosphate) took Nine 
Firs! Premiums, Two Second Premiums, Four 
Third Premiums, including a Silver Cup and a 
Silver Medal. This fruit was raised by Mr. 
George A- Drew, of Connecticut, M. A, C, Class 
of 1897. (Our pamphlet ** Up To 1 >at< - Fruit Grow- 
ing" is sent free if you mention Tkt College Signal.) 

The Coe-Mortimer Co.. 

24-26 STONE STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 

We also distribute from Boston, Mane- Belfast, Me. Baltimore, 
Md., Wilmington, N.C., Savannah, <>a., and Charleston, S.C. 

_A "TRY 

THOMPSON THOMPSON" 



s^s^s^Lfss^s^ssiS^s^. 



Kl \l( Of I III. PIKS I \ VI IONAI HANK 



Bicycles, Guns, Typewriters, etc., 
for rent. 



Rare bargains now on our floor. 
New and second hand INDIANS. 



■s^nsz*ns%nsiszs 





Typewriters for sale and for rent. 
If you already have a typewriter I 
will accept it as part payment on a 
new one«or furnish you a new Rib- 
bon and put it in first class shape. 

If you have lost a key or 
need a new lock on your door 
or trunk, come right along. 

We are waiting for you. 



Burn the midnight electricity. 
It is more cleanly than oil. We 
have a fine line of Flexo Lamps 
and odd electric fittings. Study 
would be a pleasure instead of a 
drudgery if you use one of these 
Flexo Lamps. 



Repairs of Automobiles, Bicycles, 
Cameras, Desks, Electric Fixtures, 
Guns and so on to the end of the 
alphabet. "Any old thing except 
Umbrellas. 




Guaranteed Tennis, 
Football, Hockey Goods. 
Guns and Amunition. 



>? i 









8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 22, 1910. 



South Dakota Experiment Statiion, 
Brookings, S. D. 

Bailey, J. C. Wareham. 
Beeman, Farmer, Box 122, Ware. 
Blaney, with Storrs, Harrison 
Nursery Co. Painesville, Ohio. 

Brandt, Landscape Architect, 75 
North 17th St., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Brooks, H. A., with Baltimore & 
Ohio Railroad. Has been very ill 
with typhoid fever but has returned to 
his home in Cleveland, O. 

Brooks, S. Ci Assistant Botanist 
Massachusetts Experiment Station, 
Amherst. 

Burke, Instructor in Agriculture and 
Chemistry in Mora high school, Mora, 
Minn. 

Clarke, Fruit growing. Milton-on- 
Hudson, N. Y. 

Cowles, School Supervisor, Porto 
Rico. 

Damon, Post Graduate work in the 
University of Wisconsin. 

Dickinson, Landscape Architect, 6 
Beacon St., Boston. 

Everson, Chemist with American 
Agricultural Chemical Co., Chrome, 
N. J. 

Fisk, School Supervisor, Philippine 
Islands. 

Folsom, Fruit and Poultry, Billerica. 

Francis, Landscape Architect, Cove, 
Minn. 

French, Assistant State Entomolo- 
gist of Rhode Island, 109 Broadway, 
Pawtucket, R. I. 

Haynes, Fruit and general farming. 
Sturbridge. 

Hayward, General farming, Millbury. 

Holland, Fruit Grower, Shrewsbury. 

Hosmer, Civil engineer, Turners 
Falls. 

Johnson, with Col. Mortimer Co,, 
Moosic, Penn. 

McLaine, Post-graduate at M.A.C. 

Mendum. Farming, Gill. 

Nickless, Farming. Billerica. 

Partridge, Assistant in Agriculture, 
Kame'nameha Schools Hawaii Islands. 

Schermerhorn, Assistant in Horti- 
culture, Montana Agricultural College, 
Bozeman, Mont. 

Thomas, post-graduate student 
M. A. C. 

Turner, Sub-master Colebrook High 
School, Colebrook, N. H. 

Urban, with American Agricultural 
Chemical Co.. Carteret, N.J. 

Vinton, Herdsman, Middlebrook 
Ferry, Dover, N. H. 

Waldron, Instructor in Botany Penn- 
sylvania State College, State College, 
Pa. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Has started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 

FORESTRY, 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course is open to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford I splendid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

Kknyon L. lii iTKkHKi.u, President. 



Allen Bros. 

Contractors & Builders. 
Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

N neteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Public Speaking Council, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Literary Monthly, 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



Herbert W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

Leon E. Faegerstrom, Jr., Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heatd, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill, President 

D. E. Bailey, President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

H. F. Willard. Manager 



AMHERST. MASS. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner scat. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyking, and Rkpairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 

No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lkw and C. K. Rohkrts. 



CARS 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Leave AGOIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST lor AUCIIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mim. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Can at Reasonable Rates 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. BY. CO 



WANTED — Cosmopolitan Magazine re 
quires the services of a represettative in 
Massachusetts Agricultural College to look 
after subscriptions, renewals and to extend 
circulation by special methods which have 
proved unusually successful. Saiary and 
commission. Previous experience desira- 
ble but not essential. Whole time or spare 
time. Address, with reference, H. C. 
Campbell, Cosmopolitan Magazine, 1789 
Broadway. New York City. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



M 



Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Springfield Republican 

[MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, %2. Weekly, $/. 



THE COLLEGE 




sm 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



V 



I. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September 27, 1910. 



No. 2 



FOOTBALL 



First Game Brings Out Some New Ma- 
terial. New Rules Make Game More 
Difficult for Players and Officials. 

Our football team had its first 
chance to try out the new game on 
the campus last Saturday, with George 
Cobb's team from Rhode Island. 
Neither side scored, fast playing was 
impossible by a wet field. 

Rhode Island kicked off to Gore, 
who ran the ball back fifty yards. Our 
men were unable to gain much ground 
in the scrimmage, but throughout the 
game they handled the punts well. 
The trick plays that the team has been 
practicing were abandoned and the 
old style formations were used. Our 
opponents showed ability with their de- 
layed passes and made first down time 
after time through the line. 

Our goal was threatened but once, 
in the last period of the game, when 
by end runs and line bucks the Rhode 
Island men reached our fifteen yard 
line, with but three yards to go to make 
first down. With nine "hold'ems" 
from the side lines, our team rallied 
and held like a stone wall. The ball 
chanffft ciri*»« anH rinodnoueh punted 
it out of danger. 

There were several penalties on each 
side, occasioned by the new rules and 
time was often taken out so that the 
rule book could be consulted. The 
work of the officials was unsatisfac- 
tory, their knowledge of the rules 
seemed to be limited, the players 
themselves showing more intelligence 
in that respect. Walker '12 acted as 
captain and held his own when It came 
to disputes as well as in coaching and 
directing the team. Goodnough did 
the punting and got the ball away 
safely every time. Gore as quarter- 
back used his head well and showed 
his ability in running back punts. The 
left side of the line was weak and it 
was through here that our opponents 
gained most of their ground. Larsen 
and Lane each played a star game at 
end and broke up most of the end runs. 
As a whole the team showed its lack 
of practicing together. As it was not 
until the last minute that the coach 
knew what players were eligible, a first 
team had not been decided on. No 
forward passes were used on either 
side, 

Rhode Island's work was snappy and 
their blocking-was perfect. Sullivan, 



RUSHING RULES 

Rules for Rushing New Men Adopted 
by Interfraternity Conference. 

1. No candidates for fraternity mem- 
bership shall be spoken to nor shown 
literature pertaining to. or approached 
in any manner whatsoever in regard to 
fraternities or fraternity membership 
until after the chapel exercises on the 
second Tuesday after the Thanksgiving 

recess. 

2. No candidate for fraternity 
membership shall be spoken to about, 
nor shown literature pertaining to, nor 
approached in any manner whatsoever 
in regard to fraternities or fraternity 
membership after six o'clock p. m., 



THE NEW BUILDING 

For Pomology and Market Gardening. 
Adequate Quarters for Both Depart- 
ments. Work Already Begun. 

The last legislature appropriated 
$12,000 for a laboratory and storage 
building for Pomology and Market 
Gardening, something which has long 
been needed in these two departments. 
While both departments will be located 
in the one building there will be abso- 
lutely no means of communication 
between the two sections except one 
insulated door so that no one need 
fear that the onions and apples will 
contaminate eich other. 

The section devoted to Pomology 



COLLEGE SINGING 



"hursday of the same week, and no | consists, on the ground floor, of one 
fraternity man shall be with him from I large room for class work and three 



that time until after chapel of the fol 
lowing morning. 

3. The wearing of a fraternity pin. 
or pledge emblem by a candidate shall 
signify that the bearer is pledged to 
that fraternity. The pin, or pledge 
emblem shail be voluntarily put on by 
the candidate himself during chapel 
exercises of the following morning. 
(Any verbal or written promise shall 
not be valid.) 



storage rooms. The class-room will 
be used for all such work as packing 
fruit, grafting, examination of spray 
apparatus, etc. A room of this size 
will make It possible to give every stu- 
dent room enough to work comfortably. 
Alumni who remember the practicums 
in apple packing with a class of twenty 
to thirty crowded Into the old tool- 
room and work-shop will appreciate 
what this new building is going to 



4. No candidate shall be taKen out mean to the men taking Commercial 



of town during the above mentioned 
"working" season, and no fraternity 
man shall associate with such candi- 
date while out of town during the afore- 
said season. 

5. No prepared spead, banquet, 
entertainment, etc., shall be given to 
a candidate by any fraternity or group 
of fraternity men during the "work- 
ing"' season, and no fraternity or group 
of fraternity men shall give a prepared 
entertainment spread or banquet prior 
to the "working" season. 

6. If a candidate is not pledged at 
this time he is not eligible for mem- 
ship to any fraternity until May first of 
the same year, except by special 
arrangements of the Fraternity Con- 
ference. 

7. Special students shall not be 
considered eligible as candidates for 
fraternity membership. 

8. No fraternity or group of frater- 



Pomology in the future. Adjoining 
this packing room is a large frost- 
proof room (for the storage of such 
fruits as apples which do not need arti- 
ficial cooling for holding a short time), 
and two refrigerated rooms each with 
its separate cooling apparatus so that 
different temperatures may be main- 
tained for different fruits. This will 
mean that such perishable fruits as 
plums, peaches and grapes, which In 
the past it has been practically Impos- 
sible to hold until college opened, can 
hereafter be had in abundance for 
class use. 

On the floor above will be abundant 
room for the storage of barrels, boxes, 
baskets, etc. and In the basement are 
two more rooms which will be used for 
general storage purposes. 

The Vegetable Gardening section is 
designed more for experimental work 
than for class purposes, though mod- 



nity men shall put an unpledged fresh- erate sized classes can be accommo 



man under any obligations to them by 
sheltering or by rooming with him. 
Exceptions to this rule may possibly 



dated. There is a central work-room 
for packing, etc. At one side of this 
is a squash room, which may be 



be made by special permission of the j heated, in which experiments will be 
fraternity conference. carried on in storing squash, a matter 

9. These rules shall be binding which vegetable gardeners agree needs 



MICH LHUlySVIIIg woo p\.ii<-\*», _u. •••»■■, ,. -- - - 

their quarter back generaled his team j upon all fraternity men. both alumni thorough Investigate. On the oppo- 



site side of the work-room is a corridor 
from which open four refrigerated 



well, and was active in dodging and and active members 

carrying the ball. Owing to the poor ; asaaHMU. 

weather conditions the real strength! At a recent meeting of the faculty, compartments, each having a separate 
of neither team could be judged, but the ru | e pertaining to inellgibles was ; cooling system. 

... ... ..__ fr\r *>yn*»rimftnfj 



in the total yards gained the visitors 



[Continued on p*c* *1 



suspended until further definite action 
could be taken 



for experimental work in the storage 

( Continued o« ptc* B J 



Improvement in Singing Expected Un- 
der Prof. Simmons' Instruction. 
Glee Cluh Plans for the Season. 

Last Friday's chapel exercises were 
in charge of Mr. Sumner of Worces- 
ter, who has been secured to Instruct 
the student body In singing their col- 
lege songs and the chapel hymns and 
to coach the glee club. Every Friday 
the chapel exercises will be turned over 
to him and will be conducted as a 
practicing recital. Mr. Sumner's 
personality is already felt by the men 
and already an Improvement In the 
singing is noted. 

It Is planned that every student will 
have his voice examined and that the 
student body will be seated according 
to parts. Our college songs are now 
sung In such a way that a great part of 
the effect Is lost, a majority sing the 
melody and a few mingle a little tenor 
and bass, each one making up his part 
to suit himself and no attempt Is made 
to get the different parts together. In 
the near future all the familiar tunes 
will be harmonized and arranged for 
male voices. This will add much to 
the mass singing, and will make the 
songs available for use in the glee 
club In the afternoon and club singing 
that must be of credit to the colhge 
will be the result. Until last year 
the college had not been represented 
by a glee club for a long time. In 
December It was fairly started under 
way and several trips to nelgeborlng 
towns were taken with moderate 
success. All of the old club Is back 
and with this as a nucleus, the pros- 
pects are very bright for the season of 
1910-1911. 

A call for candidates was Issued last 
week and some very promising mate- 
rial found In the freshman class. 
The club will consist of about thirty 
members to start with, but will prob- 
ably be reduced to sixteen or twenty 
before the year is over. Two rehear- 
sals will be held each week before the 
meeting with Instructor on Friday. 
Besides this the glee club will act as 
a choir at dally chapel, and will be 
arranged as two choirs of sixteen men 
each on opposite sides of the platform 
and facing each other. This will 
serve the double purpose of leading the 
student singing and of providing a daily 
rehearsal for the glee club. 

The schedule will consist, as last 
year, of concerts in some of the small 
towns and later some longer trips will 
be taken. Attendance to rehearsals 
j as well as quality of singing will be 
taken Into consideration when the final 
selection is made. The men that 



I 



[CMttnu*lonp«c«4.) 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 27, 1910. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, Editor-in-Chief. 

HARRY F. WILLARD, 1911. Managing Editor. 

FRANK A. PROUTY, 1911. Athletic Notes. 

IRVING W. DAVIS, 1911, Alumni Notes. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY, 1911. College Notes. 
ROYALN.HALLOWELL.1912, Department Noter 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912, College Note*. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT, 1912. College Notes. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALLEN, 1911, Business Manager. 

ALBERT W.DODGE. 1 9 1 2, Asst. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG, Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN, Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Pert Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, SEPT. 27. No. 2 

This issue of the Signal goes to 
press under a board of senior editors, 
who are, with one exception, inex- 
perienced in their positions. It is with 
misgivings that they enter upon their 
duties, which for them are surrounded 
with a certain amount of uncertainty 
because of their limited knowledge 
and doubts concerning their abilities. 
The board was indeed sorry to be 
forced to acccept the resignation of 
the editor-in-chief, for it was evident 
that no one so capable and so well 
suited for the position was available. 
The board wishes to extend an expres- 
sion of appreciation for his services. 



To have spirit at its height for the 
Springfield game is very desirable but 
what is to prevent having some genu- 
ine enthusiasm now. The earlier we 
start the better prepared we will be. 
The upper classmen should attend the 
mass meetings in full force, for theirs 
is the responsibility of teaching the 
songs and cheers to the freshmen; 
while the duty of the lower classmen 
is to learn and to do their part in mak- 
ing a better showing in cheering. So 
come out on the side lines after drill 
and if a mass-meeting is held be 
present and get into the spirit. 



are especially pronounced at that time. 
Until the meal hour was changed the 
dlning-hall waiters could not secure 
their dinner before serving their tables 
and the idea of eating after working is 
surely impractical. Serving a later 
meal now makes it difficult for the 
waiters and impossible for some dining 
hall employees to get to recitations on 
time in the afternoon. Doesn't it 
seem that the most logical solution is 
to have chaoel at the opening of the 
school day? 



After a trial of a week and a half, 
noon chapel appears out of place. It 
would seem that the objects of chapel 
exercises were to give a start for the 
day, to enthuse a spirit less mechan- 
ical than the unbroken routine of study 
brings, and to afford a place of an- 
nouncements for both faculty and stu- 
dents. Such a common meeting 
place is especially desirable for the 
publishing of the day's happenings, but 
why shouldn't it come at the opening 
of the day? Noon chapel, hitched on 
the end of four class hours, gives no 
incentive for better work because the 
exercises come in the middle instead 
of at the beginning of the day, and 
because the cravings of the inner man 



COLLLGE NOTES 

The senate has appointed G. P. 
Nickerson and C. A. Smith '1 1 cheer- 
leaders. 

C. H. White recently met the chair- 
men of the Y. M. C. A. to discuss 
plans for the coming year. 

The C. S. C. fraternity has taken 
up its quarters in the house bought last 
spring at No. 85 Pleasant St. 

The student members of the dining 
hall committee for this year are P. W. 
Pickard 'II and E. N. Boland '12. 

The house on the "hill" formerly 
occupied by Prof. W. P. Brooks is 
being repaired for President Butter- 
field. 

An accurate survey of the land 
bought this summer for the athletic 
field is now being made in preparation 
for laying out the field. 

The class of 1912 has elected the 
following officers for this semester: 
President, C. C. Pearson; vice-presi- 
dent, Jesse Carpenter, Jr. ; secretary 
and treasurer; sergeant-at-arms, C. 
E. Whitney; and historian, E. B. 
Young. 

The Informal Committee, appointed 
by the Fraternity Conference, is com- 
posed of the following men: E. A. 
Larrabee, chairman; E. M. Brown, 
secretary and treasurer; N. H, Hill, 
J. E. Dudley, Jr., H. W. Blaney. L. 
M. Johnson, G. W. Ells and C. L. 
Beals. 

Because of the large number of 
freshmen there will be two battalions 
of three companies each in the mili- 
tary department. S. R. Parsons will 
command the first and A. P. Bursley 
the second battalion. E. A. Larrabee 
has been promoted to the captaincy of 
Company C, and H. H. Howe will 
command Company F, the t.ew 
company. 

Owing to the resignation of H. W. 
Blaney and P. W. Pickard from the 
Signal Board, I. W. Davis, A. P. 
Bursley, and H. F. Willard have been 
appointed to the Board. E. M. 
Brown will succeed H. W. Blaney as 
editor-in chief. Willard will have the 
position of managing editor. Davis 
will look after the department of 
Alumni Notes and Bursley will have 
charge of the competition for elections 
to the board. 



UI' -TO - DATE 



FOOTWEAR 



PUMPS 



ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 



TENNIS SHOES 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of ( 'allege Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 




I I 



.. Cigars 



5c. and 10c. 

BRANDS 



THURBER'S 

COLLEGE LUNCH 



WIIIDKSI. 2VI .VMM. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
ot 



DEUEUS 



'87.— C. L. Marshall, Supt. 
Lodge Gardens, Dedham. 



Green 



Drug Store 



CAP & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from tlie At- 
lantic to the l'acific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



The Prospect House 

Good Board and 
Clean, Airy Rooms 

MRS. E. E. PERRY 

There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



LET'S HAVF A POST OFFICE 
For some time the facilities at M. 
A. C. for distributing mail have not 
been nearly up to the standard by 
any means and the continually increas- 
ing number of students in the college 
makes this fact more and more evi- 
dent. At present all mail is taken to 
the old broken box in North College 
and dumped there for the students to 
pick out as they can. Not infrequently 
pieces of mail are bst and remarks 
are often heard around college deplor- 
ing the present unsatisfactory mall de- 
livery. Besides this the post office is 
really doing what it ought not to in 
leaving mail in such a place. What 
we want is a small room In the Union 
Hall or some other suitable place on 
the campus where we can have uur 
own lock boxes and call boxes and the 
safe delivery of mail can be assured. 
Perhaps an appropriation could be had 
from the college to pay a student for 
his time to distribute the mail in the 
boxes. The post office in the center 
is willing to cooperate with the college 
in any way possible. 

The present'two mails a day schedule 
is also unsatisfactory. Many students 
are over on the hill at classes when the 
mail comes and do not get their mail 
till noon. Some of this could be had 
early in the morning. Also the ni<;ht 
mails could be brought up and distri- 
buted in the boxes. We could at least 
have three mails a day instead of two. 
It is hoped that something may be 
done before many dayb to give uo a 
distributing office at M. A. C. 



BIBLE STUDY AND MISSION 

STUDY COURSES FOR 

NEXT YEAR 

The Bible Study and Mission Study 
courses for this year will begin Oct. 
2nd. Each course in Bible Study will 
continue for twenty lessons. The 
Mission Study courses will consist of 
only eight lessons. 

Some of the strongest men on the 
faculty have been secured as leaders, 
and this year promises to be the ban- 
ner year in Bible Study and Mission 
Study at M. A. C. 

The following courses are offered: 

BIBLE STUDY. 

Seniors — Old Testament Heroes. 
Leaaer, Professor Hart. 

Juniors Social Teachings of Jesus. 
Leader, Professor Eyerly. 

Sophomores— Life of St. Paul. 
Leader, Professor White. 

Freshmen- Three Lessons in Col- 
lege Problems followed by The Life ot 
Christ, Leaders, Professor McKay, 
Wales 1912, Madison 1912. 

NoTB-ProfeMor McKay's course will consist of 
Tie Life of Christ only and will be open to all cl«se». 

MISSION STUDY. 

Course I— The Unfinished Task. 
Leader, Baker 1911. 

Course II— -Dawn on the Hills of 
Tang. Leader, Professor McKay. 

Course III— City Problems. Lead- 
er, Dr. Cance. 

Note— Course begins after Christmas. 



Y. M. C. A. RALLY 

The Sunday morning meeting took 
the form of a Y. M. C. A. rally, lead 
by Mr. Beatty of Springfield. His 
talk was essentially as follows: 

"Williams," "Pink pills for pale 
people," "Colgates," etc. These 
words are continually before us. 
Trade marks are much used today to 
keep the articles before the people. 
Sign boards are erected along our rail- 
road tracks and great sums of money 
are spent for advertising. There are 
good reasons why this Is Important. 
But there is another fellow who has as 
plain a trade mark. The devils trade 
mark "No harm there," is seen every- 
where. In the first place the devil 
puts pictures in the cigarette boxes. 
Surely there is no harm in that ; but 
there is an odor about these pictures 
to which the small boy becomes 
accustomed so that when later, tempta- 
tion comes to him he falls an easy 
victim to the smoking habit. There 
is no harm in taking a friendly glass 
even if it be only ginger ale. But a 
fellow who becomes accustomed to 
these things falls more easily before 
the temptation to drink. We pride 
ourselves on our self-control, but we 
are not as strong as we think and we 
should not puj ourselves unnecessarily 
into temptation. There is no harm in 
stealing a few watermelons or apples, 
but later we want something greater, 
we help ourselves and finally get into 
trouble. A school boy friend of mine 
once found a book that had been iost. 
Bill took the book and sold it. After 
a time Bill was sent to a reformatory 
for stealing books from the school and 
sel ing them. A young man once 
entered a co-educational college and in 
the natural course of events he learned 
to dance and attended the school 
dances. No harm in that. One day 
he had an invitation to attend a dance 
of the lower class and because he had 
become accustomed to dancing he 
accepted and this was his first stept in 
the downward way. It is very easy 
for a fellow to drop out of religious 
work and discontinue church attend- 
ance. This was my experience in col- 
lege and the way I warded off this 
tendency was by engaging actively In 
Christian work. Each man of today 
must safeguard his own life. The girls 
of today are demanding Christian hus- 
bands and the reason for this is that 
doctors tell us that QO}, of the young 
men in our cities are unfit to marry. 
Nothing will help you so much as doing 
some kind of Christian work. Take 
up your special line whether it be sing- 
ing in the choir or teaching a mission 
class. Confide in your pastor and 
president. 

The true way to test a contemplated 
action is "Is there good in it" This is 
the only practical way. It is the test 
you apply to any position that is offered 
you, why should you not put this same 
test to all your actions. What we 
need is a little service. Regard for 
success in service is, more work to do. 
Don't put the devil's test "No harm 
in it" to your work but rather use 
i Christ's method "Is there good in it." 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store fol 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our r ca d faca i 
to serve the If. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

■the country produces. 

The Fall Stylt-s are ready 
MM! every price is I phasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



C&rp*n-ter St Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



_ OF 




I Himiie 



TOBAOGO 



A r 



ALL OF 11 IK 

VARSITY MEN 

ami most ol the upsCN lassincti 
wear 

DUDLEY 

// \.\l> KM I 

Shaker Sweaters 

"THERE IS A REASON." 



The College Drug Store 



EDWARD I-. HAZEN, '14 



A I ,1 N I FOR 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



vi M. \. < 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 27, 19 10. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 27, 1910. 



COOLEY BROS. & CO. 



FOOTBALL 

[Continued from first p»gel 



CLOTHIERS 

HATTERS 

FURNISHERS 



HART, SCHAFFNER <* MARX SUITS 



WESTFIELD, 



MASS. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



were superior. Next Saturday the 
team goes to Dartmouth, and as it has 
already been initiated in the new style 
of play a better showing is expected. 
The line-up: — 

M. A. C R- I. S. 

Lane. 1 e re. Angilly 

Sampson, It rt. Warner 

McGarr, Sheehan, 1 g. r g. Ahrens 

Robinson. Johnson, c c. Harris 

Walker, r g 1 g. Patterson 

Powers, Hayden. r| It Minor 

Larsen. re 1 e. Davis 

Gore, q b q b. Sullivan 

Williams. 1 h b r h b. Briden 

Goodnough, r h b 1 hb. Doll, Webb 

Moreau, f b f b, Sherwin 

Score, M. A. C. 0, R. I. S. 0. Referee, 
Dr. Collins of Northampton. Umpire, 
Bateys of Brown. Field judge, Foley of 
Amherst. Linesmen. Newton of R. I. S., 
Pearscn of M. A. C. Four seven-minute 
periods. 



COLLEGE SINGING 

[Continued from first pase.l 



AND 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



M. D. OILMAN. C. A. MOKFKT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to ail Main Strkbt. 

Worcester, Mass. 



have been chosen so far, are as follows : 
First tenor — French. Hasey, Pease 
'13, Melloon and Mahan '14; second 
tenor— Willard and F, A. Prouty '11, 
Hills and Castle '12. Zabriskie '13, 
Wood and R. P. Walker '14; first 
bass — Nickerson and C. A. Smith 'II, 
Brett and Walker '12, Griggs and 
Cobb '13 ; second bass — Ells and Gel- 
inas '12, Clegg and Barstow '13, G. 
F, Albee, March, H. D. Brown and 
Gibson "14. 




A GOOD THING 



It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
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Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



Clapp, '12. 



Beers, '12. 



H. W. FIELD 

... FtORIS* ... 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



OPP. ACADEMY OF MUSIC, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



FOOTBALL SQUAD 

The football squad has been increas- 
ing from day to day and at present 
numbers thirty-six, and through the 
influence of President Butterfield the 
condition rule has been suspended until 
further action and the whole squad is 
now available. The members of the 
squad are as follows : — 1911, Captain 
Morse, Robinson, Ostrolenk, ; 1912, 
Moreau, Walker, McGarr, Terry, 
Pierpont, Clapp, Eisenhaure, Carpen- 
ter; 1913, Goodnongh, Gore, Lane, 
Larsen, Samson, Hayden, Griffin, 
Dooley, Whitney, Hubert, Huntington, 
O'Brien, Putnum, Sheeham ; 1914, 
Bittinger, Powers, Williams, Nissen, 
J. G. Hutchinson, Jewett, Hazen, 
Stewart, Leon Smith, B. P. Johnson, 
Roberts. 

The schedule ot the remaining 
games is as follows : — 
Oct. 1 — Dartmouth at Hanover, N.H. 
Oct. 8— Trinity at Hartford, Conn. 
15— W. P. I. —Campus. 
22 — University of Maine at 

Orono, Me. 
29— N. H. State at Manchester, 
N. H. 
5_Tufts at Medford. 
12— Springfield T. S. at Spring- 
fled. 
Nov. 19 — Brown at Providence, R. I. 

The class of 1913 has elected the 
following officers for the ensuing 
semester : President, F. D. Griggs ; 
vice-president, H. W. Angier; treas- 
urer, H. M. Gore; secretary, N. P. 
Larsen; class captain, D. A. Sheehan. 



Freshmen 

Take 

Notice 

We have a full line of Banners, 1'ost 
Cards, College Songs, Seal 1'apers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



Oct. 
Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 
Nov. 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



j»E. N. PARISEAU,j« 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



RAZORS HONED 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



SOPHOMORE FRESHMAN ROPE 
PULL 

The class of 1914 went down In 
defeat to the Sophomores last Thurs- 
day in ihe annual six man rope pull. 
The Sophomores had their last year's 
team and had a big advantage over 
the the Freshmen in weight. At the 
drop the '14 team got down first, but 
lost two feet of rope before they could 
begin to heave. The '13 men took in 
the rope hand over hand and when the 
two minutes were up they had gained 
19 ft. and 6 in. of rope. This was the 
first regular Sophomcre-Freshman 
contest of the year and the class of 
1914 still goes without its smoking 
privilege on the campus. The teams 
were as follows : — 

1913. »914. 

Griggs Brickford 

Samson Keyes 

Larsen Brewer 

Harris Kilboume 

Ellis Spencer 

O'Brien Higgins 



were as follows: President, J. E. 
Dudley Ml; vice-president, W. J. 
Blrdsall M3; secretary, S. M. Jordan 
'13; treasurer, E. B. Young '12; 
manager, George Zabriskie. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF MANDO- 
LIN CLUB 

The prospects, this year, for a Man- 
dolin Club worthy of the college, are 
not very bright unless more material 
shows up. At the first call, only four 
men handed in their names. 

Some good trips have been planned 
and there is a chance for the Mando- 
lin Club to go on them, together with 
the Glee Club ; if, however, there Is 
no better showing, it will be useless to 
start a club this year. 

In a college of 400 men there 
surely ought to be material enough, 
and I want every man, upperclassman 
or freshman, who knows anything 
about a mandolin, banjo, or guitar, to 
hand his name to me. 

S. M. Jordan, Leader. 



SENIOR CLASS ELECTIONS. 

Yesterday the class of 191 1 elected 
their officers for the semester whtch 
are as follows: President, Allyn P. 
Bursley of West Barnstable; vice- 
president, Harold H. Howe of Spring- 
field ; secretary and treasurer, Harry 
F. Willard of Leominister; class cap- 
tain. James F. Adams of Melrose ; 
sergeant-at-arms, Bernhard Ostrolenk 
of Gloversville, N. Y. ; and historian, 
John E. Audley. Jr., of West Newton. 



DRAMATIC CLUB MEETS 

The Dramatic club held its first 
meeting of the year last Thursday 
evening Among the business which 
was brought up were the plans for the 
year. It was voted to proceed at once 
with the selection and preparation of a 
play to be given during mid-winter. 
The membership article in the consti- 
tution of the society was discussed and 
referred to the executive committee, 
the intention of the members being to 
increase the the membership to forty 
and allow a greater variety of abilities 
to be represented. The usual election 
of officers was held and the results 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

POMOLOGY. 

The new building for laboratory work 
in pomology and vegetable gardening 
and for the storage of fruits and vege- 
tables has been staked out in the south- 
west corner of the vineyard. The 
contract has been let to the Madison 
Cooper Company, Wate^town, N. Y., 
who are experts in this sort of work, so 
that a first class building is assured. 
Tnis has long been needed for the work 
in pomology and will prove a great 
help in the pomological courses. 

Mr. A. J. Norman, recently 
appointed instructor in pomology, has 
been devoting most of his time since 
his arrival to extension work. He 
spoke before the Danvers Grange on 
Wednesday evening, the 21st, and has 
been visiting the demonstration 
orchards planted last spring, with a 
view to getting in touch with this work 
and finding out the number of trees 
needed for replanting. 

Arrangements are being made for 
another contest in judging and packing 
apples, to be held under the auspices 
of the New England Federation of 
Agricultural students. The contest 
will be at Manchester, N. H., on 
Oct. 20, and will be held in connection 
with the annual meeting of the New 
Hampshire Horticultuial society. 

The old Owen orchard, leased a 
year ago, and renovated principally by 
last year's class in practical pomology, 
has made a wonderful improvement 
the past year. There is a great deal 
of excellent fruit in it, practically free 
from insect injury, and the trees show 
a decided change, particularly those 
which were cut back severely. The 
work will be continued by the present 
class in practical pomology, and by 
another year some of the trees at least 
will be practically remodeled. 

Professor Sears judged the Grange 
exhibit of apples at the Clinton Fair 
and all the fruit at the Greenfield Fair. 
The Clinton show, in particular, was 
very fine indeed. Prizes were offered 
ranging from $150 for the first prize 
down to $25, for the sixth prize, and 
these liberal amounts brought out 
thirteen exhibits from different granges 
each exhibit consisting of 55 boxes of 
apples. As a spectacular show, it was 
fully up to anything the western apple 
growers have shown, at least in this 
section. 



fOR THE LAND'S SAKE 

STUDY THE PLANT FOOD PEOBLEM 

The discovery of soil bacteria, whirh also exist in stable manure, 
explains the advantage of composting and cultivation foi forcing early 

growth. In the majority of cases, it is no doubt cheaper, il not better, to 
apply stable manure In Its crude state directly to the soil, to 1 ullivate it 
into the soil and allow the bacteria to attack it there i in slioit, to com 
post it in the soil rather than beforehand In many cases it is desirable 

K> use some thoroughly composted stable manure manure which has 

been subjected to the bacterial process, broken down, and a considerable 
part of its crude plant food converted Into available forma. This, liovs 
ever, was deemed more necessary yeais ago, before conmuu ill manures 

were introduced. Now tliat concentrated available plant food CM be 

bought* the necessity of composting manure in advance is passing out. 

It is not only a slow process, but more or less wasteful ami expensive, 
for in the process of nitrification through the bsj tei ial action a considet 

able amount of ammonia may be set bee and wasted into the Rtmosphei 1 
This always takes place when the manure or compost pile is allowed to 
"lire fang and turn white. 

We try to make our Catalogues instinctive. Send fol them. 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



I. Id. LABROVITZ 



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Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits and Overcoats To Order 
Always a large and select line of Foreign and Domestic Woolens. 

Dyeing, Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing a Specialty 

A guaranteed lit in all the latest kinds of garments. 

Renovated Suits Pot Sale. 

A first class line of dent's Furnishing Goods always on hand. I'.. «V VV. 

Collars and Dress Shirts. Satisfaction guaranteed in every transaction 






1 1 Amity Street, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Tel. 302 4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS PINS 



LANDSCAPE. 

One of the most valuable courses in 
the landscape department is the new 
course in Civic Design offered to 
Seniors by Professor Waugh. 

Professor Waugh has brought with 
him from Europe numerous maps, 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Kratf-rnity 

and 

Class Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and (lass 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 

WORKS, 17th STREET <& LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 27, 1910. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September -'7, 1910. 



•.•.•.•.•.•.-.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•..•.■.•.•.•.•...•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.• 



(iOOI)S FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Dcrbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 



THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 




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HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



1 \l.1111 St. 



Northampton, M;iss. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



J. H. TROTT 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 



Shop 15 1 -a North Pleasant St. 
T< lepbone 36-1 



STEAM PITTING, Telephone 59-4. 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 

A Specialty <>f Repairing 

CHURCH Windows, 
Memokiai. Windows, 

Lkad Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big. Kittle or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R. BROWN 
Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, - - - Mass. 



E.R DICKINSON D. D S. 

DlvXTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amiiki si, M 

Officii Hoi 
OtolBAtMi ItGOtuSP.M. 



cards and photographs which will be 
used in the teaching work of the 
department. 

LIBRARY. 

It may be b^caube of the increased 
number of students or because of tin- 
increase in required reading or, for 
buth reasons that the library is a very 
busy place nuw-a-days, The carpen 
ters and painters have just finished 
work on some new shelving in the read- 
ing room, which was put in to accom- 
modate the live sets uf periodical 
aiure now available to the students. 
In adii; ion to the magazines, a small 
collection of reference books, diction- 
aries, and nearly one hundred volun 
of Everyman's Library, are now on 
hand. 

The portraits of the late late M. A. 
C. presidents and also that of 

Dr. Goessman have been labelled and 
rr hung, 

A brass plate informing the reader 
that the chap I clock was illuminated 
by the I . '1910 has been placed 
over tne fire place in ih-* reading re 
Near by is a similar plate stating that 
trie clock was presented to the coll 
by the class of 1892. 

Of the new books added the library 
during the summer, the following are 
worthy of special mention. 
Agriculture of Massachusetts, 1909. 
Catholic magazine: v86-90. 1907-10. 
Clark and Fletcher : Farm weeds of 

Cansda. 
Curtis: Practical fuiestiy. 
Defebaugh : History of the lumber 
industry in America, ed 2. 1906. 
Fernow : Care of trees. 
Greene: Among school gardens. 

nek : Grapes of Mew York. 
Kains : MaKing Horticulture pay. 
Maw : Practice of forestry. 
Scribners magazine, v. 27-46. 1900-09. 
Slosson: Great American universities. 
Statesmans Yearbook 1910. 
Who's who. v. 6. 1910-1 I. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 

stered when desired 



Olympia Candy Co. 

257 Main Si., 
Nor 1 ii amp 1 1 >\. - - M \>s. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIE6. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

71. S. H. Richmond, P. O. Bex 
128, M'ami, Fia. Real Estate. 

'71. E. E. Thompson, Superv ; tng 
Principal of the Worcester Sch 
has • sident of the Wcr- 

• r C masters' Club. 

'72.- -W. R. Peabody died in St. 
Louis. June 28, 1908. 

'75. G. W. Mills has been elected 
president of the First National Bank of 
Miles City. Montana. During the 
past year Mr. Miles spent four months 
traveling in Europe. 

•76.— W. H. Porter has been 
elected chairman of the Mt. Tom 
State Reservation Commission. 

'76.- -McCloud visited th college 
recently and inquired of the Experi- 
ment Station people concerning the 
soil on his farm near Boston. 

'81. — H. E. Chapin has charge of 
the work on ferns for the biological 
survey of Long Island. 



'81. — E. B. Rawson received the 
degree of Pd. M. from the School of 
Pedagogy of New York University last 
June. 

'82. — Herbert Myrick has estab- 
lished a new educational weekly enti 
tied School Agriculture and the North 
west Homestead at Minneapolis. Dur- 
ing the last year Mr. Myrick has 
toured Europe. 

'83. — E. A. Bishop, Arnold Mills. 
R. I., with American Cattle Club. 

'83. — C. H. Preston has been 
elected president of the Danvers Sav- 
ings Bank. 

'85.— J. E. Goldthwaite, Bench 
Hill Road, Hyde Park. 

'88. W. M. Shepardson, during 
the past year has made a collection of 
the trees, shrubs, and plants of the 
Canadian Rockies. 

'89.— A. L. Mills received the 
degree of D. M. D. from Tufts Col- 
li 1909. 

'9I.--M. A. Carpenter, 21 Elm- 
i Ave., Montclair, N. J. Land- 
Gardenirg. 

'91. — E. P. Felt spent two months 
of ihe past year in Europe studying 
museum coll- 

'92.— J. Htrura has been making 
a short stay in Amherst. He is in 
the press busine 

'92— F. G. Stockbricge, Ei.glLh- 
town, N. J., Farn ing. 

y^. Dr. Richard P. Lyman or 
Hartford, C< nn. and also a graduate 
of the Howard School of Veterinary 
Science, and for several years lecturer 
at the Kansas City Veterinary College, 
n appointed Dean of the newly 
crgariztd School of Veterinary Sci- 
ence at Michigan Agricultural College. 

'91 W. W. Gay. 156 Fifth Ave., 
New York. Landscape Gardener. 

'95. — H. D. Heinenway spent six 
s in Texas during July and Aug- 
ust, traveling for the Texas Slate 
Board of Agriculture, and lecturing 
every night on the '-City Beautiful 
Movement" and "School Gardens." 
He traveled about four thousand miles 
by rail and one thousand miles by auto. 
The State Board of Agriculture sent 
him about the state from the 
J northern part to Mexico's border and 
! along the Rio Grande valley and into 
M- xico, not only for the purpose of 
uring but for the purpose of study- 
i ing the shrubs and making a definite 
! report on the subject of the possibili- 
1 ties of agriculture and of the crnamen- 
' tal plants available in Texas. He is 
planning to conduct a party through 
Texas, especially the Gulf Coast 
I Region and the irrigated district about 
the Rio Grande Valley, early in Janu- 
ary. Very low rates will be offered by 
the railroads and the land companies 
will help in entertaining. The lectures 
were very widely reported and well 
written up. The Dallas News has the 
j following editorial: Prof. H. D. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses. 
. .11 nations, violets and chysan the mums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
uul careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 



LUNCH 



!•} Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only J torn I A. M. to 4 A. J/. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the AMHERST 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney '10, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt '10 for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



Hemenway, who is making a tour of 
Texas under the auspices of the Texas 
Department of Agriculture, is a 
••beauty specialist" of the sort that 
should appeal to every householder. I 
He believes in pretty homes and is j 
propogating sentiment for the better- 
ment of the intimate living conditions 
of the people. He urges more care in 
home-making, more time devoted to 
our dooryards, the cultivation of lawn 
grasses, shrubbery, vines and decora- 
tive vegetation. The News commends 
him as a missionary of light, and 
hopes, he may make every darken -d 
home in Texas glow with new interest 
and lasting beauty. 

•95. — Henry A. Ballou, Entomolo- 
gist in the Imperial nent of 
Agriculture for the West Indies, is 
making an -xtendrd visit toihe United 
States. He i by Mrs. 
Ballou and while viiting in Amherst 
and the college recently th-.y were 
entertained by Dr. and Mrs. Stone at 
Mt. Pleasant. 

'96.- Married Jan I, 1910,Edmond 
deLuce to Miss Eva D. Nicholson f 
Oyster Bay, R. I. 

•97. _c. F, Palmer, head of the 
Agriculture department of the Agricul- 
tural High school, Gardena, Cal. 

'98. — J. S. Eaton has been elected 
president of the International Claim 
association. 

'00. — Howard Baker, Whr- 

V/-.M la., Votorinariin, I; r in 

charge of station. 

'00.--M. B. Landers, 399 17th 
St., Detroit, Mich., Physician and 
Surgeon. 

'00. — A. C, Monahan, Bureau of 
Education, Washingon, D. C. Spec- I 
ialist in Agricultural Education. 

•00.— A. W. Morrill, Phoenix. 
Ariz., Entomologist, Arizona Horticul- 
tural Commission and Arizona Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 

'05. — J. Gardner has taken the 
position of assistant in Horticulture in 
the New Hampshire state college. 

'06. — C. E. Hood, Crowley, La., 
Agent and Expert U. S. Department 
of Agriculture. 

'06. — During the summer W. C. 
Tannatt supervised the work of cover- 
ing the mountain reservoir at East- 
hampton, making it practically a con- 
crete tank with a capacity of 3,000,000 
gallons. 

Ex- '07.— G. W. Searle is clerk of 
the Western Hampden district court 
at Westfield. 

'08,— Married June 24, 1910. W. 
F. Turner to Miss Cora E. Brigham 
of Marlboro. 

'08. R. H.Verbeck, Keazer Falls, 
Me., Principal Parsonfield Seminary, 

'08.— A. L. Whiting, Urbana, III., 
Fellowship in Agronomy. Degree of 
Master of Science from Rhode Island 
State College. 




THE H. L FROST & BARRETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



STAMFORD, CONN. 



AMHEFST HOUSE 

BARBER 
SHOP-O 



The SHOP THAT LEADS 




ALSO 



AGGIE SHOP 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



Wright 
& Ditson 

Football and Basketball suits 

the standard at all leading 
colleges. The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
( tliards the best and most pract- 
ical, also Skates and Hockey 
Goods. The Wright & Dit- 
son Sweaters have 
long l)c< n recognized 
as the best. 




College Students and Athletes 
who want the real, ■Upeiim 

»■«. v.*^ artick* for the different sports 

•••■'«'o» should get the kind that bear 
our trade-mark. Catalog** free. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

m Washington Street. Boston, Mass. 

2 j Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue. Chic ago. III. 

',59 Market Street, San Francisco. Cal. 

'76 Weybosset Street, Providence, H. I. 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 
BASSALOTTI & GENTASO 

FRUIT. 

CONFECTIONERY. 
SODA AND 

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i.i' I' U 1 " 1 \ 1 1 H"'i 1 

CORNER AMI I V ft PLEASANT SI REE I 



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The 



1911 INDEX 



May be had for $1.25 of 



II. W. Blaney, 
II. J. Baker, 
I.. M. Brown, 
P. W. Pickard, 
A. P. Bursley, 
I. W. Davis. 



- Seniors 



Id. J. Lapoiie, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



HUTO-UVERY-HORSE 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 183. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 27, 1910. 



'09. Pat Cardin, who has been 
spending a four weeks' vacation in 
Amherst, has gone to his home is ... ««.«•■! ~ , -, >.■>■> ^ . , T-..r*. « - , . r -o r- 

cub 3 He is bo^s, a, , h e Expen -THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

ment Station at Havanna de la Vegas, 
Cuba. 

'09. — C. S. Putnam, Walpole, N. Has started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 
H. Principal Walpole High School. date is over 3715. 

Ex- '09.— J. C. Beebee, with U. S. 
Geological Survey, Water Resources The College announces for the first time, a course in 

Department, Helena, Montana. Mr. 
Beebe received the degree of C. E. 

from the University of Wisconsin last r O 1^ E S T RL ■ , 

June. 



THE NEW BUILDING 

[Continued from first page. J 

of other vegetables. Of course much 
of this work can be done in connection 
with classes so that these will form an 
important part of the equipment for 
instructive work in vegetable garden- 
ing. In the basement is a large frost- 
proof room for storing the larger and 
less exacting vegetables. 

Altogether this new building is going 
to make a splendid addition to the 
equipment ot these two departments 
and one which both instructors and 
students have long waited for in vain. 



WANTED — Cosmopolitan Magazine re- 
quires the services of a represettative in 
Massachusetts Agricultural College to look 
after subscriptions, renewals and to extend 
circulation by special methods which have 
proved unusually successful. Salary and 
commission. Previous experience desira- 
ble but not essential. Whole time or spare 
timo. Address, with reference. H. C. 
Campbell, Cosmopolitan Magazine, 1789 
Broadway. New York City. 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course is open to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford a splendid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

ki nyon L. BiriTKkKiKt.u, President. 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Literary Monthly, 



Herbert W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

Leon E. Fagerstrom, Jr., Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J M Hf»ald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 
R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill. President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

H. F. Willard, Manager 



JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 



Boot & Shoes Repaired 



FIRST CLASS WORK 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON Of CUTLER 



Amherst, 



Mass. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Amherst, Mass. 

F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTBM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. K. Roberts. 



CARS 



Leave AQQIE COLLEOE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Car* at Reasonable Rate* 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, $2. Weekly, $1. 




COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XXI. 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 4, 1910. 



No. 3 



GAME WITH DARTMOUTH SIGNAL COMPETITION 



Team Shows Up Well at Hanover 

Against Much Heavier 

Eleven. 



Explanation of Signal Board Rules. 

Assignments Given Out 

This Week. 



Our football team showed its real 
strength last Saturday at Hanover, 
when it held Dartmouth to a 6 score. 
The touchdown was made during the 
last five minutes of play. A punt was 1 
blocked on our ten yard line and lnger- 
sol of Dartmouth made a wide end 
run and carried the ball over. Sher- 
win kicked the goal. 

The game was called with Dart- 
mouth kicking off to Nissen received 
the kick on our five yard line and 
advanced it fifteen. We could not 
gain and Goodnough punted ; Sheehan 
recovered the ball for a gain of thirty 
yards. Punts were exchanged again and 
Gore made a fifteen yard run. The 
plays remained in the Aggie territory 
and the quarter ended with the ball in 
our possession on our thirty yard line. 
In the second pericd, neither goal line 
was threatened. Near the end of the 
quarter Sherwin tried a drop kick, but 
failed. The officials seemed to be more 
mixed up than ever ; Hayden recov- 
ered a punt, but the ball was taken 
back to the starting point and given to 
Dartmouth for no apparent reason. 
The whistle blew, leaving the ball on 
our twenty-five yard line. 

Aggie kicked off and Dartmouth 
advanced to the twenty-five yard line. 
There were several fumbles and penal- 
ties in this period. Dartmouth got 
near enough to our goal for Sherwin 
to try another drop kick for goal. 
Dartmouth had the ball at the end of 
the quarter. 

Ingersoll and Hoban figured in a for- 
ward pass, gaining twenty yards. The 
ball was rushed to the ten yard line and 
fumbled; Johnson fell on it. Good- 
nough tried to punt the ball out of dan- 
ger, but Sherwin broke through and 
blocked it. The next play carried the 
ball over. 

The Aggie team was greatly out 
weighed, but made up for that in 
speed. Although we could not gain 
our distance, a strong defensive game 
prevented more scourir ,>. 

The blackboard talks that Coach 
Gildersleeve has been giving the team 
has kept them drilled on the new rules 
and penalties were few in that respect. 
Sheehan. a new man at end, did his 
work well, and broke through the inter- 
ferance for many a pretty tackle. 
Powers and Walker on the line found 
themselves a match for their oppon- 
ents. Gore was in the game every 
minute and Goodnough distinguished 
himself in the kicking line. Several 



ANNIVERSARY NIGHT 



Membership to the Signal Board 
can be gained by competition, based 
upon the quality and quantity of work 
accomplished by the contestants. To 
those men securing the highest num- 
ber of credits during the time, from 
October 1st to March 1st positions 
on the board are awarded. Three 
members from the Junior class, two 
from the Sophomore class, and two 
from the Freshman class are elected 
at the close of the competition. 

Credits can be secured in either or 
both of two departments, in the busi- 
ness or literary department. The con- 
testant may secure advertisements for 
the Signal, may help in the circula- 
tion department ; or he may report 
upon assignments received from the 
editor-in-chief. These reports are 
turned into the Signal office and are 
given credit by the competition editor. 
These reports may be published in the 
columns of the paper, if It is thought 
advisable. The points of credit are 
awarded according to the following 
scale. One credit will be allowed for : 
New advertisements to the value of 
five dollars ($5) at the regular rates. 



Celebration of the Forty-third Anniver- 
sary of the Founding of the Col- 
lege Held in Draper Hall. 

The forty-third anniversary of the 
founding of the college was celebrated 
last Friday night by the first college 
supper of the year. Supper was served 
to the regular patrons of the Dining 
Hall at 6-30 with the faculty, trustees 
and soma of the alumni as guests. 
President Butterfleld acted as toast- 
master. In opening he spoke of the 
occasion of the supper, the forty -third 
anniversary of the college. He then 
gave some figures showing the growth 
of the college. In 1898, there were 
95 regular four year men. In 1904 
there were 152. showing an increase 
of 60 per cent. In 1910 there were 
397 regular four year men, an increase 
of 160 per cent, in six years, and 
over 300 per cent, in 12 years. He 
also said that the thirteen best build- 
ings had been erected in the last ten 
years. Attention was also called to 
the fact, that, although the entrance 
requirements are now the same as the 
standard requirements for entrance to 

cottffa , ' "35 

160 members, an increase of 30 men 
over last year's class. 

President Butterfleld, in introduc- 



Each two hours 1 work to be given at i"g George H. Ellis, one of the trus- 



the direction of the editor-in-chief. 

Each ten inches of original copy. 
This may include athletic contests or 
college notes. 

Each fifteen inches of reprint or 
material such as speeches, alumni 
notes, department notes, and articles 
secured by interview. 

In this way a man may have an 



tees, spoke of his work for the college 
in the legislature. Mr Ellis impressed 
on his hearers his regret at not having 
the opportunity for a college education, 
and the necessity of the present stu- 
dents taking the opportunity, while it 
was theirs. 

After Mr. Ellis' speech, a double 
quartet from the Glee club sang. It 



TRACK WORK BEGINS 

Plans for Cross-country and Relay 

Teams. Dual Meets with Union 

and Trinity Also Planned. 

The track season started Monday, 
Oct. 3, with practice for a cross country 
Run, w;iich is planned to be held with 
some other college about the first of 
November at Amherst. Prior to this 
ev-nt an interclass cross country will 
be held, for the purpose ol picking the 
men for the dual cross country meet 
and also to get the men Interested In 
this work. In order to make the 
interclass event worth while, prizes in 
the form of cups will be given to those 
men taking the first live places. 
Each class will be represented by a 
team of five. 

In regard to the rest of the schedule 
the association Is making plans to 
enter a relay team and other promis- 
ing material at the Boston, New York, 
Troy, and Hartford meets, which come 
during the months of February and 
March. Also a dual meet with Union 
at Schenectady and one with Trinity at 
Amherst will be held. 

The board track will be set up dur- 
ing th» "• hanjf chiving vacation. s* that 
the practice for these meets can be 
started as soon as the men return to 
college. 

It is very pleasing to be able to say 
that so far twenty-two have handed in 
their names for cross country running, 
but it is hoped that more will take an 
interest in this branch of track work. 
Every man having any track ability Is 
asked to come out. 

R. W. Piper, Track Manager. 



next speaker was Dr. Frederick 
Tuckerman of of the class of '78. He 
addressed himself to the Freshman 



111 WHO *»«J m limn ...— y - 

opportunity to how his ability by doing was composed of Pease 13, French 
business work or by writing up happen- '13, Hills 12, Prouty 'II. Griggs 
logs about college and by reporting I ' 1 3, Clegg '13. and Ells 12. 
college activities. 

In what phase of college life do you 
expect to participate ? If you have 
athletic ability you should develope it class, first congratulating them on their 
for the college teams. If you have j number. He emphasized the need of 
literary ability why shouldn't you | taking the opportunity which was be- 
attempt to make it better by working fore them, saying, in brief. "Each 
for the college paper ? By the system ! one of you has a foundation to lay 
of credits through competition the best : from which the superstructure will 
men are elected to the board, so come ! arrise. The success or failure of the 
out and see if you are the best man. latter depends on 
Start now and get the "drop" on the 
other men. The competition closes 
March 1, 1911. 



[Continued on p*e« 4] 



must be laid either false or true. Lay 
it true by seizing your opportunity while 
you can. It may never be yours to 
seize again." 

— ^ Harold L. Frost, of the class of '95 

Several thousand brief copies of the and also one of the Trustees was the 
Columbia University catalogue, printed next speaker. He said in part. "Ag- 
in Chinese, under the direction of the ricultural education is the basis of 
department of Oriental Languages, everything ; stick it out and you will 
have been sent to China for the infor- will win out. What you can get here 
mation of prospective students. (Caatinuod on pac* 5.] 



SUNDAY TALK 

The Sunday vespers were addressed 
by Robert Lincoln O'Brien of Boston. 
Mr. O'Brien based his talk on the 
sentence. "As a man thinketh in his 
heart so is he." He spoke of 
economics and especially the relation 
of money and labor, He pointed out 
that money need not necessarily be 
spent, to stimulate industry, but that, 
investing or hoarding caused the 
expending of labor. Taxation he said, 
should be made as direct as possible 
He presented data to show that the 
average man worked trom Monday 
morning to Tuesday for the privilege 
of being governed. These conditions 
if let alone will be righted by economic 
law without state or government inter- 
vention. Mr. O'Brien in his position 
as editor of the Boston Transcript is in 
a position to speak authoritatively on 
his subject and his talk was both 
instructive and interesting. 

John Louis Eisenhaure of the class 
of 1912 has left college. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 4, 19 10. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 



Editor-in-Chief. 

Managing Editor. 

Athletic Notes. 

Alumni Notes. 



EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, 

HARRY F. WILLARD, 1911 

FRANK A. PROUTY, 1911. 

IRVING W. DAVIS, 1911. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY, 1911. Competition Editor. 

ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912, Department Notes. 

ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912, College Notes. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT, 1912. Collet* Notes. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALLEN. 191 1. Business Manager. 

ALBERT W.DODGE, 1 9 1 2.Asst. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN, Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Past Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, OCT. 4. No. 3 



Two things that are needed in any 
college are good spirit and good sing- 
ing. In an other editorial the subject 
of better singing is discussed, and 
surely better singing must be the out- 
come of the endeavors in its behalf. 
The object of College nights is to pro- 
duce better spirit. It is an informal 
getting together: trustees, faculty, 
alumni, and students to receive 
encouragement and counsel. From 
the many good suggestions offered by 
the speakers last Friday evening we 
should feel more like co-operating in 
college affairs and stimulated for more 
worthy individual attainments. 



The Sicnal wishes to express its 
appreciation for the efforts which have 
and are being made for better singing. 
The class of 1907, by offering the Arm- 
strong Trophy and the cash prize, 
which it did last June, gave considera- 
ble impetus to the cause and a lasting 
incentive to the individual classes. 
For the benefit of the Freshmen it is 
necessary to explain that this cup is 
annually offered to that class, which at 
commencement makes the showing in 
singing and in originality of composi- 
tion. Now that Professor Sumner 
has been secured as a coach, the 
whole college and in particular the 
Glee club will receive a training greatly 
needed and desired. 



but it was believed that a better system 
would be secured by the change. 

In March the places of the Senior 
members of the board are filled by 
new men. Who will secure them ? 
Read the competition rules on the 
front pages and start immediately for a 
position on the Signal. Freshmen 
are especialally urged to make an 
early start. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

A. H. Sharpe 'Hand H.Baker 
'13, gave readings on Friday night at 
a fruit show in Sunderland. 

There is now a course in Geology 
open to Juniors. This course is the 
result of petition by some members of 
the present Junior class. 

The class in Junior Pomology made 
a trip last Thursday morning to the 
farms owned by Professors Waugh 
and Sears at Bay Road. 

It is reported that certain students 
are in a serious mental condition 
because of the substitution of pudding 
for pies on the daily dinner menu. 

The orchestra has been organized 
and held their first rehearsal Thursday 
night. This will continue to be the 
regular time for the weekly practice. 
On account of the Worcester Musicai 
Festival, Mr. Sumner was obliged to 
postpone his Friday meeting with the 
student body until Tuesday of this 
week. 



Oct. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

4 — 6-45 P. m., Stockbridge Club. 
Agricultural Recitation Room. 
7 p.m., Glee Club Rehearsal, 
Chapel. 

5 — 3-30 p. m., Assembly, C. T. 
Wang, New Haven, Conn. 
7 p. m., Dramatic Club Re- 
hearsal. 

6—6-45 P. m., Y. M. C. A., 
Chapel. 

7-30 p. m., Debating Club, 
Chapel. 

7 7 p. m.. Glee Club Re- 
hearsal. 

8 — Football, Trinity at Hartford. 

9—9-15 A. m., Sunday Talk, 
Dr. Warren H. Wilson, New 
York, N, Y. 



You secure from your college course 
something other than facts, something 
besides what you learn from books. 
Ability is that for which you should 
strive, and you secure benefits in propor- 
tion to that which you put into college 
life. In what phase of college activi- 
ties are you intending to participate ? 

The Signal competition has been 
changed somewhat this year to secure 
a fairer relation between credits 
secured in the business and literary 
departments. Formerly one credit 
was allowed for five hours' work and 
for ten dollars of new advertisements, 



FRESHMAN CLASS ELECTIONS 

At a meeting of the Freshman class 
held Thursday, Sept. 29th, the follow- 
ing officers were chosen for the 
semester : President, Edward C. 
Edwards of Salem ; vice-president, 
Leon E. Smith of Brighton ; treasurer, 
D. Wyman Gibson of Groton; secre- 
tary, Theodore A. Nicolet of Fall 
River; class captain, Edward L. 
Hazen of Springfield ; sargeant-at- 
arms, Dettewar W. Jones of Melrose. 



In the underclass rushes at Prince- 
ton honors were about even, the fresh- 
men winning the election rush and 
the sophs being successful in defend- 
ing the cannon. 



UP- TO- DATK 



FOOTWEAR 



PUMPS 

ALL STYLES JN LOW SHOES 

TENNIS SHOES 

EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October j, 1910. 




rabi 1a ! 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 




I I 



II 



Cigars 



5c. and 10c, 

BRANDS 



DEUEL'S 



Drug Store 






THURBER'S 

COLLEGE LUNCH 



A.MIIi;i*M'l', MA.SS. 



Have you a college memory book ? 

Preserve your mementoes and sou 

venirs in a safe phut-. 

A neat book tastily bound in maroon 
with a white block M. 

Size of book 16 by i^ inches. M 
6 by 4 J j inches. 

Two styles one with ten Fellowship 

pages for autographs and 
70 blank pages. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



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To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



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Good Board and 
Clean, Airy Rooms 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 

There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

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New style — ten Fellowship pages, 28 

plain pages, 20 slotted postcard 

and 20 gummed pages for 

clippings. 

( Jwner's name on front. Fraternity 
letters on back free if an order of <S 
can be secured in one fraternity, 

Price $2.25 

$1.00 deposit with order. 

Order will be sent the last of the 
month. 

( >rder immediately. 

E. M. BROWN, 

Theta Phi House. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGGIES 
ATTENTION ! 

The twenty fifth annual reunion and 
banquet of the Massachnsetts Agricul- 
tural College Club of New York will 
be held at the Hotel St. Denis, 
Broadway and 11th Street, Friday 
evening, Dec. 2, under the presidency 
of Alvan Luther Fowler, '80, former 
captain, adjutant and assistant instruc- 
tor in Military Science and Tactics, 
Mass. Agric. Corps Cadets. At 7 15 
p. M., Captain Fowler will order the 
attack on the banquet hall. 

Among the speakers will be the 
president of the college, Kenyon L. 
Butterfield, LL. D., ex-secretary of 
the treasury, George B. Cortelyou, 
LL. D. and the president of the Bal- 
timore and Ohio Railroad company, 
Daniel Wiliard, '82. 

The attendance at recent dinners 
has increased yearly over 60 per cent. 
We wish to obtain a working knowl- 
edge of those to come and thus desire 
returns, even if tentative, ere Oct. 15, 
to insure the right-sized hall ; we also 
earnestly desire to hear from all; 
many last year sent messages ; these 
were grouped in envelopes by classes, 
to the great edification of those pres- 
ent, who thereby heard from men they 
may not have seen in decades, and 
who only wished that all living of the 
friends made on the old Aggie campu. 
had reported. It is hardly necessary 
to add that this, our twenty-fifth 
annual reunion, will be the greatest 
and best ever. Dinner tickets, $4. 
By order of the executive committee, 

John A. Cutter, M. D., '82, Sec. 
262 West 77th St,, New York. 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



SATURDAY'S FOOTBALL 
SCORES 

At Cambridge, Harvard 32, Bow- 
doin 0. 

At Amherst, Amherst 0, Springfield 
Training school 0. 

At New Haven, Ct., Yale 12, Syra- 
cuse 6. 

At Hanover, N. H., Dartmouth 6, 
Aggie 0. 

At Middletown, Ct., Wesleyan 30, 
Connecticut Aggies 0. 

At Williamstown, Williams 29, 
Union 0. 

At Medford, Rhode Island 5, Tufts 
0. 

At Princeton, N. J.. Princeton 18, 
Stevens 0. 

At Easton, Pa., Lafayette 10, 
Ursinus 0. 

At Philadelphia, Pa., Pennsylvania 
29, Gettysburg 0. 

At Annapolis, Md., Navy 16, St. 
Johns 0. 

At Providence, R. I., Brown 31, 
Norwich 0. 

At Swarthmore, Pa., Swathmore 
! 47, Lebanon Valley 0. 

At Ithaca, N. Y., Cornell 24, 
Rensselaer O. 

At Hartford, Ct., Trinity 2, Wor- 
cester "Tech" 0. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CIOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
i to serve the M. A. C. students 

with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

^^TTw^ the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
our. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



Carpfivter fit Morehouse, 
PRINT6J 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 




)OU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



is l GloaiBHes 



TOBACCO 



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The College Drug Store 



ALL OF THE 



ASK 
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FOR 




VARSITY MEN 

and most of the upseidassmeti 
wear 

J>I Jl>Ivl£Y 

HAND KM r 

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■I'll IKK IS A REASON." 



EDWARD l_. HAZEN, '1* 



AoKNT l"| 



Ward's Fountain Tens, Fine Kapers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
See our samples of Engraved invita- 
tion*, < lass and Fraternity Paper, 
I'.anquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c 

WARD'S 57<53 B F c; a s n T k oN Strcet ' 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



\ 1 M, \. C 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 4, 1910. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 4, 1910. 



COOLEY BROS. & CO. 



FOOTBALL 

[Continued from first page.] 



CLOTHIERS 
HA TTERS 
FURNISHERS 



HART. SCHAFFNER & MARX SUITS 



WESTFIELD. 



MASS. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily ami Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



H. W. FIELD 

... FLORIST ... 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



OIM*. ACADEMY OF MUSIC, 

NORTHAMPTON, mass. 



M. D. OILMAN. C. A. MOFFET. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

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Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 
IN 

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207 to ill Main Stkekt. 

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BEST MATERIALS and 
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alumni were present at Hanover and 
were greatly pleased with the work of 
the team. 
The lineup: 

DARTMOUTH. AGGIES. 

Daly Hayes, le re, Larsen 

Sherwin, It rt. Powers 

Whitmore, Johnson, lg rg, Walker 

Bennett, Needham, c c, Hayden, Johnson 
Farnum, rg lg, McGarr, Hayden 

Elcock, rt Is, Samson 

Cottrell. re le. Sheehan 

Ingersoll. qb qb, Gore 

Morey, lhb rhb, Goodnough 

Dudley, Cheney, Barends, rhb 

lhb, Williams, Huntington 
G. Hoban, fb fb. Nissen 

Score — Dartmouth 6, Aggies 0. Touch- 
down — Ingersoll. Goal from touchdown — 
Sherwin. Referee— J. F. Murphy of Har- 
vard. Umpire — W. F. Burke, Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute. Field judge — J. E. 
O'Connor. Head linesman — Dr. Bowler 
of Dartmouth. Time — 10-minute periods. 

Williston Wins from Second Team 
by 6 to Score. 

One touchdown was all that Willis- 
ton could score against our second 
team last Saturday. The seconds 
had a surprise in store for the school 
boys, who thought they were going to 
play a practice game. The team 
from Amherst was outweighed twenty 
pounds to a man, but frequent penal- 
ties to the Williston players and 
strong defensive work of the visitors 
kept the score down. 

At the start of the game Williston 
rushed the ball down the field to our 
6-yard line where they were held for 
downs. Smith punted the ball out of 
danger and for the rest of the quarter 
the ball see-sawed up and down the 
fisld. The second and third periods 
were much the same as the first. 

In the fourth period the ball was put 
into scrimmage by the seconds on their 
10 yard line. A penalty for holding 
placed the pigskin on the 1 yard line, 
where an attempted punt was blocked. 
Connette of Williston fell on the ball 
behind the Aggie's goal and scored a 
touchdown. The goal was not kicked. 
The M. A. C. seconds tried two for- 
ward passes during the game, but 
neither was successful. Smith ran 
the team well and got off some good 
punts. Howe and Sibley were espec- 
ially strong on the defence. The line- 
up : 

WILLISTON. AGGIE SECOND. 

Sawyer, le re, Whitney, Terry 

Grumbach (capt.), It rt, Leonard 

Palmer, L. Schlotterbeck, lg 

rg, Robinson. Stewart 
Greene, c c, Griffin 

Oeffinger. W. Schletterbeck, rg 

lg. Sibley, Stewart 
Yule, rt It. Pierpont 

Shinnick. Connette. re 

le, Dooley, Hutchinson 
Stewart, qb qb, Smith 

Slade, lhb rhb, Hazen 

Casey, rhb lhb, Howe, Jewett 

Gibson, fb fb, Hubert 

Score — Williston 5, Aggie Second 0. 
Touchdown— Connette. Referee — White. 
Umpire— Bent of M. A. C. Timer— Jones. 
Time -two 10 min. and two 8 min. periods. 

Trinity at Hartford, Saturday, Oct. 
8, appears next on our schedule. 




A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
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bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



Clapp, '12. 



Been, ' 1 2. 



Freshmen 

Take 

Notice 

We have a full line of Banners, Tost 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASKMENT OK No. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



j«E. N. PARiSEAU.jt 



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RAZORS HONED 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



Trinity played its first game with 
W. P. I. last Saturday and won by , 
the score of 21-0. Superior team 
work was responsible for their victory ' 
and a good game may be expected 
when we meet them. Hudson, their | 
star full-back was injured in the Tech ^ 
game. This will probably necessitate 
a break in the line-up of the Trinity 
team this week. 



ANNIVERSARY NIGHT 

[Continued from first page. I 



beats anything you can get anywhere 
else. The agricultural industry is 
coming to the front especially in New 
England. You have come here for 
the teputation of the state and of the 
college. Men will judge this college 
by you. We can make this college 
one of the best in New England if 
students, faculty and trustees work to- 
gether. 

At the close of Mr. Frost's address, 
another song was given by the double 
quartet, after which "Cy" Clarke of 
the class of 1910 was introduced or 
rather presented, because to most of 
those present he needed no introduction. 
He said In brief, "The college gives 
an enthusiasm. When you get out in 
the world, you forget many of the 
studies you have learned in college but 
you never forget what you have ac- 
complished. You must seek for bal- 
ance." He closed by reciting one of 
Kipling's latest poems. 

The president then introduced Mr. 
Charles Gleason of Springfield, one of 
the oldest members in point of ser- 
vices, of the board of Trustees. He 
spoke of the years that he served on 
the board and of the value of Presi- 
dent Butterfield as president of this 
college. 

The last speaker of the evening was 
Rev. H. J. White of Hartford, who 
attended the college three years as a 
member of the class of '87, before 
taking up work in preparation for his 
career as a minister. He congratula- 
ted the students, faculty, and trustees 
on the growth of the college and on 
the man they have as president. He 
said that useful things are useful every 
where, and that no matter what you 
learn that is useful, It will be useful 
to you some time. 

In conclusion, President Butterfield 
spoke of the coilege atmosphere, after 
which the gathering broke up with the 
singing of "Sons of Old Mass'chu- 
setts. ' ' 



2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 

II. 

12. 
13. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

SHORT COURSES. 

It is yet too early for Professor 
Hurd to make a definite statement as 
to the plans for the Short Course pro- 
gram of the coming year. However, 
the work which came under his super- 
vision about a year ago will be carried 
on actively, broadening in scope, and 
increasing in dimensions. 

During the past year the total enroll- 
ment in all the departments of the 



Short Courses has been in excess of 
1300. Correspondence has largely 
increased, and the department Is daily 
coming into closer touch with the ag- 
ricultural Interests of the state. 

The correspondence courses for 
1910-191 1 are catalogued as follows: 

Course 1. Soil and Soil Improvement. 
Manures and Fertilizers. 
Field Crops. 
Farm Dairying. 

Fruit Growing. 

Market Gardening. 

Animal Feeding. 

Floriculture. 

Farm Accounts. 

Agriculture in the Com- 
mon Schools. 

Agricultural Education. 

Bee Keeping. 

Forestry. 

Of the faculy of college, the follow- 
ing are engaged in giving the corres- 
pondence courses: Professor Foord, 
Professor Gates, Mr. Gribben. Profes- 
sor Hart, Professor Haskell, Mr. Hel- 
ler, Professor Hurd, Professor Jenks. 
Professor Lockwood, Professor Moon, 
Professor Sears, and Professor White. 
The purpose of the correspondence 
courses is to give the latest informa- 
tion on the subjects treated, In such 
language that any one who pursues the 
study can readily understand the work. 
The lessons are sent out one at a time, 
and are either accompanied or fol- 
lowed by a list of questions. When 
these are satisfactorily answered or 
discussed the next lesson is sent out. 

The correspondence courses are 
recommended particularly to granges, 
with the idea that the grange lecturers, 
or other interested persons organize 
study classes and that, from time to 
time, representatives of the college 
visit their classes to discuss the work 
and to offer suggestions. 

The cost of any of the correspond- 
ence courses is one dollar. At the 
present time 135, In all parts of the 
state are enrolled. 

In addition to the carrying on of the 
Ten Weeks Winter Course, the Poul- 
try Course, the Farmers' Week, the 
Bee- Keepers' Course, the Summer 
School, and the lecture courses ; the 
Department is actively represented at 
all fairs, cattle shows, poultry shows, 
poultry exhibits, corn and grain expo- 
sitions. Such was the case at the 
recent fairs at Barnstable, Worcester 
and Greenfield. 

At Greenfield the department pro- 
vided an extensive program. There 
were demonstrations in corn selecting, 
in apple packing, in the uses of the 
Babcock Test, in spraying, and in 
stock judging. 

The exhibit at the Northampton 
Fair on Thursday and Friday of this 
week will consist of fertilizers, feeds, 
spraying apparatus, farm and horticul- 
tural machinery and tools, vegetables 
and fruits, certified milk, model poul- 
try houses, bales of hay showing com- 
parative yields with applications of the 
I 



LABORATORY FERTILIZERS 

There are forms of nitrogen in the market which are more 
or less inert, including many so-called tankages or bloods, which 
are dried and ground, either separately or mixed with good tank- 
age or dried blood, and sold to dry mixers or home mixers as 
tankages, much as a little cream used to be mixed with oleo- 
margarine to give it the aroma and taste of butter. These, if 
only " dry mixed," while giving goods that may show up well 
in the laboratory, do not show up well in the field, for they have 
not been properly cooked, as it were ; and ifter all, it is the field 
test which tells the story. The practical faimer who is growing 
quick crops for quick returns wants goods that will act during 
the current season. He considers the following season when he 
gets to it. 

"For the Land's Sake" Study the Plant Food I'roblem. 



D ATI/ FDD Fertilizer Company 

Dv II IV Li U 43 Chatham St. Boston 






I. TO. LABROVITZ 



-THE- 



Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits and Overcoats To Order 
Always a large and select line of Foreign and Domestic Woolens. 

Dyeing, Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing a Specialty 

A guaranteed fit in all the latest kinds of garments. 

Renovated Suits For Sale. 

A first class line of Gent's Furnishing Goods always on hand. K. & W. 

Collars and Dress Shirts. Satisfaction guaranteed in every transaction 



1 1 Amity Street, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Tel. 302-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 

Wed ding Invitations and Calling Cards 

WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 







THE H. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



STAMFORD, CONN. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 4, 1910. 



WAVA VA \\ \ WAVA Ww' * " " 




GOODS FOR MEN. 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 



AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



.•.•..•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•..•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.■.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.v.-. 



HENRY ADAMS & Go. 



THE OLD CORKER DRUG STDDE. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



J. H. TROTT 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



STEAM KITTING. Telephone 59— 4- 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 

A Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lkad Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave, AMHERST. MASS 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R. BROWN 
Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, - - • Mass. 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St 
Telephone 30-12. 



E. B DICKINSON D. D S. 

oisivrAi^ woo aim 

Williams Block, Amhkkst, Mass. 

Orm k Hours: 
»>!«> 1UA. M.l.ttOtoni'.M. 



different fertilizers, barrel headers, 
sorting boxes and the like. 

On October thirteenth and four- 
teenth, the Department will have in 
charge the entertainment of tire Mass. 
Milk Inspectors' Association, which 
meets in Amherst and, Nov. 7-12 will 
maintain an exhibit at the New Eng- 
land Corn Exposition at Worcester. 
The object of the exposition is the 
advancement of New England Agricul- 
ture by encouraging the improvement 
ynd growing of economic plants, but 
primarily of Indian Corn and other 
cereals in the New England states 
by their exhibition, by illustrations of 
the results of experiments in breeding, 
selection, cultural methods, fertiliza- 
tion, by demonstration of methods of 
economic cultivation, and by public 
meetings, lectures and otherwise. 

CHEMISTRY. 

Chemical lecture room number nine 
is being refurnished with comfortable 
and practical furnishings. Two store 
rooms have been fitted up, one on 
the first floor and ths other in the 
basement, which will contain all 
unused apparatus and materially im- 
prove the efficiency of th^ department. 
The opening of the basement store 
rooms makes possible the leaving of 
all freight and supplies at the rear 
entrance to the chemical building. 

The increased number and size of 
the divisions in Chemistry has 
demanded the exclusion of all other 
than Chemistry classes from the build- 
ing. And, even with the third floor 
and basement brought into requisition, 
sufficient room for all classes is not 
provided. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 4, 1910. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



Olympia Candy Co. 

257 Main St., 
Northampton, - - Mass. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

Membership at Holy Cross College, 
Worcester, has reached the 500 mark. 

At Trinity the freshmen easily won 
two rushes, the bulletin-board and the 
rope rush. 

Wesleyan opened the year with the 
largest enrollment in the history of the 
institution. The university totals over 
340 and the freshman class, also the 
largest on record, numbers 140. 

A new rule has been adopted by the 
faculty at Wesleyan in regard to extra 
credit at entrance and in cases of 
graduation in less than four years. For 
each hour of extra credit, five dollars 
will be charged. 

At Wiliiams this year the total reg- 
istration of 533 exceeds that of last 
year by 2 men and is the largest in 
the history of the college, including 92 
seniors, 84 juniors, 133 sophomores, 
and 224 freshmen. 

The freshmen of Syracuse Univer- 
sity won the annual flour rush, after 
which wrestling matches were held 
between the sophomores and fresh- 
men. The class of '13 won five out 
of six matches. Another victory 
scored up to the credit of the freshmen 
at Syracuse was the salt rush. 

It is of interest to note that Williams 



AMHERST HOUSE 

BARBER 
SH0P-»o 



The SHOP THAT LKADS 



ALSO 



AGGIE SHOP 

NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



Wright 
&Ditson 

Football and Basketball suits 
the standard at all Uadiug 
colleges, The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 

( rtiards the best and most pract- 
ical, also Skates and Hockey 
Goods. The Wright & Dit- 
son Sweaters have 
I0710 been recognized 
as the best. 




College Students and Athletes 
who want the real, superior 
articles fol the different sports 
«••<■., or, should get the kind that bear 
our trademark. Catalogue free. 

WRIGHT & DM SON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

22 Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

76 Weybosaet Street, Providence, K. I. 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



PI. J. Lapte, inc. 



Proprietors of 

RU TO— LIVERY— HORSE 

Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 

Tel. 183. 

BASSALOTTI & GENTASO 

FRUIT, 

CONFECTIONERY. 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

URIC KS TO taki: MOM I 

CORNER AMITY & PLEASANT STREETS 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE 300. 



College has substituted for its flag and 
sweater rushes other contests, one of 
which is a tug-of-war. The general 
statement follows : "That there be a 
tug of war across the Green, or 
Hoosac river between all of the mem- 
bers of both freshman and sophomore 
classes. This contest will last no 
longer than five minutes and will be 
judged by a committee of the senior 
class." 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Hldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



FOOTBALL TROPHY 

Editor College Signal, 

M. A. C, Amherst, Mass. 

Dear Sir: — By today's express I 
am sending to President Butterfield a 
footboll wnieh w is used in the game 
with Wesleyan on Oct. 15, 1904. On 
that day t lie Massachusetts boys 
defeated Wesl-yan 24 to 6. In send- 
ing this I wish to suggest that by 
appealing to the alumni in a proper 
way you will undoubtedly be able to 
get many trophies which the boys are 
now holding under the impression that 
if sent to the college they would be 
lost. 

I am much interested in the trophy 
room and believe that with ycur co- 
operation it can be made even more 
interesting than It is today. In the 
past we have won many victories and 
the results of these ought to stand in 
the trophy room. 

With kind regards and wishing the 
Signal every success, 1 am 
Sincerely yours, 

C. L. Whitaker *05. 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only J torn r A. M. to 4 A. M. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. W. Blaney, '11, 

C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, E, L. Winn, 87 

Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursdays, 

Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'97._Dr. C. A. Peters who has 
been studying in Germany for the past 
two years, visited College recently. 

'01. — T. F. Cooke was referee of 
the Williams-Union game at Williams- 
town last Saturday. 

'05.— Married, June 22, 1910. Mr. 
R. L. Adams to Miss Grace E. Fuller 

of San Francisco. Mr. Adams re- 
ceived a Masters' degree from the 
University of California in December 
1909. 

'07 — J. F. Eastman, Morrisville, 
N.J., Argonomist, New Jersey State 
School of Agriculture. Mr. Eastman 
received Masters' degree from the 
University of Illinois, June 1910. 

'07.— C. M. Parker, Brookfield, 
Farmer. 

'07. — Clinton King received the 
degree of LL. B. from Boston Univer- 
sity last June and was admitted to the 
Massachusetts Bar as attorney and 
counsellor-at law on August 23, 1910. 

'08. — Married in Somerville, Sept. 
28, F. L. Edwards to Miss E. J. 
Rushton. 

'08.— C. L. Flint stopped at the 
College, while on his way to Corvallis, 
Ore. where he is to be instructor in 
Landscape Gardening at the Oregon 
State College. 



$1000 for One Story 

A Prize Offer of $2250 for Three 
Short Stories by Girls' College Alumna) 



The Editors <>f Tin. Ladies' Homi Journal oiler t<> 
the alumna- of girls' colleges three prizes, amounting to 
$2250, for three- short stories : 

$1000 for the Best Short Story 
$750 for the Next Best Short Story 
$500 for the Third Best Short Story 

Any phase of life of interest to women may he describ- 
ed. Do not he deterred from competing because you are 
not a writer or have not a literary style. If you have a real 
story to tell, tell it to the best of your ability and let us 
judge the result. Kven if your story does not take a prize 
it may be so attractive that we will want to buy it, for we 
hope to purchase a number of the stories in addition to the 
prize winning ones. 

Read These Special Points Carefully and Keep 

Them in Mind 



The stories must contain at least hoo thousand wonts, hut not more than 
seven thiiusand Wtrdt, 

There is no limit to the number of stories which may lie submitted by any 
one competitor. 

Stories by two or more alumna; working in collaboration will be considered. 
The storks should be typewritten if possible. If that is out of the question then 
tlie handwriting should be neat and clear. 

Manuscripts must be written on one side of the paper only, and sent either 
ll.it or folded. Do not roll them, nor send letters with them unless special expla- 
nations are needed. 

He careful to put your name, your address, the name of your college, and 
the year of your class at the head of the manuscript. If married give in parenthes- 
es your full name at the time of your graduation. Where manuscripts are the work 
of more than one graduate these details must be given by each collaborator. 

He sure to preserve the original manuscript or to retain a copy of your 
story, as no manuscripts will be returned. No postage, therefore, need be inclos- 
ed. Such stories as are found worthy will be awarded prizes ; others will be con- 
sidered for purchase at good rates; the rest will be destroyed. 

We reserve the right to withhold any or all of the prizes if in our judgment 
the stories do not rome up to the required standard. 

This offer will remain open until November thirtieth. All stories must lie mailed 
so as to be in our hands on or before that date. 

Read these conditions over carefully. They are stated here as clearly as 
they can be stated ; hence do not write to us about them, as such letters of inquiry 
cannot be answered. 

Address all short stories intended for entry in this prize competition to 



The College Story Editor, THE LADIES* Homi. Journal 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




1 












The College Signal, Tuesday, October 4, 19 10. 



'08.— John Daniel, 882 Hunting- 
ton Ave., Boston. Salesman for 
Charles Warner Lime Co. 

'08.— C. F. Allen, General Deliv- 
ery. Soiux Ctty, Iowa. Salesman. 
Dymond-Simmons Hardware Co. 

'09.— W. E. Geer. Shelburne Falls, 
Mass., Sub-master, Ames Academy. 

'10.— E. F. Damon, 707 West 
Johnson St., Madison, Wis. 

'10.— R. H. Allen. Fall River. 
'10. — Roger S. Eddy, Farm Mana- 
ger, Brattleboro, Vt. 

'10.— Charles A. Oertel, Expert 
Farmer, San Xavier Agency, Tucson, 
Ariz. 

'10 — W. Arthur Clowes, Instructor 
In Dairying and Animal Husbandry, 
Lyndon Institute, Lyndon Center, Vt. 

M. W. Thompson '09, J. P. Bla- 
ney. J. C. Bailey and Clarke *I0, 
have visited college recently. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Has started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 

FORESTRY, 



WANTED— Cosmopolitan Magazine re- 
quires the services of a represettative in 
Massachusetts Agricultural College to look 
after subscriptions, renewals and to extend 
circulation by special methods which have 
proved unusually successful. Saiary and 
commission. Previous experience desira- 
ble but not essential. Whole time or spare 
time. Address, with reference, H. C. 
Campbell, Cosmopolitan Magazine, 1789 
Broadway. New York City. 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course .sopen to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford a splendid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

Kknyon L. Butter ki eld, President. 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 

Electrical. Work. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

I . M. (_r. A. , 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

M. A. C. Literary Monthly, 



Herbert W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

Leon E. Fagerstrom, Jr., Manager 

R. W. Piper. Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill. President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

H. F. Willard. Manager 



JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 



Boot & Shoes Repaired 



FIRST CLASS WORK 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Amherst, 



Mass. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Amherst, Mass. 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 

COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. K. Roberts. 



CARS 



Leave AOUIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOUIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mim. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Care at Reasonable Rates 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, $2. Weekly, %i. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XX 1 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 1 1, 1910. 



No. 4 



TRINITY WINS 15 TO 3 



NOON CHAPEL 



Captain Morse's Drop Kick from the 38- 
Yard Line the Feature of the Game. 

Trinity won Saturday's football 
game by speedy and aggressive playing 
which was frequently marked by the 
successful use of the forward pass. 
Our team used the old line bucking 
formations intermingled with few open 
plays. The forward pass was not used 
because the ball when in our posses- 
sion, was in our territory most of the 
time. 

MASSACHUSETTS. T«IHTY. 

Penalties 8 yda. Penalties 1 S yds. 

Rune Back Punts 45 yds. Run't Back Punts 120 yds. 
Forward Passes Forward Passes 1 1 6 yds. 

Punts 335 yds. Punts 253 yds. 

Distance gained 1 1 4 yds. Distance gained 128 yds. 

FIRST QUARTER. 

Trinity kicked off to Goodnough who 
ran the ball back 5 yards; after gaining 
8 yards on a fake kick and then failing 
to gain, Goodnough booted off a 40 
yard punt which was returned 1 5 yards. 
Trinity after failing to make any 
advance through the line, tried an 
unsuccessful forward pass which gave 
Massachusetts the ball. The team 
was penalized 5 yards for offside and 
lost 5 more on a fake kick. Trinity 
received a 35-yard punt and after an 
end run for 5 yards and a line plunge 
for 1 yard more, attempted an unsuc- 
cessful forward pass. Our team lost 
the ball on a fumble and after a for- 
ward pass for 6, an end run for 9, a 
line plunge for 3 and a penalty for 3 
yards more the ball was on our 6 Inch 
line. Then the boys took a decided 
brace and threw Trinity for a yard loss 
and after failing to make distance our 
boys received the ball and punted. 
Trinity secured 22 yards on a forward 
pass, a couple of yards around left end 
and then Collett went around right end 
for a touchdown. Gildersleeve kicked 
the goal. Goodnough kicked off to 
Trinity and after the first play the quar- 
ter was called. Score : M. 0, T. 6. 

SECOND QUARTER. 

Trinity began this quarter by a yard 
loss which was followed by a 35-yard 
forward pass. After making no gain 
through the line an Intercepted forward 
pass gave Aggie the ball. Two line 
plays netted 5 yards and the ball was 
punted. Trinity did not gain and 
returnded the ball by punting. Moreau 
made 5 yards and in the next play 
Samson was injured, wrenching his 
knee. Massachusetts punted, and 
Trinity in six plays two of which were 
forward passes, placed the ball on our 
15-yard line from which Gildersleeve 
kicked a goal from placement. Trinty 
received the kickoff and after gaining 
14 yards on two end runs Walker 



Explanation of Reasons for Mid-day 
Chapel, by President Butterfield. 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 



SUNDAY MORNING TALK 



Mr. C. T. Wang Speaks on Educational, 
Social and Political Changes in China. 



The very fair and temperate edi- 
torial comment in a recent issue of 
the Signal concerning noon chapel 
requires from me, I think, a word of 
explanation. 

So far as I can learn, the Faculty 
committee in recommending noon 
chapel had in mind no one conclusive 
argument for the change. Several 
considerations seemed to me to make 
it worth while to accept the recom- 
mendation, and to try the plan for a 
time. 

In the first place, there has been an 
apparently growing habit of permitting 
class or mass meetings held after 
morning chapel to encroach on the 
first hour of recitations. In some 
cases, nearly half of the first hour of 
all recitations has been broken up; 
this means virtually that the whole 
hour was spoiled for effective work, 
it was frequently the case that a single 
class would be late. Of course it 
would be possible to forbid gatherings 
of this sort after chapel, but everybody 
recognizes the convenience of calling 
short class or mass meetings when 
those desiring to bring up business are 
assured of a full attendance. This 
difficulty seems to be met by the noon 
chapel, because of the longer time 
between chapel and the next exercise. 
To those who had conducted chapel 
in the morning had come the difficulty 
of always completing chapel within the 
limit ol time allotted; quite frequently 
the leader of chapel was obliged to 
run over a few minutes. The present 
chapel gives a little more leeway 
without encroaching on the time of 
any class. 

Then there is a group of reasons, no 
one of which is perhaps of any special 
importance, and yet all combined 
seem to make the noon chapel more 
desirable, such as these : It Is much 
easier to secure the presence of local 
clergymen and of distinguished visit- 
ors, both of these classes being desir- 
able to give variety to the chapel, as 
well as being of real service. Often- 
times the college officer who is to 
conduct chapel has to make a special 
trip to the college for that purpose, as 
he may have no class immediately 
after chapel, and is accustomed to 
start important morning work in his 
i own study. The same thing is true of 
' some students, although perhaps no 
'more so than at noon. The present 
'time gives a slightly longer "nooning" 
for all men. Noon chapel also allows 
time for special exercises, such as are 



Address by Dr. Warren H. Wilson of 
New York City. 



[Continued on page S] 



[Continued on par* 4) 



The regular assembly hour on Wed- 
nesday Oct. 5, was in charge of Dean 
Paige. He said in part that, Amherst 
and the Massachusetts Agricultural 
college have been very fortunate with 
regard to the interest shown us by the 
Chinese ministers to this country, also 
that we have always had greater or 
lesser numbers of Chinese students 
in our institution. He then introduced 
Mr. C. T. Wang, Secretary of the 
Chinese Christian association. Mr. 
Wang spoke of the great changes tak- 
ing place in China today; changes so 
great that they surprise the country 
itself. The male attire will be changed 
in a very few years from ques and 
flowing gowns to that worn by foreign- 
ers, not only for convenience but also 
for similarity. 

The old system of education has 
already given place to one very like 
our own or like that of Germany or 
Japan. Under the old system only a 
few men from each city were given 
degrees while now anyone wishing an 
education may have it. Commerce 
and industry have been changing In the 
past few years as our own did a hun- 
dred years ago. Perhaps the greatest 
of all changes comes along social and 
political lines. Opium, the great 
scourge of China, is being wiped out 
of China with such surety and finality 
that even travelers are surprised. 

The government of China was 
neither an Aristocracy, Monarchy, or a 
Democracy. It was like a monarch 
ruling over a democratic people. The 
cities have always ruled themselves 
and have not worried about what their 
neighbors are doing, neither have they 
been represented in the central gov- 
ernment ; however this representation 
of the people is coming. Already the 
government is on the watch for the 
bad things in two civilizations and 
rejecting them ; It is also looking 
for and welcoming the best. 

No other country in the world sends 
out as many students into other coun- 
tries as does China. She realizes that 
her best must come from the West, 
i and her students will get it for her. 
! Christian living behind our civilization 
makes it what it is, and that is what 

China lacks. 

If a follower of Confucius saw a 

man struggling for his life in the 

: water, he would proceed to expound 

', the law as given by his god while the 

man was drowning. Christianity is 

different .and the Chinese student must 

have the life of Christ before him if he 

is to bring the best from this country 

back to China with him. 



The aim of the Sunday morning 
talk is to present men who are promi- 
nent in the study of social conditions 
In our country. To this end Dr. 
Warren H. Wilson, a pastor In New 
York city, was secured for last Sunday 
morning. 

In presenting the problem "What 
is the importance of the poor man In 
the community?" he indicated that 
Jesus apparently believed that the 
poor had a positive religious value. 
Jesus taught the multitudes, saying 
"Blessed are the poor In spirit for 
theirs is the kingdom of heaven." 
He also commanded to "visit the 
poor and fatherless, and to keep one's 
self unspotted from the world." 
Dr. Wilson's definition of the poor 
as applied to modern conditions was 
"Those who do not own land and who 
do not read books," not necessarily 
that they could not read books, but that 
their interests aid not tend In that 
direction. There Is a constant In- 
crease of this class of people In both 
city and country. Strange as It may 
seem, too, the sections of our country 
which are rich In natural resources 
have a greater per cent of poor people 
than the less productlue areas where 
the wealth seems to be more evenly 
distributed. From all these facts and 
from careful observation, students of 
economic conditions have concluded 
that the poor man is the measure of 
us all. 

"We are coming to a total revalua- 
tion of mankind" says President 
Woodrow Wilson. With the exhaus- 
tion of free land in the West a new 
standard of valuation for man has been 
set up. We tested all men in the 
past by the amount of land they owned, 
but It is no longer so. There are no 
new mines to discover, no land to take 
up, and the whole business system 
does not encourage a man's progress 
under the old standard. 

The present rigid economic law is 
illustrated by a factory in which five 
thousand men are employed. The 
wage statement is not declared from 
the pay-roll of the upper class of work- 
men, nor from the general mass of 
laborers but in keeping with John B. 
Clark's assertion, "It Is the wage of 
the last man hired off the market." 
This law holds in a similar manner 
when applied to social conditions and 
consequently "The moral tone of a 
farming community depends on the av- 
erage hired man in that community." 
In a peculiar way it is also true that 



[Continued on p»t« 5.] 












The College Signal, Tuesday, October n, 1910. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October n, 1910. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911. Editor-ln-Chlaf. 

HAROLD F. WILLARD, 1911. Managing Editor. 
FRANK A. PROUTY, 1911. Athletic Notes. 

IRVING W. DAVIS, 1911, Alumni Notes. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY, 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYAL N.HALLOWELL.1912, Assistant Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912. College Notes. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Department Notes. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W ALLEN, 1911, Business Manager. 

ALBERTW.DODCE.l912.Asst. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN, Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered aa second-class matter at the Amherst 
Poat Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, OCT. 1 1. No. 4 



The results secured by the stock 
judging team at Brockton, were satis- 
factory in the extreme. To get first 
prize in team judging, highest and third 
highest individual scores Is gratifying 
as it both shows the ability of the con- 
testants and the instructor in the 
course who coached the team. This 
distinction should be incentive enough 
to make the course in stock judging 
even stronger and to induce more 
students to elect the course. 



In the mass meeting held last Wed- 
nesday the student body showed its 
disuability of maintaining the old cus- 
tom concerning the ringing of the 
chapel bell. The tendency for using it 
on all occasions lessons its meaning 
besides doing away with a custom. 
If the bell is used only for mass meet- 
ings, college exercises, Y. M. C. A., 
athletic victories, and for senior class 
meetings, every one will know just 
what is happening, when it is rung ; 
but for any occasion and for every club 
rehearsal the bell is used no one will 
be sure of its significance. The clubs 
should be systematized enough and 
their members interested enough to 
know that the organizations meet reg- 
ularly on a definite night at a certain 
hour. 



Does the student body want a 
monthly literary magazine or not? 
Perhaps, if it was judged from the 
sentiment expressed by the student 
body in a recent meeting, it would 
seem that they did not. 

Now to state the opinion of those 
who do not care for such literary rec- j 
reation. They offer as arguments j 
first, that if an additional fifty cents 
be put with the price of the Lit. a pop- 
ular magazine can be secured which 
has more than enough additional num- 
bers, longer and better stories and a 
larger number per issue to counterbal- 
ance the difference in price. Second, 
that the college has already enough 
activities, which offer opportunity for 



everyone to make use of his abilities; 
and that a literary magazine only 
means one more function to support, 
when there are a sufficient number at 
present, in a college of our size. 
Third, the nature of the contributions 
is such that they do not appeal to a 
majority of students and that in many 
instances certain prejudice is held 
against contributors. 

In answer to the arguments of those 
who do not care for the magazine and 
giving the reasons for the desirability 
of such a periodical, the advocators 
claim that a magazine is needed in 
any college. Other institutions of no 
larger size have them and that the 
college spirit here should be loyal 
enough to support one. Even with 
the many diversified activities, without 
a channel for story and poetic compo- 
sition, there is a lack in a symmetrical 
college development. And, finally, 
that personal dislike should be laid 
aside, for a story or any contribution, 
if it be well written, is literature, no 
matter who the author ; and the mag- 
azine should be judged from its efforts 
to produce good writing. 



Oct. 



Oct. 1 
Oct. I 



Oct. I 

Oct. 1 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

1 — 6-45 p. m. Stockbridge 
Club, Agricultural Recitation 
Room. 

7-00 p. m. Glee Club Re- 
hearsal Chapel. 

2 — Half-holiday, Columbus Day. 

3—6-45 p. m. Y. M. C. A. 
Chapel. 
7-30 p. m. 
hearsal. 

4—7-00 p. m. 
Chapel. 

5—3-30 p. m. 



Glee Club Re- 



Debating Club. 



Football. Wor- 
cester "Tech." on campus. 
First informal dance at Drill 
Hall. 
Oct. 16— 9-15 a. m. Sunday Talk. 
Mr. Albert E. Roberts, New 
York. 

COLLEGE NOTES 

Mr. McKay will lead the Y. M. C. 
A. meeting this week Thursday even- 
ing, in the chapel. 

Dr. Stone has not been well for 
some time and has been unable to 
attend his classes. 

A new, attractive, and interesting 
line of college posters has been placed 
in the college store. 

The annual freshman tennis tourna- 
ment Is being played off this week. 
There are about 25 men taking part. 

President K. L. Butterfield and Dr. 
G. E. Stone were the representatives 
from our college to the inauguration 
of President M. L. Burton at Smith 
college. 

The September issue of the college 
bulletin has been received from the 
press and it is being distributed from 
the president's office. The book is 
really a condensed form of the college 
catalog and is well illustrated with half- 
tones. 



UP -TO- DATE 


FOOTWEAR 


PUMPS 


ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 


TENNIS SHOES 


EX PER T RE PA I RING 


PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 




THURBER'S 

COLLEGE LUNCH 



A.MIIIvKNT, :\l.V!-»>*. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



I I 



■ ■ 



Cigars 



5c. and 10c. 

BRANDS 



DEUEL'S 



Drug Store 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



CAP «& GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



The Prospect House 



Good Board and 
Clean, Airy Rooms 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



Mettawampe Trek. 

Wednesday p. m. 3- 15 car. 

Bay Road Fruit farm. 

Camp fire supper. 

Take supper. 
Sheehan has been out of the game 
for a week or more. He has no 
serious sprains or bruises. The fact 
that he is slightly out of condition is 
attributed tc overtraining. 

Captain Morse is once more on the 
football field. He is in good condition 
and as speedy as ever. He found no 
difficulty in playing his position at 
quarter throughout the whole of tlie 
Trinity game. 

Candidates for the cross-counrty run 
are out every night now practicing for 
the interclass run in November. The 
course will be b l /> miles in length this 
year and will be laid out between 
Sunderland and the college. 

At a recent meeting of the student 
body the question of continuing the 
literary magazine was brought up and 
discussed. As there were not many 
men who volunteered subscriptions, 
the periodical may have to be given up. 

The Stockbridge club is soliciting 
funds to enable them to send teams to 
Manchester, N. H., and Brockton to 
take part in the apple-packing and fruit- 
judging contests. An effoit is also 
being made to increase the member- 
ship of the club. 

Cadet Hamblin, Co. C fainted in 
ranks during last Friday's drill. While 
the commandant was giving instruct- 
ion to the regiment, he was seen to 
step back unsteadily among the file 
closers and, a moment later, fell. 
Hamblin sufficiently recovered, after 
a few minutes, to take his place 
in the ranks. 

The class in Forestry went to Mount 
Sugar Loaf Saturday morning to study 
the types of trees found on the slopes 
of the mountain. This was the third 
trip made by the class under the direc- 
tion of Professor Moon. These ex- 
cursions are very interesting as well as 
instructive and aim to follow the lec- 
tures as closely as possible, in the 
order given, so that the men will get 
the practice in the field to-gether with 
the theoretical work of the lecture 
room. 

The Committee on Buildings of the 
Trustees of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College held an extended 
meeting at the College on Friday and 
Saturday of last week. Their chief 
business was in going over plans for a 
general development of the grounds, 
the location of the proposed dairy and 
the plans for the athletic field. A care- 
ful study is being made of the land 
intended for the athletic field, and as 
soon as possible a definite plan will be 
presented to the alumni. 

Pickard, Pauly.McGraw and Conant 
represented M. A. C. in the stock judg- 
ing contest held at the Brockton fair 
last week and secured the highest total 
of points with 2753 out of a possible 



3600. The other competing teams 
were from New Hampshire State col- 
lege, from Maine and from Rhode 
Island. New Hampshire was second 
with 2740. Of sixteen competitors 
Pickard made the highest individual 
score, 978 out of a possible 1200. 
A New H?mpshtre man was second 
with 959. Pauly was third with 918 
and Conant sixth. 

At the mass meeting following the 
Wednesday assembly the question of 
installing a mail office with two-hun- 
dred letter boxes, in North college, 
was brought up and after considerable 
discussion it was decided to equip such 
an office as soon as possible. Under 
the prospective arrangement mail will 
reach the college more promptly at 
morning, noon and night, and the 
chances of mail matter being lost will 
be reduced to the minimum. A stu- 
dent will have in charge the sorting of 
the mail. The cost of boxes will be 
fifty cents for one year. As soon as 
attendance at the college reaches 
the six-hundred mark it will be possible 
to turn the office over to the hands of 
the U. S. post-office department. 

TECH. GAME 

Saturday afternoon the students body 
will witness the second and last home 
football game of this season with Wor- 
cester Tech. 

Last year the two teams were fairly 
evenly matched although Worcester 
was much the heavier, yet Worcester 
won on a safety caused by a bad pass. 

Until last year for the past few 
seasons we have had everything our 
own way. In '07 the score was 29 tu 
in our favor, in '08, 11 to 5 in our 
favor again, and in '09, 2 to in Wor- 
cester's favor. 

Worcester has practically the same 
team as last year. Last Saturday 
afternoon, the Training School by old 
fashioned football defeated them, the 
score being 6 to 0. The touch down 
was not made until the third quarter. 

Thus the outlook for our chances of 
winning is hopeful yet not certain. 
Although our team is fairly heavy the 
men do not seem to have the snap 
and go of former teams. This was 
plainly evident in iast Saturday's game 
with Trinity. 

Of course it is up to our fellows to 
go out and win this game, and they can 
do it if they will set their minds to it. 
We do not wish to have it said that we 
have allowed a team to come up from 
Worcester and trounce us. 

Therefore follows it is up to you to 
get out there on the campus and sup- 
port your team. We know that all 
have paid the monetary tribune but 
that is not enough. If you do not take 
enough interest in your college to go 
out and cheer your team along, how 
do you expect your team to play any 
way but half heartedly? At the Rhode 
Island game half cf the student body 
was on one side of the field and half 
on the other. That is no way to do 
and the effect of a ragged cheer is 
anything but pleasing to the players as 
well as to the on lookers. 

So fellows let us show our maiden 
friends that we have a team which can 
play all around Worcester and a stu- 
dent body which can cheer and sing. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. ('. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

*the country products. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every prfa is I pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 



Sanderson 



& Thompson, 



Clothiers, 

Hatters, 

Tailors. 



C&rp?rvter & Morehous?, 

PRINTET 



No. i, Cook Flare, 



Amherst, Mass 



YOU WILL FIND 



A FULL LINE 



OF 



ALL OF THE 




TOBACCO 



A T- 



The College Drug Store 

ASK 
YOUR STATIONER FOR 




Ward'l Fountain Fens, fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students 1 Supplies. 
See our samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting < anls, &c. 

\A/A1?TVQ 57' 6 3 Franklin Street, 
W/YItU O BOSTON. 



VARSITY MEN 

and most of the upserclassinen 
wear 

DUDLEY 

//. 1N/J A'AV /' 

Shaker Sweaters 

"THERE IS A REASON." 



EDWARD L. HAZEN, '14 



AGENT FOR 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



AT M. \. i . 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October n, 1910. 



COOLEY BROS. & CO. 



NOON CHAPEL 

[Continued from first pac«-' 



CLOTHIERS 

HATTERS 

FURNISHERS 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX SUITS 



WESTFIELD, 



MASS. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



M. D. OILMAN. 




C A. MOFFET. 


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GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
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now being followed at the Thursday 
chapel ; these exercises may perhaps 
not be necessary, but they do give 
variety and 1 hope interest. 

Under the old plan, the schedule 
committee had more or less difficulty 
in arranging schedules so that the 
instructor who had recitations the last 
hour in the morning and who had to 
go to his home for dinner, would not 
be obliged to have a recitation for the 
first hour in the afternoon. This is 
clearly only fair to the instructor, but 
was often difficult under the old 
arrangement. No such problem arises 
now. 

The habit of tardiness among our 
men at chapel had grown to be a great 
annoyance to all who had conducted 
chapel. Of course tardiness may 
exist at the noon chapel unless special 
measures are taken to stop it, and 
these measures might be invoked for 
the morning chapel. But in view of 
the fact that every man now has ten 
minutes to get to chapel, the same 
time as is allowed to get to each class, 
it would seem perfectly easy for every- 
body to be on time. If it Is not feasi- 
ble, and five minutes more are needed, 
it would still be possible to have full 
time for chapel exercises at noon, 
without encroaching on the dinner 

hour. 

To me one of the most interesting 

possibilities of the noon chapel is illus- 
trated by our present arrangements 
with Professor Sumner for conducting 
mass singing at the Friday chapel. 
This arrangement was not contem- 
plated when the chapel change was 
made, but it would not have been 
made if we were not planning for noon 
chapel. While the College would like 
to employ the full time of a man for 
assisting in the development of musical 
interests here, it is clearly out of the 
question for the present. Nor do we 
feel that we could afford to employ 
Professor Sumner merely to coach 
the Glee Club. The fact that he 
could come at a time when practically 
all of the men in College would be 
together, and could thus help In build- 
ing up better singing among the entire 
student body, seemed to give us war- 
rant for going to this extra expense. 
It is possible that all men would be 
willing to come together voluntarily at 
some other hour than the chapel hour ; 
but 1 question very much whether they 
would do this with any degree of 
unanimity Manifestly this mass sing- 
ing could not be carried on at the 
morning chapel. 

I can fully understand the argument 
that the morning seems to be the 
appropriate time for the chapel exer- 
cises. But this is largely habit. 
Quite a number of New England col- 
leges, and probably a larger number in 
the middle west, have chapel at some 
other hour than the first hour in the 
morning, and the noon hour is not 
infrequently the one chosen. Person- 




nr 



ii 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October n, 1910. 



A GOOD THING 



It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



Clapp, 



12. 



Beers, '12. 



Freshmen 

Take 

Notice 

We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. 

Amherst, 



Phillips Block 
Mass. 



j*E. N. PARISEAU.j* 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



RAZORS HONED 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



ally I think that when we have become the ball was punted. Trinity was 
accustomed to the new arrangements, ! penalized ten yards and then punted 
we will find that it meets more needs ; back. McGarr went into left guard, 



than the morning hour. After a trial 
of a semester, or a year, if this 
change does not prove to be a success, 
we can easily go back to the old plan. 
The Faculty has r.o desire to make 
the chapel an inconvenience — indeed 
it has every desire to make it as inter- 
esting and helpful as possible. It 
belongs essentially to the students, and 
is absolutely for their help. 

Kenyon L. Butterfield. 



SUNDAY MORNING TALK 

[Continued from first pare.) 

the morals of Sunday-school children 
are suddenly arrested at a certain point 
and with few exceptions none of them 
seem to advance beyond that point. 
The halt is caused by the standard 
limit of the poor children. 

Thus by reaching the poor Jesus 
could reach and penetrate every class 
of people. Very often the country 
community contains every class of 
people and presents a difficult problem 
for the pastor to solve. By turning 
his attention to the hired men and the 
children the pastor will, to his amaze- 
ment, secure the parents and the 
wealthy class as well. "Hunger is 
the initial source of religious growth, 
not sin and its realization." There- 
fore we should hold the poor man 
uppermost in our thoughts and efforts. 

If there is to be a new birth in the 
church, it will be through poverty. 
Poverty uncured and unhealed is a 
curse, but poverty with hope is a bles- 
sing. Our own personal life, spiritual 
and otherwise will be determined by 
our contact with the poor man. 



and Hayden into center. Edgerton 
was then given a chance on the line. 
Trinity twice made their distance and 
then were forced to punt. Morse made 
20 yaids through a broken field and 
after no gain punted which was received 
on a fair catch. Trinity could not 
gain aid after punting Morse made a 
30-yard run, and the quarter ended 
after exchanging punts. 

The team did not seem to show its 
accustomed fight unless In a tight 
place as it did when it held Trinity on 
our six inch line. The team showed 
a weakness in not recovering their 
men while Trinity put up good inter- 
ferences and ran back punts well. 
Morse, Moreau and Brewer gained the 
most ground while Ramsdtli, Lawlor 
and Cook played especially well for 
Trinity. 

line-up: — 

" AGGIES " 

r e. Larsen 
r t. Powers 
1 g, Walker 
c. Johnson, Hayden 
I g, Hayden, McCarr 
1 t, Edgerton Samson, 
1 e. O'Brien, Lane 
q b, Morse 
Ramsdell, Ihb rh b.Goodnough, Williams 
Collett, r h b lhb. Huntington, Brewer 

Carroll, f b f bi. Moreau 

Score— Trinity 15. " Aggies " 3. Touch- 
downs— Collett, Carroll. Goalsfrom touch- 
downs— Gildersleeve2. Field goal — Morse. 
Goal from placement — Gildersleeve. 
Umpire— Herr of Dartmouth. Referee — 
Caine of Dartmouth. Field judge and 
timer — Ward of Yale. Head linesman— 
Woodbury of Trinity. Linesmen— Williams 
of Massachusetts Agricultural college— Dis- 
sell of Trinity. Q uarters— Ten minutes. 



The line-up: 


— 


TRINITY. 




Ahearn, 1 e 




Lawlor, Lennon. 


It 


Clark, r g 




Buck, c 




Bleecker, r g 




Howell, r t 




Gildersleeve, r e 




Cook, q b 





FOOTBALL 

[Continued from first page] 

forward 



intercepted a forward pass. Then 
Moreau made six yds. through center. 
Morse then made the only score for 
our team by placing a fine drop kick 
between the goal posts from the 38- 
yard line. Trinity kicked off and the 
quarter ended with the ball on our 23- 
yard line. Score; T. 9, M. 3. 

THIRD QUARTER. 

Brewer took Huntington's place at 
left half. We received the ball and 
after making a few yards punted. 



ACTION BY M. A. C. TRUSTEES 

The board of trustees of the college 
met last Friday afternoon and passed 
resolutions on the death of Dr. Goess- 
mann, whose work at the college 
covered so many years. On the 
motion of Mr. Bowker, it was voted 
that the following tribute to the 
memory of Charles Anthony Goess- 
mann, for 40 years a member of the 
faculty of the Massachusetts agricul- 
tural college, and for 17 years director 
of the Massachusetts agricultural 
experiment station, be written upon the 
I records of the board of trustees and 



Trinity worked back in a few plays to {hat a copy of , he same be sent t0 his 



our 3-yard line. Carroll carried the 
ball over for the second touchdown and 



LABORATORY FERTILIZERS 

There sre forms of nitrogen in the market which are more 
or less inert, including many so-called tankages or bloods, which 

are dried and ground, either sepaiately or mixed with good tank- 
age or dried blood, and sold to dry mi\eis or home mixers as 
tankages, much as a little cream used to be mixed with oleo- 
margarine to give it the aroma and taste of butter. These, if 
only " dry mixed," while giving goodl thai may show up well 
in the laboratory, do not show up well in the field, for they have 
not been properly cooked, as it were ; end ifter all, it is the field 
test which tells the story. The practical faiinei who it growing 
quick crops for quick returns wants goods that will act during 
the current season. He considers the following season when he- 
gets to it. 

" J'br the l.antVs Sake" Study the riant Food 1'iohlcm. 



■ y 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



I. HI. LABROVITZ 



THE- 



Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits and Overcoats To Order 
Always a large and select line of Foreign and Domestic Woolens. 

Dyeing, Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing a Specialty 

A guaranteed fit in all the latest kinds of garments. 
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Tel. 302-4. 



family • — 

Dr. Charles Anthony Goessmann. 
Gildersleeve kicked the goal. Trinity j whQ die(J Sept ^ , 9I0> at the age f 

received the kickoff and after a few Q3) was a distinguished scientist, a 
plays punted for 25 yards. We made devoted , eac h e r, as well as a loyal 
10 yards through the line. Lane took j friend o{ thjs collegei He was born 
O'Brien's place at end, Williams and eduCated in Germanyand came to 
went in to left half and Brown in full thjs institution in 1869) in his early 
back. Three plays netted 12 yards , manhood and gave to it not only the 
and then a punt was sent off which fru|ts of h is excellent training in Ger- 
was immediately returned, ending the manyj but the best years of nis ] ife 
quarter. Score: M. 3, T. 15. , He was more than a } r j em j ; he was a 

fourth quarter. '• prophet who believed in the institution, 

The last section opened with the ball its field and its future. 
in our possession on our 22-yard line. He was one of that original faculty 
The first play gave two yards and then of four efficient instructors — Clark, 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

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The College Signal, Tuesday, October it, 1910. 



. ... 

GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 




AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



•"•'• * 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone 59-4. 

GAS PITTING, TINNING 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

A Specialty of Repairing 

CRUNCH Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lkao Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 

FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R. BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, - - - Mass. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



J. H. TROTT 



Plumber, Steam £ Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL KOOM8 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 
UtolBA.M. l.»Otuai>.M. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



Olympia Candy Co. 

257 Main St., 
Northampton, - - Mass. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CAMDIES. 



Stockbridge, Goodell and Goessmann, 
who in a large measure created and 
molded this institution, who charted 
its course and directed its progress 
through the dark days of its early his- 
tory. He was a true investigator, a 
man who loved science for science's 
sake, and in making a national reputa- 
tion for himself he also enchanced the 
good name of this institution. With 
him, it took a high rank, especially in 
the department of chemistry. 

He was a man of vigorous manhood 
and sterling character, clean in thought 
and deed, a man who, in his private 
life, seta worthy example to his fellow- 
men, and especially to the student 
body. Forceful, optimistic, and sane, 
he shed light and good cheer wherever 
he went. 

We, the trustees, here assembled, 
take this opportunity to register our 
esteem and respect for Dr. Goessman 
the man and the scientist, who ren- 
dered incalculable service for the 
amelioration of mankind through his 
connection with the Massachusetts 
agricultural college, the Massachusetts 
agricultural experiment station, and in 
the laiger field of scientific research. 
We extend our sincere sympathy to 
his family, to whom he was strongly 
attached and devoted. 



FRATERNITY CONFERENCE 

At a meeting of the Fraternity con- 
ference, called Oct. 7, it was voted to 
call special attention to, and to explain 
more fully the meaning of rule No. 5 
of the Fraternity Rushing Rules, which 
reads as follows: "No prepared spread, 
banquet, entertainment, etc. shall be 
given to a candidate by any fraternity 
or group of fraternity men during the 
working season and no fraternity cr 
group of fraternity men shall give a 
prepared entertainment, spread, or 
banquet prior to the working season." 
By a prepared spread is meant any- 
thing like a supper in a hotel, either in 
or out of town, or in a restaurant, or 
in any student's room, By an enter- 
tainment is meant, the taking of a 
candidate to a theater, to ride, to a 
froternity man's home or the 
like. This rule holds for both prior 
to and through the working season. 

An amendment to this rule was 
made to read as follows: No fraternity 
man shall '-set up" sodas to more 
than two freshmen at one time, prior 
to or during the working season. 

It was also desired to make plain 
the fact that all the fraternities were 
represented in Fraternity conference 
and that all fraternities have equal 
rights and have agreed to abide by all 
its rulings. 

Members of Fraternity conference: 
I. W. Davis, L. S. Caldwell, 

N. H. Hill, E. N. Boland, 

J. F. Adams, T.J. Moreau, 

H. W. Blaney, F. S. Merrill, 

E. M. Brown, R. K. Clapp, 

L. M. Johnson, G. B. O'Fiynn, 
A. N. Raymond, G. W. Ells, 
A. T. Conanl, E. S. Wilbur. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

BARBER 
SH0P-t» 



The SHOP THAT LEADS 



ALSO 



AGGIE SHOP 

NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



Wright 
&Ditson 

Football and Basketball suits 
the standard at all leading 
colleges. The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
Guards the best and most pract- 
ical, also Skates and Hockey 
Goods. The Wright & Dit- 
son Sweaters have 
long been recognized 
as the best. 




College Students and Athletes 
who want the real, superior 
articles for the different sports 
"••** T °" should get the kind that bear 
our trade-mark. Catalogue free. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

22 Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

76 Weybosset Street, Providence, R. I. 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



Pi. J. Lpne, Inii. 

Proprietors>of 

HU TO LIVERY HORSE 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 183. 



B ASS ALOTTIJ^ GENTASO 

FRUIT. 

CONFECTIONERY. 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

HRICKS TO TAKE HOME. 



CORNER AMITY & PLEASANT STREETS 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October n, 1910. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 



LONCH 



27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed onty Jrotn 1 A. Af. to 4 A. M. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. W. Blaney, '11, 

C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, E. L. Winn, 87 

Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursdays, 
Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays. 



ORGANIZATION PROSPECTS 

The Musical association under the 
management of H. C. Walker is look- 
ing forward to a successful season. 
Several trips are being planned for this 
year for the whole association, includ- 
ing iiic Mandolin ciub, Giee ciub, 
Orchestra and Readers. 

At least one long trip is under way, 
on which several performances will be 
given during the Easter recess, in 
various places in New York and New 
Jersey. Many of the men have been 
picked but more could be accommo- 
dated all are requested to have their 
voices tried, it costs nothing. Pro- 
fessor Sumner thinks he has as good 
material to work with here in college 
as he has ever handled. 

The Stockbridge club is an organ- 
ization composed of students interested 
In both horticulture and agriculture, 
and meets every week for purposes 
of discussion of interesting subjects. 
Papers are prepared and read by mem- 
bers of the club with occasional 
debates on important subjects. Sev- 
eral men who are leaders in horticul- 
tural and agricultural lives will address 
the club during the winter. All stu- 
dents interested in either horticulture 
or agriculture are invited to join. The 
dues are one dollar a year, and names 
should be handed to the president or 
the secretary. 

The Rifle club is composed of men 
interested in rifle shooting. Talks 
are given during the year by practical 
and scientific rifle men. Among the 
men who will talk this year are J. W. 
Hessian, champion long distance 
shot of the world; Captain Wise of the 
state militia team, and Brigadier Gen 
eral George W. Wingate of New York, 
a man deeply interested in the forma- 
tion of civic rifle clubs throughout the 
country ; Sergeant Baptist of the 
Marine Corps, who coached both 
indoor and outdoor teams last year. 
Sergeant Baptist is without doubt the 
best coach in the country and he will 
coach the teams this year. We are \ 
particularly fortunate in having him 
and feel that the successes of last 
year's teams were due wholly to his 
efforts. The rifles are now being 
overhauled in preparation for the 
indoor shoot to get them into the best 
possible condition. The trophy won at 
Washington has not yet arrived but is 
expected very soon. Freshmen are 
urged to come out and shoot as special 
attention will be given to them for the 
purpose of developing a winning team 
next year as well as for the present 
year. For admission to the club hand 
names to either the president or sec- 
retary; dues are fifty cents a year. 

Debating club holds weekly meetings 
at which debating and parliamentary 
practice are studied and observed. 
Intercollegiate debates are held during I 
the year. New men are requested to ! 
make written application to the secre- 
tary for admittance to the club. Dues 
are twenty-five cents a semester. 



•— * — . .... 1 . ,.. . . ■ 

i ' • " ' ' - 1 1 



~" 



FATIMA 




■■;■ 



1 



With each package of 
Fatima you get a popu- 
lar actress' photograph 
— alto a pennant cou- 
pon, 25 of which secure 
a handsome felt college 
pennant (12x32) — *•» 
lection of 1 00. 



T 






TURKISH 

) BLEND 

CIGARETTES 

^ CHEMISTRY 



Two atoms cf Hydro- 
gen, combined with one of 
Oxygen, make water — just 
that proportion — no other. 

So in Fatima Cigarettes, 
the same exactness in blend- 
ing fine tobaccos has been 
made a definite science, in 
order that their good quali- 
ties may never, never vary. 

A strong affinity exists 
between Fatimas and Col- 
lege men. No fancy box 
but an extra 1 cigarettes, 
making 20 for 1 5 cents. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 



.V 

■t 






' ' ilv'^:! ' -l'.. ' ;;--.v:, 

'ki;V'Vt fciMl '•'•ii'l'ii ■ J 



..!.<* : i • ■ ' ■ ' i f ' ■ V-'-V i ■i , i ; , hf i r i i ii 



s 

>;■, 

I 

'*-:.".■-. 
t" mil 



PLANS FOR ALUMNI BANQUET 

Word has been received at the col- 
lege of the plans which are being 
made for the 25th annual reunion and 
banquet of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College club of New York, which 
will be held at the Hotel St. Denis, 
Broadway and Eleventh street, Friday 
evening December 2. Alvin Luther 
Fowler, 1880, former captain-adjutant 
and assistant instructor in Military 
Science and Tactics, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Cadet Corps will be 
the toast-master. Among the speakers 
will be the president of the college, 
Kenyon L. Butterfield, ex-Secretary 
of the Treasury George B. Cortelyou, 
and the president of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad company, Daniel Wil- 
ard, 1882. A system of circular let- 
ters is being started in an effort to get 
all the old men to attend, and it is 
hardly necessary to add that the re- 
union will certainly be the best ever. 

GLEE CLUB 

The Gle; club under the direction 
of Professor Sumner, has been studying 
"Ave Maria" by Bach-Gounad and 
Schubert's "Heavenly Dwelling." 
These will be sung in Chapel tomorrow 
at the Goessmann memorial service. 

In the course of two weeks the mem- 
bership of the club will be cut down to 
twenty, five men to a part. It was 
first intended to keep a larger number 
practicing and make the cut later in 



the season ; but as there are so many 
other organizations that demand the 
support of the men, that a large 
club cannot be conveniently called 
together. 



CROSS COUNTRY RUN 

During the last week a squad of 
fifteen men have been practicing daily 
for the interclass cross couutry run. 
This run takes place about Nov. I, 
and marks the beginning of the track 
season. The course is six miles and 
three-quarters, the start is in Sunder- 
land and the finish is at the Experi- 
ment Station. Barrows ' 1 1 who took 
first place last year is again out for the 
cup. He probably will be hotly con- 
tested by Caldwell '13, who slowed 
up well as a two mller last season. 

Captain Dudley of the track team 
encourages ail men who wish to enter 
the track work this winter, to come 
out and get into condition by training 
for the cross-country run. 



Several inquiries have been made 
in regard to the reason from the busi- 
ness manager's standpoint, why The 
M. A. C. Literary Magazine has been 
discontinued for this year. 

The main reason is ; because the 
students have failed to give it proper 
support In the way of subscriptions. 
When the call for subscribers was 
made, only forty-five were found in the 
three upper classes, and enough In the 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October is, 19 10. 



freshman class to bring the subscrip- 
tion list to slightly over one hundred. 
It can easily be seen, that it would be 
impractical to attempt to publish this 
magazine with this meagre support of 
the student body, when it is necessary 
to have at least two hiinHr^rl subscrib- 
ers to make the publication a success. 
H. F. Willard, 
Business Manager. 



FOOTBALL SCORES FOR WED 
NESDAY AND SATURDAY 

Wednesday: 

At New Haven, Conn., Yale 17, 

Tufts 0. 
At Princeton, N. J., Princeton 36, 

Villanova 0. 
At Providence, R. I., Brown 5, Rhode 

Island State 0. 

Saturday: 

At Soldiers field, Harvard 21, Wil- 
liams 0. 

At Princeton, N. J., Princeton 12, 
New York university 0. 

At Ithaca, N. Y., Cornell O.OberlinO. 

At Providence, Brown 0, Colgate 0. 

At Hanover, N. H., Dartmouth 18, 
Colby 0. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'03.— J. G. Cook, Breeder of Reg- 
istered Holstein cattle and general 
farmer, Amherst, R. F. D. 

'10. — R. J. Fisk is superv-o- of 
schools on the Island of Leyte, one of 
the Phillipine Islands. He is stationed 
at Alang which is about 500 miles 
from Manila. His district covers 
about 300 square miles. In this dis- 
trict he is also the United States gov- 
ernment representative, having charge 
of all government property and paying 
all the teachers their salaries. To 
cover this territory he is compelled to 
ride horseback the entire distance. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

H?.s st?.rterl on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 

FORESTRY, 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course .s open to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford a splendid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

Kknyon L. BirrrKRKiELD, President. 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY. 



FOR SALE! 

Military Uniform in Fine Condition 

Will fit a fairly large fellow. 
The price is far below the cost of a new uniform. 

JOHN E. DUDLEY. JR. 

ii No. College 

BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 
JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 



Herbert W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

Leon E. Fagerstrom, Jr., Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill, President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

John E. Dudley, Jr., President 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



J A CKSON & CUTLER 



Boot k Shoes Repaired 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURKRS OK 



FIRST Cl.AS* WORK 



Amherst, 



Mass. 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Amherst, Mass. 

R C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

AH work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. K. Roberts. 



CARS 



Leave AOQIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AQQIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Car* at Reasonable Rate* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
llucnce. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, $2. Weekly, $1. 



THE COLLEGE 




lA\\\i the 

M u 

T 20 1910 
ml 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 18, 19 10. 



No. 5 



TECH GAME 



MEMORIAL SERVICE 



Massachusetts Wins Fast Game by a 

14-5 Score. Drop Kicks and 

Forward Passes Features. 

Our football team won its second 
and last home game against Worces- 
ter "Tech." on Saturday. Captain 
Morse used the open game almost con- 
tinually. The first half the game was 
sluggish and uninteresting except for 
the two drop kicks which were made, 
but in the second half our team showed 
superior speed and head work. 

FIRST QUARTER. 

Clough of Worcester kicked off to 
Brewer. The ball was received back 
of the goal line, and taken to the 25- 
yard line where it went into play ; 
Morse and Walker gained 5 yards 
each, Worcester was penalized 5 yards 
for off-side ; after a gain of 5 yards and 
a loss, Goodnough punted, Brown of 
Worcester blocked the punt and Good- 
nough recovered; Morse gained 12 
yards around left end. The team was 
then penalized 10 yards, and Good- 
nough kicked. Clough immediately 
kicked and Morse ran the punt back 
35 yards. Our team failed to gain in 
two plays and Goodnough kicked to B. 
J. Halligan. Powers, of Worcester, 
failed to gain through center, then 
Tuttle made a 30-yard gain around left 
end. Brown tried a drop kick but it 
was blocked and Brewer recovered it. 
Massachusetts made no gain and 
Goodnough again kicked. In the next 
form play Worcester gained 26 yards, 
and the quarter ended with the ball on 
our 13-yard line. Ail of this quarter 
the ball was in our territory. 

SECOND QUARTER. 

Worcester had the ball and it went 
into play on our 13-yard line. In two 
plays no gain was made, then Brown 
drop-kicked a goal. Walker kicked 
off to B. J. Halligan, who ran it back 
15 yards. In two plays Worcester 
gained 14 yards, then they fumbled 
and Massachusetts recovered. In 
four plays our team gained 20 yards 
and Morse drop kicked a goal from the 
25-yard line. Clough kicked off to 
Brewer back of the goal line ; the ball 
went into play on our 25-yard line. 
After two small gains Massachusetts 
kicked :two plays and Worcester kicked, 
and then Massachusetts kicked back. 
Walker was hurt in this last play and 
taken out. End of second quarter. 
Ball was in the center of the field 
most of this half. Score : Massachu- 
setts 3, Worcester 3. 

THIRD QUARTER. 

Clough kicked to Powers. Morse 
gains 25 yards but we were penalized 
for holding and ball was taken to our 

[Continued on p»g« 3.) 



SUNDAY MORNING TALK 



FIRST INFORMAL 



Dr. C. A. Goessmann Memorial Service. 

Important Addresses by Pres. Stone 

of Purdue University and Prof. 

Chandler of Columbia. 

The Goessmann memorial service 
held Wednesday morning was appro- 
priately opened by the singing of "Ave 
Maria," by Bach-Gounod, by the Glee 
club. Following this was the Fore- 
word by President Butterfeld, as fol- 
lows : "It has been said a thousand 
times that the great asset of any col- 
lege lies in the men who have taught 
within her walls. How true seems 
this commonplace today, when men 
and women are met to do honor to 
the name of a man who served this 
college so long and so well. There 
has gone out from among us a man 
whose career and achievements are 
linked with almost the entire history 
of this college. He came to the col- 
lege in its infancy and saw it grow to 
maturity and power. He taught suc- 
cessive generations of students for 
many years. He won their esteem 
and affection. He oiganized import- 
ant scientific projects. He planned 
and developed practical measures for 
the public good, Wuh small rewarc, 
as some men count reward, he labored 
for the common wealth and welfare. 
Dr. Goessmann was a pioneer. He 
served in the days when foundations 
were laid. But he lived to see the 
day when all over the land of his 
adoption his ideas and plans were made 
a part of the general educational 
scheme. But the strong man is 
always greater than his work, for his 
work is but his manner of giving 
expression to the spirit within. I am 
sure that the greatest tribute that can 
be made to Dr. Goessmann today lies 
not in an analysis of his work, great 
though it was; not in his scholarship, 
substantial as that was ; but in the 
reverence and love of hundreds ot men 
who had sat his feet or who had merely 
touched the hem of his garment as he 
passed to his daily work. For his was 
a personality that gave off Influence. 
No stranger would leave his presence 
unimpressed. How strong the virtue 
then that he imparted to his pupils. 

But it is not for me to express the 
feelings of the men who studied under 
Dr. Goessmann. A distinguished son I 
of this college wili perform that beauti- 1 
ful service. A famous chemist will 
pay tribute to his professional achieve- 
menst. 1 may only speak a brief word 
OB behalf of those who knew Dr. 
Goessmann only in the last years. 

1 was greatly impressed with the 
man — his gentleness, his goodness, 
his sincerity, his modesty. I learned 



[Continued on pace 4) 



Address Ably Rendered by Albert E. 

Roberts of New York Upon 

Service and Leadership. 

The chapel speaker for last Sun- 
day morning was A. E. Roberts, Gen- 
eral Secretary for Y. M. C. A. county 
work, and member of the International 
Committee. He said in part: 

"Every man desires to be of service 
in his community, and this is a partic- 
ularly good time for a man to be alive. 
'In the next ten years one has a 
greater opportunity for service than 
has been offered during any previous 
period of twenty years,' says Roosevelt. 
It is a day when there are big under- 
takings to seize upon, and when real 
men are needed. It Is often true, 
however, that men whom one cannot 
approach for small undertakings, will 
respond Immediately when a difficult 
task is presented. This is illustrated 
by several splendid Syracuse Univer- 
sity students who volunteered as for- 
eign missionaries. When asked why 
they choose such a calling they all 
contended that it was a task which 
called forth all the resources In a 
man's makeup. 

Cities have shown themselves Inca- 
pable of self-government In the past, 
and the country community has saved 
the situation more than once. The 
same problem is presented today, and 
statistics show that in 1944 there will 
be twenty-seven millions more people 
In the city than in the country. This 
will only serve to make the problem 
more complicated, and there will be 
an increasingly call for men who have 
red blood in their veins. 

Men who will be able to cope with 
such situations will be men who have 
faced all difficulties in their own lives 
squarely, men who have coupled with 
their trained energy, clean, upright 
lives. Such men are Governor 
Hughes, Mayor Mark Fagan, and 
John R. Mott. When Fagan came 
into office the politicians at once sur- 
rounded him and intimated that If he 
would only sign certain papers, they 
would see that he made the governor- 
ship of the state in the next election. 
He refused to sign the papers and so 
unusual was this proceeding that 
McClure's magazine sent down Lincoln 
Sleifens to interview the man who 
could stand off these political bosses. 
When asked how he did it, he modestly 
said he simply had a way. 'But what 
does that way consist of?' asked 
Steffens. 'It is simply this,' answered 
the mayor 'I pray. Every day when 
I mount the steps of the City Hall I pray 
that God will help me run the city on 
the square today. ' 

(Continued on pace 3] 



First Informal of the Year Well At- 
tended by All Classes and 
Several Alumni. 



The first Informal of the year was 
held in the Drill hall last Saturday 
afternoon. The hall was very prettily 
decorated, the sides and celling being 
paneled off with red bunting. 
Between these panels were sprays of 
green and numerous college banners. 
A light lunch was served at Draper 
hail during intermission. During the 
second half the Informal was adjourned 
for a few minutes so that the dancers 
might enjoy the bonfire, which was the 
result of our winning from Worcester 
"Tech." 

The music was very good and 
enjoyed by all. The informal commit- 
tee may be proud of their work for the 
dance was certainly a success. 

The patronesses were : Mrs. Butter- 
field, Mrs. McKay, Mrs. Forbes of 
Smith college and Miss Beals of Mt. 
Holyoke college. 

The dance was well attended, and 
from all appearances, everyone had an 
enjoyable time. Those who attended 
the informal were 1911, Adams, Allen, 
Baker, Blaney, brown, bursiey, 
Dudley, Hill, Howe. Johnson, Larrabee, 
McLaughlin, Morse, Pauly. Pickard, 
Piper, Robinson, Sharpe, Warren, 
Whitney and Willard; 1812, Beals, 
Brett. Burr, Carpenter, Ells, Hallowell, 
Lodge, Merrill, Parker, Phllbrick. 
Plerpont, Puffer, Raymond, South- 
wlck, Wilde, S. Williams and Wood ; 
1913, Baker. Bursiey, Cooper, Good- 
nough, Harris, Hasey, Howe, Jordan, 
Jones, Murray, Pellett, Roehrs, Shute 
and Zabriskie; 1914, Albee, Blttlnger, 
Bickford, Brown, Baker, Chapon, 
Davis, Jones, Leate, Munroe, Shaylor, 
Smith and Taft. 

Others: Bliss '88, Swain '05. 
Bates '08, Barlow '09, McLaine '10 , 
Ryder ex-' 13, Walker '05, Glider- 
sleeve, Jordon and Morrison. 



THE MAINE' GAME 

Our football men will start Thursday 
on the Maine trip. This game will be 
one of our best games of the season. 
Maine this year has a very fast team. 
In last Saturday's game with Tufts 
Maine won by a score of 14 to 6 by 
decidedly outplaying Tufts in all points 
of the game. Maine aside from fum- 
bling showed good form and marked 
improvement over the former playing. 
I They used the forward pass with good 
1 r suits. Thus we see our team will 
be up against a team everyway their 
equal so that it will be nip and tuck 
from the start to finish. Our men 
| showed so much improvement last 
Saturday over their other pla>ing that 
it seems possible that by Saturday they 
can show Maine what we are made of. 



I 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 18, 19 10. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 18, 1910. 



THE COL LEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOASD OF EDITORS. 



EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, 
HAROLD F. WILLARD, 1911, 
FRANK A. PROUTY. 1911. 
IRVING W. DAVIS, 1911, 



EdItor-ln-Chlef. 

Managing Editor. 

Athletic Notea. 

Alumni Notes. 



ALLYN P. BURSLEY. 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYAL N.HALLOWELL. 1912, Assistant Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912. College Notea. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT, 1912, Department Notea. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALLEN, 1911. Business Manager. 

ALBERT W.DODGE, I 9 1 2. Asst. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG, Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN. Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Offles. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, OCT. 18. No. 5 



The efforts of Professor Sumner 
and the cheer-leaders brought out a 
good quality of singing and cheering at 
Saturday's game. The Springfield 
game is but three weeks away so let 
us see if more improvement can be 
made for our "big game." 



Where are the freshman and soph- 
omore competitors for the Signal 
board? So far there have been but 
three from these two classes who have 
signified their desire to try for a place 
on the board. Now men that will 
work are the ones that are wanted — 
that's the reason of the competition, 
to secure the best material in each 
class. But if you don't care to exert 
yourself enough to try for your college 
publication perhaps it is as well. 

Maybe a further word of explanation 
might help. Reports or assignments 
are not the only things for which cred- 
its are given. College notes, alumni 
notes, in fact anything of general col- 
lege interest will be received and 
awarded points according to its quality 
and quantity. Then too, time spent 
in the managerial department is worth 
credits in proportion to the time. 
However, in addition to the points 
secured on reports, the best are 
used for publication In the columns of 
the Signal. So if you want to see 
your work printed come out and show 
that you have both ambition and that 
you can produce work of a quality 
better than your competitors. . 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Mettawampe Trek, 1-15 p. m. car 
Saturday for Merrick woods, South ; singing 
Amherst. j force to give him their hearty support 

F.S.Madison 1912 will lead the t and t0 take P art > as wdl - "n a lively 
Y. M. C. A. meeting this week, P arade and dance around the gridiron, 



Thursday evening, in the chape 

The Junior class in Floriculture has 



headed by the college band. Much 

talk was heard along the side lines 

; concerning the approaching game with 

from the west wine of the old mM . I the S P rin g field Trainin g School and 



from the west wing of the old green 
houses. A little later the class will 
be given practice In resetting. 

During the past week there has been 
on View In Wilder Hall a fine collec- 



the desirability of awakening enthusi 
asm for that game and in behalf of the 
team. 

The Y. M. C. A. speaker of last 



tion of photographs showing the land- 
scape gardening work of Mr. Warren 
H. Manning. Also a few examples of 
the work of Mr. O. C. Simonds and 
Mr. Jens Jensen, all noted men in 
their line. The class in landscape 
gardening 3 has had one special exer- 
cise on this material. 

The Informal and football game of 
last Saturday was the means of bring- 
ing together on the campus a good 
many of the alumni and friends of the 
college. Since the weather was 
equally ideal for football and dancing, 
and since, when the whistle blew at 
the end of the fourth quarter, the M. 
A. C. tally was by far the larger, stu- 
dents, alumni and friends closed the 
day in exuberant spirits. 

Several members of the Senior 
class in Pomology are trying out for 
the apple judging team soon to be 
formed. The men are being given 
drill by Professor Sears In packing and 
judging fruit. They are also gaining 
experience by judging exhibits at the 
various county fairs. The team finally 
chosen will represent the college in the 
prize judging contest to be held the 
last of the month at the Manchester 
fair. 

At the request of Professor Gordon 
Col. John E. Thayer of Lancaster, a 
wealthy amateur ornithologist has con- 
tributed a box of .fine bird skins for the 
zoological museum with the promise 
of other skins and mounts from time 
to time. Colonel Thayer is a lover 
of birds, a member of many ornitho- 
logical societies and the owner of a 
beautiful private museum at Lancas- 
ter, a town adjoining Professor Gor- 
don's native place. 

The first Mettawampe trek of the 
year was taken Wednesday afternoon, 
Oct. 12, 1910. About 75 men took 
the special car to Waugh's Corners 
and the afternoon was spent in looking 
over the Bay Road Fruit Farm. 
Lunches were carried and supper was 
eaten about the several camp fires. 
The proprietors of the Fruit Farm 
generously supplied the party with all 
the apples that could be both eaten 
and tak^n away. After supper songs 
were sung and the tramp home was 
made by moonlight. 

Professor Sumner, the lately ap- 
pointed singing instructor, spent the 
last portion of the Friday chapel hour 
coaching the student body in the sing- 
ing of the college songs. He was also 
on the football field late in the after- 
noon to give further instruction in the 
The students were out in 



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Thursday night was Mr. McKay. Y. 
M. C. A. Bible Study classes have 
begun with Mr. McKay, 
Eyerly. Professor White and Profes 
sor Hart as leaders. Mr. McKay 
offers a course to freshmen and soph- 
omores on ; 'The Life oi Christ"; 
Professor Eyerly offers a course on 
"The Social Significance of the 
Teachings of Jesus," Professor White 
a course on "The Life of St. Paul," 
and Professor Hart a course on 
"Characters of the Old Testament." 
The association is now actively en- 
gaged in extension work, sending rep- 
resentatives to the surrounding towns 
as teachers of Bible classes and leaders 
of singing. 



Score— M. A. C. 14. " Tech. "5, Referee 
— Dr. Collins of Northampton. Umpire — 
Foley of Amherst. Field judges — Wood of 
Head linesman-Sibley of M. 



FOOTBALL 

[Continued from first pajje.] 



10-yard line. Goodnough kicked and 
the punt was blocked, it rolled over our 
goal line and Goodnough recovered it 
for a safety. The ball was put into 
play on our 25-yard line, no gains were 
made and Goodnough kicked, B. J. 
Halligan signaled for a fair catch. In 
four plays Worcester gained 18 yards, 
then Brown tried a drop kick, but it was 
blocked and Larsen recovered it. By 
a series of gains and a forward pass, 
our team put Brewer over the line for 
a touchdown ; the goal was not kicked. 
Cough kicked to Huntington who ran it 
back 25 yards ; Morse gained 15 yards, 
Morse tried two more forward passes 
with Larsen, the first was successful 
but Worcester got the second on their 
17-yard line. After their first play the 
quarter was called. Score : Massa- 
chusetts 8, Worcester 5. 

LAST QUARTER. 

Worcester had the ball on their 17- 
yard line ; they failed to gain and lost 
the ball on downs. In two plays Mas- 
sachusetts made no gain and Morse 
tried a drop kick, it was blocked and 
"Dick" Powers recovered it. Then 
the ball was rushed over Worcester's 
goal line for a touchdown by Brewer. 
Morse kicked the goal, dough kicked 
off and the ball was rur. back 15 yards. 
Making no gain Massachusetts punted. 
Worcester then tried a forward pass 
but Brewer got it ; our team made t o 
gain and the bail was again punted. 
Powers of Worcester tried another for- 
ward pass but it was unsuccessful. In 
three more plays and a forward pass 
Worcester gained 29 yaids. Then 
time was called and the game was 
over. Score : Massachusetts 14, 
Worcester 5. 

The fast work of Morse and punting 
of Goodnough were features of our 
team, while B. J. Halligan excelled 
for Worcester. 

The lineup : — 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Lane, le 

Sampson. Edgerton, It 

Hayden, Ig 



Johnson, c 

Walker. Hubert, McGarr, rg 

Powers, rt 

Larsen. re 

Morse, lb 

Huntington, lhb 

Goodnough. rhb 

Brewer, fb 



WORCESTER. 

le, Brown 

It, Lewis 

Ig, Frissell 

c, Sherman 

rg. Gillette 

rt, Cbugh 

re, Whitney 

!b, M. J. Halligan 

lhb. B. J. Halligan 

rhb. Tuttle 



SERVICE AND LEADERSHIP 

[Continued from first pace.' 

There is a crying need in this coun- 
try today for just such citizens as these 
men are. Unless men who have qual- 
ities of leadership are developing a 
desire for service, the condition of our 
cities will be menaced by the same 
evils, which eradicated greater cities 
of ancient fame. The remedy still 
comes from the country community 
where leaders must be raised up to 
maintain and extend the prosperity of 
our country. 

M. A. C. DRAMATIC SOCIETY 

The M. A. C. Dramatic Society 
was formed Jan. 10, 1910, for the 
purpose of giving expression to the 
latent ability in many of the students 
along dramatic lines. The rest of the 
college year was spent in organizing 
and laying plans for the coming year. 
Realizing that merit is based on 
accomplishment, the society started 
off this fall with the determination to 
present some play, that would arouse 
the interest of the student body, and 
at the same time win a place for the 
organization among the student activi- 
ties of the college. 

The play decided upon — The Private 
Secretary — has been given with unus 
ual success by many preparatory 
schools and colleges, notably Brown 
University where the production met 
with such success that several per 
formaiices were necessary. We are 
fortunate in having as members two 
men who have taken part in the play 
before. Moreover, Mr. McKay has 
consented to help coach the cast, so 
everything looks bright for a successful 
production. 

The membership of the society is 
limited to forty. There are about 
twenty members at present, which 
leaves plenty of room for men in the 
four classes whose interest or ability 
makes them desirable candidates. 

The requirements for membership 
are not difficult. Previous participa- 
tion in dramatics, or honorary work 
done in the department of Public 
Speaking, either are considered suffi- 
cient proof of a man's ability. If a 
man succeeds in making the cast of a 
play he will be, as a rule, taken into 
the society. 

The dues have been declared one 
dollar a year. 

I make an appeal to all students 
who have interest and ability in dra- 
matic work to come aronnd when the 
call is sounded. To the rest of the 
men the society promises a treat in 
the near future. 

John E. Dudley, Jr., President. 




Sanderson 
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The store for 

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We announce our readiness 
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The Fall Styles are ready 
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We solicit your considera- 
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Sanderson 
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VARSITY MEN 

and most of the upserclassmen 
wear 

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"THERE IS A REASON." 




'08. — Carlton Bates, who is with 
the Bureau of Chemistry, Washington, 
D. C, was in Amherst for the game 
fbTpowersI and ! nforrnal ,ast Saturday. 



ASK YOUR 
STATIONER FOR 



Ward's Fountain 1'ens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
See our samples of Engraved Invita- 
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Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

XI T J)_ K7-63 Franklin Street, 

Ward s boston. 



EDWARD L. HAZEN, '14 



ACKNT FOR 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



AT M. \. C 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 18, 1910. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 18, 19 10. 



COOLEY BROS. & CO. 



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FURNISHERS 



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MEMORIAL SERVICE 

[Continued from first pag«] 

to love him, although I saw but little 
of him. I often thought of him and 
he had a real influence over my own 
thought about the future of the college, 
because 1 could not get away from the 
thought of what he and his confreres 
of the years gone by had wrought here. 
I felt the romance of his career, the 
unique personality, the beautiful spirit. 

He left us when the summer was 
about to turn into autumn glory. He 
left us as the ripened leaf falls, full of 
years, his work accomplished ; con- 
scious of the honor and affection of 
those whom he had served and whom 
he loved." 

Professor Wellington then gave a 
short account of Doctor Goessmann's 
life In which he said. Karl Anton 
Goessmann was a native of Gottingen, 
Germany. He obtained his degree 
there in 1853 and taught in the Uni- 
versity for five years. A very flatter- 
ing offer from a Philadelphia Sugar 
Refinery brought him to this country 
with the intention of staying only a year. 
However when his year was up he had 
become so attached to this country 
that he never went back to Germany, 
except on a visit. In 1861 he went to 
Syracuse, N.Y. to take charge of large 
salt works, and during that time he 
gave a series of lectures at Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute in Chemistry. 
He came to M.A.C. in 1868 and was 
chemist here for forty years. He 
founded the Experiment Station and 
was active in its work up to 3 years 
ago. Professor Wellington then 
introduced President Stone of Purdue 
University of the class of 1882. 

ADDRESS OF W. E. STONE, ('82.) 

Thirty-two years ago a group of 
young men of which 1 was a member, 
entering this institution found them- 
selves under the guidance of a faculty 
of which four men stood out with con- 
spicuous personalities. My recollec- 
tions of those days are vague as re- 
gards much that was doubtless of im- 
portance, but the names and faces of 
Clark, Stockbridge, Goodell and 
Goessmann are vivid memories which 
passing years cannot efface. They 
were all men of unusual characteristics, 
Clark the magnetic and inspiring 
leader ; Stockbridge the sensible and 
practical type of the New England 
Yankee ; Goodell romantic and ener- 
getic ; and Goessmann the accurate 
and painstaking man of science. For- 
tunate indeed were the students of the 
college who, at a time when the ma- 
terial resources of the institution were 
so meager, could enjoy the leadership 
and teaching of such men as these. 

It was my good fortune to know and 
admire all of these men not only as a 
student in college but throughout a 
friendship which ripened and strength- 
ened with advancing years to be ter- 
minated only by that event which 
severs all earthly relations. So that it 
came about that of the four, 1 knew 




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Dr. Goessmann longest and most In- 
timately In the various relations of 
pupil, assistant, co-worker and friend. 
It would be impossible and indeed 
inappropriate to occupy this time in 
discussing the development of chemis- 
try in the last seventy-five years. I 
only wish to call attention to Professor 



portant matters Dr. Goessmann devo- 
ted his life with conspicuous success, 
exemplifying the truth that the highest 
purpose of human effort consists in 
some contribution to the welfare of the 
race. 

There is in all of this something 
worth noting by all teachers, viz that 



Goessmann's connection with this won- the subject, and the method of its pre- 



derful period of scientific progress. 
To have lived and shared in this was 
his great privilege and honor. When 
he left his fatherland, this great move- 
ment in which Germany and German 
chemists have been the leaders, was 
just beginning. The opportunities for 
scientific research and the encourage- 
ment and recognition of the same were 
then as they have always been, most 
marked in that country and particularly 
in contrast with the situation in Amerca. 
There the study of pure science has 
been regarded with most favor; here 
forty years ago there was little opportu- 
nity for the chemist or other scientest 
to obtain position or compensation un- 
less he could at once connect his 
teaching with tangible and practical 
results, and even to-day we have not 
learned to give too much recognition 
to pure science. 

When young Goessmann came to 
this country, there was no chemist 
nor laboratory in America giving at- 
tention to the study of the pure science 
of chemistry. He grasped this situa- 
tion, correctly estimating its signifi- 
cance and realizing that in a new 
country industrial development de- 
manded the immediate assistance of 
the scientist rather than a discussion 
of his theories. Professor Goessmann 
devoted himself from the very first to 
the teaching and study of chemistry in 
its useful application i. His students 
were instructed concerning the proper- 
ties of the chemical elements and 
their common compounds, with little 
reference to theories or speculative 
topics. In the laboratory we began at 
once to learn the methods by which 
the common elements were to be re- 
cognized and with his more advanced 
students, this method was extended to 
the analysis of materials. This in 
brief was the purpose in all of his 
scientific career, viz. to systematize 
and classify our knowledge of common 
materials in order that they might fol- 
low more profitable utilization of their 
useful properties. This was after all 
the wise course to pursue. Dr. Goess- 
mann might have achieved distinction 
as a student and teacher of pure 
chemistry in Germany, but had he at- 
tempted this in America fifty years 
ago, he would have failed to adapt 
himself to his environment ; to have 
served the public so well or to have in- 
spired his students so strongly. It was 



sentation may most profitably be con- 
nected with the environment in which 
it is given. Near at hand and not 
remotely with common things; and 
among the common people is a worthy 
field for our best efforts. 

Asa teacher Professor Goessmann 
was patient and thorough. He 
expected the student to rely upon him- 
self so far as possible. He was the 
leader pointing the way which his 
pupils were expected to follow. I can 
see him again in the old laboratory 
now greatly changed, sitting on a little 
raised platform behind a table covered 
with analytical materials, giving 
attention to the reports and questions 
of the students crowding around him, 
encouraging, correcting and directing 
each student in turn; a kindly.earnest, 
inspiring teacher, to be affectionately 
remembered by all who studied under 
Him. 

As a scientist and scholar his work 
will rank with the foremost men who 
have belonged to this college. He 
was a pioneer in Agricultural Chemis- 
try in this couniry at a time when the 
ideas of Llebig were beginning to 
arouse attention. His teachings and 
public lectures must have inspired 
Professor Stockbridge in his propa- 
ganda for the use of commercial fer- 
tilizers. Certainly the manufacture, 
legal inspection and use of commercial 
fertilizers as at present existing in this 
country has been greatly influenced by 
his work and teaching. As chemist 
to the State Board of Agriculture and 
later of the Experiment Station, his 
lectures, writings, and suggestions 
have had very great weight in shaping 
and improving agricultural practice in 
Massachusetts and adjoining sections. 

It was characteristic of him that he 
was not content merely to teach his 
college classes, but lost no opportunity 
to give public lectures on the applica- 
tions of chemistry to agriculture and 
in this way contributed in a marked 
degree to developing a general public 
intelligence concerning these matters. 
From his first connection with the 
college, he was engaged in practical 
investigation even when the resources 
of the institution were too meager to 
afford him proper facilities for so doing. 
This spirit of investigation led ulti- 
mately to the provision for an exper- 
iment station at the college, which 
was a forerunner of the stations now 



of first importance that he should | existing in every state under federal 
teach Americans how to make good direction. His interest in the organ- 
sugar and salt, to understand the com- 1 ization and erection of the new exper- 
position of their exhausted soils, to ap- \ iment station laboratory in 1886 was 
predate the value of fertilizers, and to very great and the care and thorough- 
study the increased productiveness of ness with which this was planned was 
their farms. To all of these very im- . entirely characteristic of the man. In 



LABORATORY FERTILIZERS 

There are forms of nitrogen in the market which erf B>ON 

or less inert, including many so-called tankages 01 bloods, which 
are dried and ground, either separately or mixed with good 1. mk- 
age or dried blood, and sold to dry mixers or home mixeis as 
tankages, much as a little cream used to be mixed with oleo- 
margarine to give it the aroma and taste of lutttei. These, ii 
only " dry mixed," while giving goods that may show up well 
in the laboratory, do not show up well in the field, for they h 1VC 
not been properly cooked, as it were ; ami ifter all. it is the field 
test which tells the story. The practical fanner who is growing 
quick crops for quick returns wants goods that will act during 
the current season. He considers the following season when he 
gets to it. 

"For the J At mi's .Wr" .S'/Wv the Plant F—d Prohltm, 



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Tel. 302-4. 



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The College Signal, Tuesday, October 18, 1910. 



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Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 
BtolflA.M. 1.80to8P.M. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



Olvmpia Candv Co. 

257 Main St., 
Northampton, - - Mass. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



his methods of work he was most 
painstaking and industrious. Never 
in haste, careful, thorough and accu- 
rate, he accomplished great tasks 
with apparent ease. 

His industry and ability brought to 
him abundant recognition and respon- 
sibilities. He was Professor of Chem- 
istry in the college, Chemist to the 
State Board of Agriculture, Director 
and Chemist of the Experiment Sta- 
tion, one of the founders and the first 
president of the American association 
of Agricultural Chemists, and a mem- 
ber and worker m many societies and 
public enterprises. 

Dr. Goessmann's modesty and 
patience were noteworthy. I have 
seen him when the college was suffer- 
ing from unpopularity or when some 
cherished plan of his for public welfare 
was threatened and it seemed as if the 
labor of years was lost, face the future 
calmly and serenely. His character- 
istic remark at such times was "Well, 
let us once go quietly on. " This faith 
in the ultimate triumph of right was 
the faith of the scientist who, knowing 
the truth, never doubts the outcome. 

His familiar figure was one of the 
best known in the streets of Amherst 
and it is safe to say no man was more 
highly respected by his townsmen. 
This is a tribute to the rounded quality 
of his character, that while his work 
lay in the field of a science not popular 
in its appeal, he was a prophet not 
without honor in his own country. He 
was never classified by the public with 
the proverbial impractical college 
professor. 

Here was a man who for forty years 
gave his life to this institution in a 
conspicuously useful manner as 
teacher, member of the faculty, scien- 
tist and citizen. In all these years no 
one ever questioned his integrity, his 
motives, or his ability. What a record 
of science he made ! What an 
example he leaves behind him for an 
inheritance not only to his pupils and 
colleagues, but to all succeeding gen- 
erations in this college community. 
There is no more inspiring example 
for our youth than the record of a 
many-sided successful human life and 
such a life was that of Charles Anthony 
Goessmann, So far as this institution 
is concerned, I am inclined to think 
that not the least valuable contribution 
of his life has been that of his charac- 
ter. We need today the example of 
such lives to counteract the tendency 
toward superficiality, dishonesty and 
selfishness. We need the scientific 
spirit which seeks the truth at any 
cost. This spirit should permeate all 
society and human enterprise. So, 
therefore, when there arises one whose 
long life has been dominated by the 
scientific spirit and who in that con 
nection exhibits the highest traits of 
character, that life is worthy of emu- 
lation. Let us keep in mind also that 
these qualities in every one are the 
expression of principles which are fun- 
damental in scientific study. The 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 18, 19 10. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

BARBER 
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The SHOP THAT LEADS 



ALSO 



AGGIE SHOP 

NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



Wright 
&Ditson 

Football and Hasketball suits 
the standard at all leading 
colleges. The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
Guards the best and most pract- 
ical, also Skates and Hockey 
Goods. The Wright & Dit- 
son Sweaters have 
long been recognized 
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College Students and Athletes 
who want the real, superior 
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"• •• ** T - °" should get the kind that bear 
our trade-mark. Catalogue free. 

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Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



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Proprietors of 

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Rear Draper Hotel 
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Tel. 183. 



BASSALO TTI & GENT ASO 

FRUIT. 

CONFECTIONERY, 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

BRICKS TO TAKE HOME. 



CORNER AMITY & PLFIASANT STREETS 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



37 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from I A. M. to 4 A.M. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. W. Blaney, 'n, 

C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, E. L. Winn, 87 

Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursdays, 

Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays. 



spirit of honest Inquiry, of the accept- 
ance of the truth, and faith in Its ulti- 
mate triumph, the qualities of integ- 
rity, of earnest endeavor, of self-sacri- 
fice and unselfishness ; these are the 
foremost traits of human character but 
at the same time they underlie all true 
scientific enterprise. This institution 
devoted to scientific teaching and in 
vestigation is no less dedicated to the 
development of high character and it 
should be a stimulus to Its youth to 
realize that these lofty purposes are 
after all inseparable. The life of Pro- 
fessor Goessmann exemplifies this 
truth and should long inspire the teach- 
ers and students of this college to true 
devotion and high Ideals. 

The college cannot honor his mem- 
ory too highly or impress upon its stu- 
dents the value of such a life too 
strongly. There should be here some 
tangible memorial to Dr. Goessmann. 
It is to be hoped that ere long a chem- 
ical laboratory may be provided com- 
porting better than the present one 
with the traditions of an institution so 
well known for its work in Chemistry 
and so many of whose graduates have 
made honorable careers in this field, 
and when this is done, it should be 
named the Goessmann Laboratory. 
The state of Massachusetts owes some 
lasting testimonial to his valuable ser- 
vices and none could be so appropriate 
or serve so useful a purpose as a well- 
equipped laboratory of instruction in 
chemistry. 

But after all, Dr. Goessmann's 
memory will be most tenderly pre- 
served in the hearts of the many grad- 
uates and students of the institution to 
whom his personality was a real inspir- 
ation, who in their careers have fol- 
lowed his teaching or in their lives 
have reflected his character. This is 
the highest success of any teacher to 
inspire youth, and the grandest monu- 
ment to any man is the multiplication 
of his own life in the successful lives 
of others. 

After another song had been ably 
rendered by the Glee club, Professor 
Wellington introduced Professor Chan- 
dler of Columbia university, who gave 
only a few reminiscences of Doctor 
Goessman's life. He said in part 
that : We were friends for fifty-six 
years and In that time I had come to 
respect, admire, and love the great 
man. Doctor Goessmann was always 
the most interested and generous 
teacher and we came to know each 
other very well as teacher and student. 
After he came to this country I saw 
him but twice and corresdonded rather 
intermittently. He did wonderful 
things with almost nothing to do with. 
His laboratory in which he invented 
the process of manufacturing pure salt 
was nothing but a couple of horses 
with a drawing table placed upon them, 
and with a very moderate amount of 
materials. His inventions never real- 
ised anything for himself because he 
failed to look after his own interests, 
and someone else benefitted by his 



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lack of business ability. In all my 
acquaintance with him and in situa- 
tions, which were very trying I never 
knew him to lose his temper. His 
influence is still over me and much 
that is good in me came from Doctor 
Goessmann. 



COLLEGE REGISTRATION 

The registrar of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural college has prepared a 
statement of the registration of the 
college to date. It shows a total 
enrollment of students in the four 
years' course of 402, divided as 
follows : 

Seniors, 45 

Juniors, 87 

Sophomores, 1 10 

Freshmen, 160 

In addition there are 16 unclassified 
students enrolled, who are taking 
regular college studies, and who have 
had a high school education or its 
equivalent. The enrollment of post- 
graduates for the year has not been 
completed, but there will be about 15 
catalogued. This gives a total regis- 
tration of students of college grade of 
433, an increase of about 80 over last 
year. 

The increase in the freshman class 
over last year is about 25. This is 
very gratifying to the authorities of the 
college in view of the fact that the 
increased entrance requirements were 



put into full force for the first time 
this autumn. 

The whole number of applications 
for entrance to the freshman class was 
257. Of these 79 were rejected, and 
18 admitted who failed to report. 
This seems to indicate that the college 
is receiving its increased attendance In 
the face of constantly higher standards 
for admission. The entrance require- 
ments are now substantially on the 
basis of the average college, being 14 
" Carnegie units." 



MILK INSPECTORS MEET 

The Massachusetts Milk Inspectors' 
Association held a meeting at the col- 
lege Thursday and Friday, Oct. 13-14. 

The meeting was opened at 1-30 
Thursday by a business meeting follow- 
ing dinner at Draper Hall. At two 
o'clock, Philip H. Smith of the Ex- 
periment Station Staff spoke on 
"Some recent investigations in con- 
nection with the Babcock test," in the 
agricultural lecture room. At three 
o'clock the members visited the col- 
lege barns and inspected the methods 
used in the productiou of clean milk. 

The evening meeting was in charge 
of Prof. W. P. B. Lockwood who 
spoke on "The Milk Question in Mas- 
sachusetts. ' ' Also a very interesting 
talk was listened to by Mr. Howe of 
Marlboro, a prominent dairyman. 

The Friday meeting was also In 
charge of Professor Lockwood who 












8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 18, 1910. 



gave demonstrations In the use of the 
score card. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'80.— W. G. Lee, Corning, 
Tehama Co., Cal. Mr. Lee left 

. iVljvAv * *-»i jr — c*» ctnu uaj otan^a iiuii 

growing in the Sacramento valley. 
He has 47 1-2 acres, most of which 
is in peaches, olives and almonds. 

'88.— Herbert C. Bliss and wife 
visited college for a few days last week. 

'04.— Prof. M. A. Blake is the 
author of Bulletin 231 of the New 
Jersey Experiment Station on "The 
Second Season with the Peach 
Orchard." 

FOR SALE ! 

Military Uniform in Fine Condition 

Will fit ■ fairly luge fellow. 
The price is far below the cost of a new uniform. 

JOHN E. DUDLEY. JR. 

11 No. College 

WANTED 

ISY THK 

Library of the Mass. Agr. College 



College Signal, March 22 and June 14, 
1910. 

Karm-Poultry, Feb. i, 1908, 19:3. 

Farmers' Bulletins, 45, 70, 125, 321, 336, 

Mass. State Agr. Kxp. Station, Bulletins, 
1 — 14 inclusive. 

Wisconsin Agr. Kxp. Station, Bulletin, 
140. 

Any of the above items will be grate- 
fully received. 

Ciiari.es R. Green, Librarian. 

FRANK S. O'bRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND MACK 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Has started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 

FORESTRY, 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course .s open to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford a splendid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

Kenvon L. Butterfield, President. 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 



8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, - - MASS. 

Telephone 

BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 



Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 
JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 



Herbert W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

Leon E. Fagerstrom, Jr., Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Hcald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill. President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

John E. Dudley, Jr., President 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



J A CKSON & CUTLER 



Boot & Shoes Repaired 



FIRST CLASS WORK 



Amherst, 



Mass. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Amherst, Mass. 



R C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 

COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



CARS 



Leave AGGIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
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CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AGGIE COL- 
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Special Can at Reasonable Rates 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. M CO 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 






An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, %2. Weekly, $1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XXI. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 25, 1910. 



No. 6 



FOOTBALL 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY M. A. C. TEAMS WIN 



Maine Wins a Decisive Victory by a John Graham Brooks, a Noted Cam 



29-2 Score. Maine's Punting and 

Kicking Placement Goals are 

the Features of the Game. 

The Maine university football team 
sprung a big surprise on us last Satur- 
day at Orono, winning by a score of 
29-2. 

Our team could not get their plays 
into working order during the first two 
periods and it was then that Maine 
took advantage of Massachusetts' 
weakness and pushed over three touch- 
downs and two field goals. Most of 
the ground gained was made through 
our line; the ends put up a fine defen- 
sive game, smothering everything that 
came their way. Shepherd played the 
whole game for Maine, and gave«a 
fine exhibition of punting and kicking 
field goals. The Aggies started the 
third period with a rush and were well 
on their way to a touchdown, when 
undeserved penalties stopped their 
progress. However Maine could not 
cross our goal line in the last two 
periods, but Shepherd succeeded in 
getting two more goals from place- 
ment. The treatment given our team 
by the officials was far from satisfac- 
tory, this alone being enough to dis- 
courage the players. The lineup: 

MAINE. MASSACHUSETTS. 

King. Cook, le le. Lane, Edgerton 

Bigelow, It It. Samson 

Whitney, lg lg. Hayden, McGarr 

Fales, c c. Johnson 

Crowell, Murray. Tippling, rg 

rg. Walker. Haydon 
McNeil, rt rt. Powers 

Buck, Davis, re. re, Larsen 

Smith, qb. qb, Morse 

Cobb, Carleton, lhb Ihb, Huntington 

Parker, Smiley, rhb 

rhb. Goodnough. Williams 
Shepherd, Hammond, fb fb. Brewer 

Score— University of Maine 29. Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College 2. Touch- 
downs—Parker, Shepherd, Carlton. Goals 
from touchdowns— Shepherd 2. Goals 
frcm field— Shepherd 4. Safety— Smith. 
Umpire— Jones. Haverford. Referee— 
Macreadie. Field judge— Boy nton, Bow- 
doin. Headlinesman— Kent. Time— Two 
15-min, and two 12-min. quarters. 



bridge Socialist, Speaks of the Pos- 
sibilities Along Agricultural 
Lines of Advancement. 

The regular Wednesday Assembly 
of Oct. 19, 1910, was In charge of 
President Butterfield, who introduced 
Mr. John Graham Brooks. 

Mr. Brooks said that he remem- 
bered seeing a couple of agricultural 
students laughed at by a group of clas- 
sically educated men and that he hoped 
to see men wirh a classical education 
laughed at by agricultural students, 
figuratively speaking. 

In speaking of the relation of politics 
to agriculture he said that the relation 
was direct and that in England at one 
time the laws of the country were 
made entirely by the owners of the 
land, and that this state of affairs was 
coming in this country for politics are 
made by the kinds of business in which 
the people are engaged. The main 
work of the people in life will soon be 
the application of science to agricul- 
ture. The influence of cooperative 
institutions is already manifesting itself 
in the selection ot the oest men to 
represent these Institutions and when 
agriculture Is run on a cooperative 
basis the men who will represent it will 
be the best men In that occupation 
instead of men in other occupailons. 

Denmark is covered with coopera- 
tive institutions and already great 
changes are being made in the home 
and in the schools on account of this 
idea. Agriculture, the new science, 
tends to break down the snobbishness 
caused by classical education. Now- 
adays great men are asking each other 
what the next great art will be. The 
art of sculpture grew and reached its 
height in the days of Greece ; painting 
reached its height in the days of 
Rome, and music during the Renais- 
sance. Of course no one can say 
what the next great art will be but It 
will be the application of science to the 
soil when run on the cooperative pian. 
Captain Martin took charge of the 
meeting after the Assembly hour and 
said that this college owes something 
to the country In return for the land 
grant of the college. We are trying 
to return something by promoting rifle 
shooting at M. A. C. For the first 
time since the Indoor and Outdoor 
trophies were put up for competition 



SUNDAY MORNING TALK 



WORCESTER TECH. HAS A 
ROPE-PULL 

Last Monday, Oct. 17, the Fresh- 
men class of Worcester Polytechnic 
institute won the annual rope-pull from 
the Sophomores across the pond of the 
institution. The contest lasted two 

and one-quarter hours, the freshmen thft y are now both held by one college, 
got the drop and then pulled the Soph- and tnat co llege is M. A. C. 
mores through the pond inch by inch. ! president Butterfield then presented 
Each class was represented by a team \ the trop hy to Captain Sharpe of the 
of 40 men. A week ago the two ; Rjf , e -r- earn on behalf of the N. R. A. 
classes made an attempt to settle the and a j s0 jn behalf of the trustees and 
question of supremacy, but the rope 
broke and the struggle was postponed. 



Fruit Judging and Packing Teams Win 

Keen Intercollegiate Contest with 

Maine, New Hampshire and 

Connecticut State Colleges. 

At the New England Apple show, 
which was held at Manchester. N. H., 
Oct. 20th to ihe 22d Inclusive the 
M. A. C. judging and packing teams 
won first place in both the judging and 
the packing contests. 

There was a magnificient display of 
excellent fruit. The amount of fruit 
displayed was not large, but the quality 
was the best. In many of the exhi- 
bits it was a difficult matter for even 
old experienced pomologists to say 
which was the best. Some of the 
exhibits were undoubtedly the best 
that New England has ever produced. 
The show demonstrated that New 
England can produce fruit of the high- 
est quality, and that the New England 
fruit growers are realizing their oppor- 
tunities in apple growing and are tak- 
ing advantage of them. 

The contestants for the judging and 
packing teams, after looking over the 
exhibits, realized that skillful work 
would oe required In sucn a close 
competition. Every team went into 
the contest with the keenest enthus- 
iasm and a determination to place the 
fame of their Alma Mater at the front. 
The M. A. C. teams were confdient of 
winning, but realized that the contest 
would be a close one, and were right 
in diaognosing the situation. 

The colleges that had teams repre- 
sented in the contests were New 
Hampshire State, Connecticut State 
Maine State, and Massachusetts Ag- 
gie. 

According to the rules of the con- 
test, both the judging and packi g 
teams were to be composed of three 
men each, not necessarily the same 
three on both teams. Massachusetts 
went with a team of three men pre- 
prepared to do both packing and judg- 
ing, but on arriving found that the 
other colleges each had only two men 
that they could enter in the packing 
contest, and for that reason the pack- 
! ing teams consisted of two men only, 
! but the judging teams were each com- 
posed of three men. 

The competition between teams 
■ was close and keen, but the M. A. C. 
decidedly demonstrated their superior- 
ity over the other teams by taking first 
place in both the judging and the pack- 
| Ing contests, and the two men on the 
'' packing team tying with each other 
for the second highest Individual score 
I in packing, and one man on the judg- 
ing team (Jenks '11). tying for sec- 



Mr. C. H. White 'og Speaks on Free- 
dom and Service. 



In giving the outline of the plan for 
college extension work he said that 
there were great openings for college 
tralnrd men as leaders of singing In 
the country churches. The services 
J men, as teachers In the Sunday- 
Schools, as Superintendents and lead- 
ers In Bible study classes, were In 
great demand. Men are also needed 
badly to take charge of the social life 
In the church and community for the 
purpose of getting up entertainments, 
including speaking, readings and the 
like, In which men with the proper 
training can be of great help and 
assistance. 

For the men Interested In athletics 
are the problems of organizing and 
managing games for the boys In the 
vicinity and arranging schedules of 
games and meets. Intertown games 
are very interesting for boys and could 
be managed so as to do a great and 
lasting good for the children and others 
interested. Opportunity waits for col- 
lege men to grasp the situation and 
oDiain excellent training fu. theimoives 
and do great good to the people In the 
country communities and the men are 
well paid in the satisfaction obtained 
in such service. 



I Continued on pec* 4.] 



[Continued oa pat* 4) 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB. 

PROFESSORS WAUCH AND CRIBBEN 
GIVE ILLUSTRATED TALKS. 

At a meeting of the Stockbridge 
Club In French Hall Tuesday evening 
Oct., 18, 1910. Professor Waugh 
gave a talk on Agriculture In the South 
illustrated by lantern slides. He said 
that the men who have succeeded In 
southern agriculture are either north- 
ern men or foreigners as the native 
southerners are not capable either 
through Indolence or laziness, or both. 
Most of his views were taken tn Geor- 
gia, Florida and Louisiana. As a 
rule the southern gardens do not com- 
pare favorably with ours in the north, 
one reason for this Is that nearly 60$ 
of the people are negroes who do not 
live as a rule on boughten vegetables. 

Several of his pictures were of the 
old gray mule which does practically 
all of the work in the south to this day. 
Following this Mr. Gribben spoke on 
draft horses, dairy and beef cattle, and 
different cuts in meet. By means of 
the slides he compared breeds and in- 
dividuals for their several purposes and 
showing the good points In many re- 
cord breaking cows. Several choice 
cuts of beef were shown above the 
pictures of the animals which produced 
them. 






The College Signal, Tuesday, October 25, 19 10. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, 
HAROLD F. WILLARD. 1911, 
FRANK A. PROUTY. 1911. 
IRVING W. DAVIS, 1911. 



Editor-in-Chief. 

Managing Editor. 

Athletic Notea 

Alumni Notes. 



ALLYN P. BURSLEY, 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYALN.HALLOWELL.1912. Assistant Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912. College Notes. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Department Notes. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALLEN. 1911. Business Manager. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1 9 1 2 . Asst . Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURC. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN. Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, OCT. 25. No. 6 

The Sicnal wishes to express its 
appreciation of the results secured by 
the fruit judging team. To have the 
team secure first place in both fruit 
packing and fruit judging is indeed 
gratifying and reflects credit both upon 
the institution and the pomology 
course. In the issue two weeks ago 
the results of the stock judging team 
were commented upon and that our 
college teams should win another 
intercollegiate contest so shortly proves 
what possibilities there are for our 
teams in the future alcng the same 
lines. 



One would think, to see so many 
leave chapel on Friday noons, that 
either there must be many waiters or 
else that many cannot improve their 
singing and cheering. Now Professor 
Sumner is here for a definite purpose; 
that of coaching the students in sing- 
ing and it is up to everyone, who can, 
to profit by this opportunity. When it 
is realized that the Springfield Train- 
ing School game comes one week 
from Saturday, it is perfectly evident 
that preparations must be made, and 
after an exhibition such as was shown 
last year we will have to ex art our- 
selves to do better. But we can do 
better, — for the improvement this fall 
shows it ; so let everyone avail himself 
of the opportunity at Friday chapel. 



A noticeable detail concerning 
noon chapel is the tardiness of some 
students. To have many enter after 
the exercises begin is both annoying 
to the speaker and objectionable to the 
fellows as they are not able to hear the 
first announcements. Formerly the 
chapel bell rang continuously from 
eight o'clock until five minutes past 
the hour, allowing a period of but five 
minutes for assembling ; now the last 
recitation ends at ten minutes of 
twelve and chapel begins when the 
clock has finished striking the hour. 
During the present time of ten minutes 
given for gathering, of course the stu- 



dents must come from across the 
campus but ample time is allowed for 
everyone getting to chapel on time. 
Let us be prompt. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Oct. 2b. — 6-4b p. m. Stockbridge 
Club. 

7-00 P. m. Glee Club rehear- 
sal in chapel. 

Oct. 26.— 3-00 p. m. Assembly Dr. 
Joel E. Goldthwaite of Boston, 
M. A. C. '85. Phi Kappa 
Phi oration. 

Oct. 27.-6-45 p. m. Y. M. C A. 
chapel. 

Oct. 28.-4-45 p. m. Glee club re- 
hearsal in chapel. 
7-00 P. M. Debating club in 
chapel. 

Oct. 29.— Football. New Hampshire 
State college at Durham. 

Oct. 30.— 9-15 a. m. Sunday Talk. 
President R. Dewitt Mailary, 
American International college 
Springfield. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Richard F. Duncan '86, who has 
been in the South Sea Islands for the 
past few years, is visiting at college 
for a few days. 

The following offrcers were elected 
last night by those interested in public 
speaking: Irving C. Gilgore, president; 
Phileas A. Racicot. vice-president; 
Theodore J. Moreau, treasurer; 
Horace M. Baker, secretary. 

Tne Forestry class under Professor 
Moon has been spending the past week 
in the study of types of forests. Wild- 
wood cemetery is being type-mapped 
and the men are getting some excel- 
lent practice in practical work. 

At the New England Fruit show 
held in Manchester, N. H. last week, 
the Connecticut Agricultural college 
had on exhibit 150 varieties of apples. 
After the show these apples were given 
to M. A. C. and are to be used here 
in Senior pomology class work. 

Dr. Joel E. Goldthwaite of Boston 
will deliver the annual Phi Kappa Phi 
address at the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college Wednesday, Oct. 26th, 
at the assembly hour, 3-30. Dr, 
Goldthwaite is a graduate of the col- 
lege, of the class of 1885, and is now 
a prominent and successful physician 
in Boston. Dr. Goldthwaite 's subject 
will be "The Conservation of Human 
Energy." 

The Junior class in pomology is 
renovating the old orchard known as 
the Harlow orchard on East Pleasant 
street. Each man has been assigned 
a tree and he is to have charge of it 
until it has been brought into good 
bearing condition. Professor Sears 
has left for the Pacific cost where he 
will act as judge at an apple show at 
Vanconver, B. C. During his absence 
Messers. Shaw and Norman will have 
charge of his classes. 

Professor Sears left last Monday, 
Oct. 23rd, for Vanconver Island where 



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Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



KODAKS 



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C. R. ELDER 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 25, 1910. 



he will act as one of the judges at the attendance. The speakers at the 
Canadian National apple show, Tnis rally will be ex- Representative Robert 
show is supposed to be the largest of Luce of Somerville, Gov. Eben S. 
its kind in the world. More money Draper, Congressman Frederick H. 
will be offered in prizes than at any ' Gillett and J. Bernard Ferber of Bos- 
other show. Mr, H. E. Van Demon, , ton, assistant United States district 



of Worthington, will act as chief judge, 
Professor Greg of Corueii, Mr. W. H. 
Bunting of St. Catherines of Ontario; 
and Professor Seaas will act as three 
of his five assistant judges. 

After the Vancouver show Professor 
Sears will act as a judge at the 
Spolsone Apple show which will be held 
a week later. This show is the largest 
held on the western coast, and proba- 
bly the largest In the United Stares. 
While in the west Professor Sears will 
visit the fruit orchards of the middle 
west and those of Hood River Valley. 
Professor Sears will be away from col- 
lege about a month. Professors 
Waugh and Shaw will have charge of 
the Senior pomology class, while Pro- 
fessor Norman will conduct the Junior 
class. 

The Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
cordially invite you to be present 
at the 
Dedication 
of the 
New Building 
for 
Entomology and Zoology 
Friday afternoon, November the 
Eleventh 
Nineteen Hundred and Ten 

at 2 o'clock. 
Amherst, Mass. 



attorney. 



SATURDAY'S FOOTBALL 
SCORES 

At Cambridge, Harvard 12, Brown 0. 

At New Haven, Yale 0, Vanderbilt 0. 

At Williamstown, Dartmouth 39, Wil- 
liams 0. 

At Amherst, Bowdoin 3, Amherst 0. 

At Princeton, N. J., Princeton 6, 
Carlisle 0. 

At Ithaca, N. Y., Cornell 15, Ver- 
mont 5. 

At Worcester, Holy Cross 6, Colby 0. 

At Annapolis, Md., Navy 3, Virginia 
Tech 0. 

Medford, Springfield Training 
school 5, Tufts 0. 
Worcester, Worcester Tech 8, 
Renssalear 0. 

At Schenectady, N. Y., Wesleyan 6, 
Union 0. 

At Hartford, Trinity 9, Norwich 0. 



At 



At 



GLEE CLUB 

The final selection has been made 
for the Glee club which now consists 
of twenty members. Three rehearsals 
are being held each week and Mr. 
Sumner is getting the program ready 
for the first concert, which will be given 
in Montague on Dec. 19th. S. M. 
Jordan '13 has organized the Mando- 
lin club and will begin practice this 
week. The following are the mem- 
bers of the Giee club : 

First tenors — Castle '12, Pease and 
French '13, Mellon '14. Second 
tenors — Howe and F. A. Prouty 'II, 
Hills '12, Wood, Walker and Ward 
'14; First Basses— Smith Ml, Walker 
'12, Griggs, Cobb and Zabriskie ' 13 ; 
Secondbasses — Ells * 1 2, Clegg '13, 
Brown, Krieble, and Gibson '14. 

PLANS FOR THE RALLY 

Frank A. Hosmer, treasurer of the 
republican town committee, is solicit- 
ing funds to defray the expenses of the 
local campaign, and is meeting with 
generous response. The reception 
which will be given tonight to the gov- 
ernor and other speakers will 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

ZOOLOGY AND ENTOMOLOGY. 

The new building for the Depart- 
ments of Zoology and Entomology Is 
rapidly nearing completion. The 
Sophomore classes in Zoology have as 
yet had no laboratory work, but the 
laboratory in the new building is now 
ready and the classes will meet there 
this week for the laboratory work. 
The class in Junior Zoology will also 
meet in the new building this week. 
The part of the building to be used for 
Entomology is not yet ready foi use. 

POMOLOGY. 

The class in Junior Pomolgy has 
taken up the Harlow orchard north of 
the Owen place on East Pleasant 
Street and will endeavor to rejuvenate 
it as last year's class did with the 
Owen orchard. Pictures have been 
taken of every tree in the orchard, and 
others will be taken when the work is 
completed, so that comparisons may 
be drawn between the "before using" 
and "after using." 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

The new building for stock-judging 
is progressing rapidly. The foundation 
has been completed and the contractor 
is now pushing ahead on the walls in 
an endeavor to get the building com- 
pleted as scon as possible. This new 
building is situated just east of the 
barns, nearly opposite Mr. ForristaP's 
house. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

REST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Stylos are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
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Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



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The new world's record for altitude 
take in an aeroplane recently established 
place in the town hall after the rally, by Henri Wynmalen at Mourmelon has 
instead of the Amherst house, as it been officially recognized by the aero 
has been previously announced. An club of France. The new figures are 
escort of 24 officers from the battallion a shade better than those originally 
of the Massachusetts Agricultural col- given out. As Wynmalen is now ac- 
lege will attend as aids to the governor, credited with having reached an alti- 
The Springfield brass band will be in ; tude of 2800 meters, 9186 feet. 




The College Drug Store 



ASK YOUR 
STATIONER FOR 



Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
See our samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, (lass and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

"117" J>„ S7-63 Franklin Street, 

Ward s boston. 



VARSITY MEN 

and most of the upsi-rclassmen 
wear 

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DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



A I M. \. (' 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 25, 1910. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 25, 1910. 



COO LEY BROS. & CO. 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

[Continued from lint page] 



CLOTHIERS 

HATTERS 

FURNISHERS 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX SUITS 



faculty of the college. 

Captain Sharpe in accepting thanked 
the team for its fine support. He 
thanked Captain Martin, who made 
rifle shooting possible in the college 




1- ...v.- 



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WESTFIELD, 



MASS. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
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Call in and see our large assortment 
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decorations. 



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and also the students who maue mc 
trip to Washington possible by their 
financial support. Then, in behalf of 
the team, he turned the trophy over 
to H. W. Blaney, representing the 
students, for its safe-keeping. Mr. 
Blaney thanked the team for the honor 
which it had brought to the college by 
winning the trophy. He also stated 
that the Senate had decided, upon the 
approval of the Athletic Council, to 
give the members of the team an 
rMt. 

FRUIT JUDGING AND PACKING 

(Continued from pace I) 

ond highest individual score in judging. 

The highest individual score in 
packing went to Maine, and the high- 
est individual score in judging went to 
New Hampshire. The M. A. C. 
packing team was composed of Bar- 
rows Ml and Jenks Ml; the judging 
ing team was composed of Barrows 
Ml, Jenks Ml and Baker Ml. 

This victory, besides adding to the 
fame of the college, brings with it two 
handsome silver cups which will be the 
property of the college, and which will 
be added to our trophy collection. 



A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to wony 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
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Walt-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

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DR. FAUNCE ON "LONESOME- 
NESS." 

An address by President Faunce, of 
Brown, delivered before the students 
in their college chapel recently may 
well occupy space in our columns. It 
has a message for all of us. The fol- 
lowing outline of his address was 
printed in the Brown Herald of Oct. 1 4. 
"The lonely man is not an unknown 
figure In the modern college. The 
size of the college, its varied interests, 
its elective studies, its many compact 
organizations, all tend to lift some 
men Into prominence and responsibil- 
ity, and leave others In obscure cor- 
ners, chilly and lonesome. But what 
are some of the specific causes of this 
feeling? 

"The cause may be mainly physi- 
cal. An unsound body creates an 
unsound view of the universe. When 
the sewage system of the body Is 
clogged, when the blood runs thin and 
anaemic, a man's vision Is perverted, 
and he imagines himself alone when 
standing amid a host of friends. 

"Sometimes the cause is lack of 
intellectual' independence. The body 
may be perfect, but the character 
lacking in backbone. Men should be 
like Matthew Arnold's stars, 'Unaf- 
frightened by the silence around them, 
undistracted by the sights they see." 
They should put away morbid sensi- 
tiveness, desire for applause, the 
watching of one's own shadow, and 
simply do duty steadily and fearlessly. 
•Duty done is the soul's fireside.' 



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"The chief cause of isolation is lack 
of the altruistic attitude. A selfish 
life is always a lonely one. Jane 
Adams says that commercial life will 
never be what it should be until the j 
co-operation seen on the athletic field 
Is transferred to the commercial arena. 
The true athlete is not watching his 
shadow, listening for applause on the 
grandstand, wondering hew he looked 
when the camera was snapped upon 
him. He is flinging himself into the 
cause for which he plays. In athletic?. 
In study, in state and church he that 
loseth his life shali find it." 



INFORMAL ANNOUNCEMENT 



Tne following are sections from 
article ten of the fraternity conference 
constitution : 

VII. No man shall be allowed to 
attend an Informal without presenting 
his proper ticket. 

VIII. Inasmuch as the object of 
the fraternity conference is to promote 
better interfrat-rnity fellowship and 
feeling, no group of fraternity men 
shall have private booths, furnish 
flowers, or in any way break the dem- 
ocratic snirit of the lnformals. 

Sec. II. All stag dances shall be 
ten cents per danc-. 

Section seven really means that 
absolutely no credit will be allowed. 
In regard to the next section, such 
things as furnishing or serving suppers 
in the dormatories are objected to for 
several reasons ; it is difficult for the 
management to ptan for outside supplies 
and to know how many suppers are 
served and to be paid for, also the 
impression is conveyed that cliques 
prefer to be exclusive, which is not the 
spirit desired by the fraternity 
conference. 

E. M. Brown, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



SOCCER FOOTBALL 

The College Senate has authorized 
a series of interclass soccer football 
games to be held unler the direction 
of Dr. Reynolds. Dr. Reynolds is 
trying to arrouse an interest In this 
popular game so that the men that can 
not take part in the oth?r branches of 
athletics can have other means of 
outdoor exercises. This series will 
begin about the first Saturday in 
November and two games will be 
played every Saturday until each class 
has met each of the other classes 
once. The freshman team is already 
practicing and expect to play the Am- 
herst college freshmen at the end of 
the season. No varsity football man 
may compete for a soccer t am. 



COMMUNICATION 

(Communications to the Siomal concerning mat- 
ters of general Interest are welcomed. The Sigmal 
is not to be held responsible for the opinions thus 
expressed ) 

Prsident Kenyon L. Butterfield : 
My Dear President;— I take 
great pleasure in sending to you by 
express, today, the football that you 
have requested. I might say that this 
football was the one played with in the 
fall of 1902 with Dartmouth at Han- 
over, N. H. The game resulted in a 

to score. We were the only team 
that year upon whom Dartmouth did 
not score ar.d I believe the only team 
that Dartmouth did not beat. 1 am 
not certain, however, whether or not 
they were successful with Harvard but 

1 know they scored upon them. I 
only wish now that I had more of these 
trophies to send you and if we had only 
known, while at college, that M.A.C. 
was to have such a room, we would 
have a good many to fill it. 

Very truly yours, 

C. P. Hallican. 



College 5icnal needed by Library 
Volume 1909-10, numbers 22, 23, 
24, 25, 27, 28, 30, 31 and two copies 
of 32. 

C. R. Green. 



COMMUNICATION 

To the Editor, Collece Signal: 
Dear Sir: 

There is a certain matter which I 
wish to present to the undergraduates 
of M. A. C. and would like to hear 
discussion upon through the columns 
of the College Signal. It is the ques- 
tion of placing the Junior Prom, in a 
special "Junior Week" in May and 
abo ishing the Sophomore Senior 
Prom. This would mean only one 
Prom, in the year. My reasons for 
making this suggestion to the students 
at M. A. C. at this time are numer- 
ous. It is not a new idea but is in 
vogue in many well known colleges 
and appears to work well. One main 
reason is that two Proms, do not pay 
financially. One cannot go to the 
Junion Prom, in February without 
taking in the sleighride which is in 
itself as expensive for the fellows as 
the Prom, itself and after going to the 
Junior, few fellows can afford to go to 
the Sophomore -Senior. Again, the 
Sophomore Senior comes at a time 
when the men want to hurry home, 
and no June Prom, for years past has 
been a financial success. 

Now what may be said of the Prom, 
in May. Is there any more beautiful 
season of the year to bring your 
feminine friends to Amherst ? An 
entire week could be tun.ed over as 
Junior week when not only the Prom, 
but a Junior play, baseball game, glee 
club concert and perhaps fraternity 
picnics could come. To be sure this 
would be rather expensive but not as 
much so as two separate Proms. The 
Junior Prom, is perhaps the only time 
\ in four years when a man brings his 
particular friend to Amherst and cer- 
tainly a week in May is far preferable 
to any other time. 

It is time such a question was 
decided If it shall go into effect this 
year, as I hope it may, and before it 
shall be brought before the student 
body in a mass- meeting, it would be 
well to discuss its pros and cons in 
these columns. 

Very truly yours, 
Herbert W. Blaney 1911. 
Amherst, Mass., Oct. 24, 1910. 



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ALUMNI NOTES 

To the Alumni: 

A letter from a non-graduate alum- 
nus has been received by the secre- 
tary of the M. A. C. club of New 
York inquiring if his presence at the 
annual dinner at the St. Denis hotel 
on Dec. 2d would be acceptable. 
Owing to the fact that no list of the 
non-graduate alumni has been printed 
since 1897, a goodly number of these 
men could not be reached by notices 
sent out by the secretary, Dr. John A. 
Cutter. 262 West 77th St., New 
York city. All alumni whether grad- 
uate or non-graduate are welcome to 
these reunions, but owing to the strong 
probability of a very large attendance 
this year (over a hundred) it will save 
the officers much labor if the men 
wiil indicate whether attendance is 
possible or not. 

Plans are developing for the annual 
publication of the names and occupa 
tions of all alui>ni, graduate and n n- 
graduate. It is therefore necessary 
that the alumni in; rest themselves 
in sending in not oniv their own 
addresses and occupations, but also 
those of other alumni who are neglect- 
ful of their duty to their college. 
Such information snould be addressed 
to Ralph J. Watts, Amherst, Mass., 
Sec. M. A. C. Alumni Secretaries' 
association. 

Winfield Ayres, M. D., '86. 
Pres. M. A. C. Alumni See's. Assoc. 

'94. — Born on June 26, to Mr. and 
Mrs. E. D. White A Alliens, Ga., a 
son, Elias Doyle White, Jr. 

'94. — Dr. Charles Herbert Higgins, 
B. Sc, V. S., D. V. S., pathologist 
at the Experimental farm, has received 
word that he has been elected a Fel- 
low of the Royal Microscopical Society 
of London, England. This society is 
one of the most exclusive in the world, 
being confined to men who are en- 
gaged in microscopic work. There 
are only five other fellows of this soci- 
ety in Canada. The honor entitles its 
members to sign the initials F. R. M. 
S. after their names. Dr. Higgins 
was appointed to his present position 
Sept. 1, 1908, and althcugh only a 
young man has, by his brilliant 
achievements in pathological work, 
made his name known abroad. 

'95. — Born on Oct. 2, to Mr. and 
Mrs. W. L. Morse of New York city 
a son, Walter Harrison Morse. 

'95. — Professor E. A. White is 
the author of Bulletin 15 from the 
Connecticut State Geological and 
Natural History Survey. This bulle- 
tin, which was recently issued, con- 
tains Professor White's second report 
on the Hymeniales of Connecticut. It 
is beautifully illustrated with photo- 
graphs and makes an attractive hand- 
book on mushrooms. 

'04. — Dr. E. A. Bach is the author 
of Bulletin No. 64, Part VIII, of the 
Bureau of Entomology on "The 
Wooly White Fly." 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 25, 19 10. 



iti 



1 



AMHERST HOUSE 

BARBER 
SH0P-l» 



The SHOP THAT LEADS 



ALSO 



AGGIE SHOP 

NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



Wright 
& Ditson 

Football and Basketball suits 
the standard at all leading 
colleges. The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
( iuards the best and most pract- 
ical, also Skates and Hockey- 
Goods. The Wright & Dit- 
son Sweaters have 
long been recognized 
as the best. 




College Students and Athletes 
who \v;int the real, superior 
articles for the different sports 
w.«.p«T.or, should get the kind that bear 
our trade-mark. Catalogue Jree. 

WRIGHT & DI1 SON 

544 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

22 Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

76 Weybosset Street, Providence, R. I. 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



III. J. Laporte, Inc. 

Proprietors of 

HUrO— LIVEBY-HOBSE 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 

Tel. 183. 

BASSALOTTI & GENTASO 

FRUIT. 

CONFECTIONERY, 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

BRICKS TO TAKE HOME. 



CORNER AMITY & PLEASANT STREETS 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
> arnations, violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 



LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only Jrom 1 A. M. to 4 A. At. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 
& Pressing Rightly- 
Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. W. Blaney, '11, 

C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, E. L. Winn, 87 

Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursdays, 

Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays. 



'04, '09, '10.— There are three 
M. A. C. men connected with the 
Pennsylvania State college namely, 
Willis '09 in the Experiment Station, 
Waldron '10 in Department of Bot- 
and Gregg '04 in the Department of 
Horticulture. 

At a recent reception of the Sen- 
ior class four M. A. C. men were 
present, besides the three already 
mentioned, A. C. Monahan '00 of the 
U. S. Bureau of Agricultural Educa- 
tion, was in town. 

'05. — A. N. Swain who is a horti- 
culturist is Dorchester, visited college 
last week. 

'05. — Born on July 1, to Mr. and 
Mrs. P. F. Williams, a son. Mr. 
Williams was acting professor of Hor- 
ticulture at th-i Alabama Polytechnic 
institute for the yeu 1909-10 and h*s 
been appointed to a full professorship 
this year. 

Ex-'07. — Married Oct. 21, Herbert 
O. Russell of North Hadlry tj Miss 
Madeline Clarke of Marlboro. Mr. 
Russell is a large grower of and dealer 
in onions. 

'08.— F. A. Johnston is ill with 
malaria. 

'08. — J. W. Wellington. Assistant 
Horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station Lafayette, lnd. 

'08. — T. L. Warner, Coast and 
Geodetic Survey, Washington, D. C, 
visited college recently. 

'08.— Born on Sept. 30, to Mr. and 
Mrs. W. L. Howe of Marlboro, a 
daughter, Esther Lenora. 

'10. — Louis Brandt, Instructor in 
Landscape Gardening, University of 
Illinois. Address, Department of 
Horticulture, University of Illinois, 
Urbana, III. 

'10. — C. A. Oeutel, Expert Farmer, 
San Xavier Agency, Tuscon, Arizona. 
Mr. Oeutel'swork is in the Indian Ser- 
vice. He has a farm of sixty acres 
which he has to operate, as a model 
for the Indians to follow. He also has 
charge of building small reservoirs and 
repairing roads and bridges. This ter- 
ritory which he has charge of is about 
three-fourths the size of Massachu- 
setts and has a population of 4000 
Papago Indians. 



i . i i., 11 . ' . . ' ■ ■11 ■ 1 .. ■ . ■ . /. ' ■. — T" ' ■ , ■ ■ . ' . ., ." ■I ' . ' I'VH 1 , 

- - ?***£? 








With each package of 
Fatima you get a popu- 
lar adress' photograph 
— also a pennant cou- 
pon, 25 of which secure 
a handsome felt college 
pennant ( / 2x32) — *e- 
leciionof 100. 



■■y: 



TURKISH 

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Like bodies repel, 
while the unlike at- 
tract. Which accounts 
for the magnetic quali- 
ties of Fatima Ciga- 
rettes—they are totally 
unlike any others. 

They generate a current 
of favor, powerful in its at- 
traction of college students. 
Some day, some word will 
be coined to describe them. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 



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INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

The board of student representatives 
of Columbia has decided to discontinue 
interclass football. 

Undergraduates of Columbia have 
voted for a per capita tax of $8 for the 
support of athletics. 

Columbia has made arrangements 
for an exchange of professors with the 
University of Paris. 

At Wesleyan the Sophomores de- 
feated the Freshmen in their annual 
track meet by the score of 66-51 . 

A diphtheria epidemic at Hamilton 
College has necessitated the quaran- 
tine of 40 students rooming in Emerson 
Hall, and under this regimen no fur- 
ther cases have occurred. 



Harvard has employed Alfred 
Shrubb, the noted English distance 
runner, as coach for the cross country 
men. 

University of Missouri freshmen are 
forced to carry the suit cases of upper- 
classmen when they arrive on the 
trains. 

Columbia now ranks first among 
American colleges in enrollment. 
The total registration is 7,058, an in- 
crease of 456 over that of last year. 

The students of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology recently dis- 
approved the adoption of the honor 
system by practically a unanimous vote. 

The office of the college dean at 
Yale is sending out return postals to 
the seniors to obtain their average 
yearly expenditures for use in the 
official dealings of the office. 

Wesleyan recently voted to raise 
money for athletics by a tax of $15 on 
every undergraduate. The former 
method of selling season tickets failed 
to supply the needs of the teams. 

The Aero Club of the University of 
Pennsylvania will complete its first 
aeroplane very shortly. It Is ready to 
challenge any other university in the 
United States to an aviation contest. 

Minnesota and Dakota colleges have 
set the precedent of allowing baseball 
players to play summer baseball with- 
out losing their athletic standing in the 
college. 



FRANK S. 1 RIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND MACK 



Macks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 



8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, - - MASS. 

Telephone 



Great River Water Power Go. 

/•/. A.&'S.A. ALLEN, Props. 
Office, Gillett lllock. 

WESTFIED, MASS. 



ROOMS WITH HEAT, 
POWER <£ LIGHT 

FOR K I£ IV T 



Haled shavings put up in 
attractive shape, in car lots 

price: on application 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 25, 1910. 



Daniel Waldo Field, a millionaire 
shoe manufacturer, has entered Har- 
vard at the age of 45. 

Of the various football captains this 
year, fifteen are bdcks, five are ends, 
and nine are in the line. 

The income from the invested funds 
of Harvard College for the last fiscal 
year totals a million dollars. 

On Nov. 12th "Cap and Bells, "the 
Williams Dramatic association, will 
present the comedy "Seven-Seventy- 
Eight." 

The board of Trustees at the Uni- 
versity of Mississippi has voted to abol 
all Greek letter societies in that insti- 
tution. 

The fact that Dartmouth won the in- 
tercollegiate tracK meet at Brookline 
by a small margin, seems to favor the 
possibility of some one of the smaller 
colleges taking first place this coming 
spring. Wesleyan and Bowdoin are 
going to make a good bid for it. and 
Amherst, whose chances were sacri- 
ficed last vear, because many of her 
men were barred by faculty ruling, is 
making good work in scholarship her 
watchword. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Has started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 

FORESTRY, 



FOR SALE! 

Military Uniform in Fine Condition 

Will tit a fairly large fellow. 
The price is far below the cost of a new uniform. 

JOHN E. DUDLEY, JR. 

11 No. College 

WANTED 

BY THE 

Library of the Mass. Agr. College 



College Signal, March 22 and June 14, 
1910. 

Farm-Poultry, Feb. 1, 1908, 19:3. 

Farmers' Bulletins, 45, 70, 125, 321, 336, 
3 8 4- 

Mass. State Agr. Kxp. Station, Bulletins, 
1 — 14 inclusive. 

Wisconsin Agr. Exp. Station, Bulletin, 
140. 

Any of the above items will be grate- 
fully received. 

Cmaki.es R C.rkkn, Librarian. 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course .s open to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford a splendid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

Kknyon L. Butter ki emj, President. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 
JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

N:neteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 



Herbert W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

Leon E. Fagerstrom, Jr., Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill, President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

John E. Dudley, Jr., President 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLEX 



Boot & Shoes Repaired 



FIRST CLASS WORK 



Amherst, 



Mass. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 

F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 

COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. K. Roberts. 



CARS 



Leave AOQIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AQUIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mim. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Can at Reaaonsblc Kate* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, $2. Weekly, $r. 



TM COLLEGE SIGNAL 



C* 



Vol. XXI. 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 1, 19 10. 



No. 7 



FOOTBALL 

No Score Game with New Hampshire 
State College at Manchester. 

Last Saturday our football team 
played a to game against New 
Hampshire State college at Manches- 
ter. The game was not a very inter- 
esting one from the spectators' stand- 
point, each team being penalized a 
great deal for holding, Massachusetts 
once being penalized when only 15 
yards from New Hampshire's goal. 

Massachusetts executed several for- 
ward passes in the last quarter that 
resulted in long gains. Brackett, the 
New Hampshire quarterback, also 
tried several forward passes that quar- 
ter but, with the exception of one, all 
of them were declared illegal. 

Swasey, of New Hampshire, made 
a 40 yard gain around the end and 
Brackett made one of 45 yards 
through a broken field. Morse showed 
up very well for Massachusetts in his 
forward passes, running back of punts 
and quarterback runs. 

The summary: 

M. A. C. 

Larsen, re 
Powers, rt 
Walker. Hayden, rg 
Johnson, c 
Hubert, Ig 
Samson, It 
Lane, le 
Morse, qb 



SUNDAY MORNING TALK THE NEW BUILDING 



NEW HAMPSHIRE, 

le, Clarke 
It, Sanborn 
Ig, Morgan 
c. Perkins 
rg, Davison 
rt, Pettingill 
re. Pond 
qb, Brackett 
Goodnough, Williams, rhb lhb, Jones, Loud 
Huntington, Smith, lhb 

rhb, Robinson, Swasey 
Brewer, fb fb. Reardon, Haines 

Umpire— Foley of Amherst. Referee— 
lngalls of Brown. Field judge— Brice of 
Manchester. Linesman — Carpenter. Time 
— 15 min. quarters. 



THE TUFTS GAME 

The Tufts game conies Saturday 
and we want it. Coach Gildersleeve 
says that now is the time to win it. 
Tufts is in hard luck with men in the 
hospital and others declared Ineligible. 
The chances are equal. The only 
comparison is by means of scores with 
Maine. Tufts lost to Maine 11-6. 
We lost to Maine 29-2. Nothing can 
be foretold by means of comparative 
scores however. The probable lineup 
will be as follows : — 
Turrs. 



Webster or Dunn, le 
Costauza, It 
Russell, lg 
Winship, c 
Tattau, rg 
Merrill, rt 
Richert. re 
Cohlln, qb 
Kewer. lhb 
Dittrick. rhb 
Houston or Ellms. fb 



MASSACHUSETTS, 

re. Larsen 

rt. Powers 

rg. Walker 

c, Johnson 

lg. Hayden 

It. Samson 

le. Lane or O'Brien 

qb, Morse 

rhb, Goodnough 

lhb, Huntington 

fb. Brewer 



President R. DeWitt Mallery of the 
American International College 
Speaks on " Social Re- 
generation. 

The speakrr at the Sunday morning 
talk was R. DeWitt Mallary, President 
of the American International college 
at Springfield. Taking for his subject 
The Social Regeneration of the Immi- 
grant Races of America, he said In 
part : 

All races are in need of social uplift or 
regeneration. That is, they should 
have the proper education to fit them 
for the higher walks of life. That is 
the problem in America today. Every 
month hordes of illiterate Immigrants 
enter this country, whose duty it is to 
make these newcomers love and 
respect their new home. Formerly, 
as in the colonial period, special 
inducements were offered to promote 
immigration Nearly all such immi- 
grants speedily became good citizens. 
Today, however, the conditions are 
reversed; we are receiving more 
immigrants than we can assimilate 
properly and 80 per cent, of these are 
illiterate and ignorant concerning all 
things, save the value of money. 
Many of these immigrants stay here 
just long enough to accumulate what 
is a small sized fortune in their own 

land. 

Although this foreign invasion is a 
peaceful one it is fast becoming a 
menace to American citizenship, the 
foundation of this republic, a menace 
that can be abated by one thing only, 
social regeneration. That is, the 
immigrant must become thoroughly 
imbibed with the principles of demo- 
cracy and the standards of citizenship. 
This can be accomplished by educa- 
tion and it is the work of the Ameri- 
can International college at Springfield, 
the only college of its kind in the coun- 
try, to instil these principles of demo- 
cracy and citizenship into the minds of 
the illiterate immigrants. With this 
purpose in view, the most important 
courses in the curriculum are those on 
Civil Government, Citizenship and 
English. Although it is intended for 
immigrants too old for the public 
schools, many of the students are 
young men who want to enter those 
walks of life from which they have been 
barred. 



Equipment and Plans for New Entomo- 
logical Laboratory. To be Ded- 
icated November nth. 



The new building for entomology 
and Zoology, which is to be dedicated 
on the afternoon of Nov. I Ith, is now 
almost completed, and presents a very 
pleasing appearance. With the appro- 
priation made for its equipment by the 
last Legislature, the usual office fur- 
niture has been obtained, and in addi- 
tion, the desks and other equipment 
for the laboratories, including a num- 
ber of excellent microscopes, both dis- 
secting and compound, and other 
apparatus for direct use by the stu- 
dents. The electric fixtures which are 
now in place are very attractive, and 
so located and arranged as to excel- 
lently Illuminate the building. The 
cases for the specimens in the zoologi- 
cal museum are nearly complete, and 
the specimens are now being trans- 
ferred from South college. The insect 
collection cases still lack doors, but 
otherwise, are finished. The amphi- 
theater has now been equipped with 
chairs, 153 of which have been put in 
place, and twenty more can be added, 
as more prove necessary. Each chair 
is supplied with a mental arm, lying 
vertically at the side of the seat, which 
can be pulled forward and then turned 
at right angles, to serve as a support 
for note books during lectures. Black 
boards, lecture room desks, book 
cases, etc., are being rapidly put in 
place, and the contractor's sheds have 
now been removed from in front of the 
building. Grading will be begun very 
shortly, and it is hoped to have the 
grounds in something like good order 
before winter sets in. 

The dedicatory exercises will consist 
of an historical address on the Depart- 
ments of Zoology and Entomology at 
M. A. Cm by Dr. W. E. Hinds '99, 
who in 1902, received the first Doctor's 
degree conferred by the college, and 
the dedicatory address by Dr. L. O. 
Howard, United States Entomologist, 
of Washington, D. C. In addition to 
these addresses, there will be brief 
remarks by one or two other speakers, 
after which the building will be thrown 
open to the public for inspection. 



PHI KAPPA PHI ORATION 



Dr. Joel E. Ooldthwait, '83, Speaks on 
'• The Conservation of Hu- 
man Energy." 

Last Wednesday the assembly hour 
was given over to the Phi Kappa Phi 
fraternity. Dr. Lindsey opened the 
the hour by reading the following de- 
clarations of that fraternity: "The 
Phi Kappa Phi Fraternity is a College 
and Alumni Society con .posed of honor 
graduates of all departments of Ameri- 
can Colleges and Universities. It 
stands for the Unity and Democracy 
of Education. Its general object Is 
to unite college graduates of high 
mark without regard to department, 
course of study or sx, for the ad- 
vancement of the highest scholarship. 
The fraternity selects Its regular 
members from the best students within 
one year of the completion of a Bach- 
elor or higher degree course. The 
number taken each year Is limited to 
one-third of any course or department. 
The membership is thus a college 
honor, all the more prized because It is 
Intercollegiate. It elects to honorary 
membership distinguished workers in 
science, literature and education. 

In its plan of organization this fra- 
ternity is modeled in some respects 
after the Phi Beta Kappa, a society of 
age and dignity, but is broader in its 
scope. The Phi Beta Kappa was 
founded when only one kind of col- 
lege was known— the classical college 
and does not grant chapters to insti- 
tutions of scientific or technical charac- 
ter and wishes to confine membership 
to those who win the B. A. degree. 

The Phi Kappa Phi has been organ- 
ized to provide a graduate fraternity in 
accord with the ideas and methods of 
modern education, and, therefore, In- 
cludes all departments of learning. 

Dr. Lindsey also stated that out of 
eighty-seven Phi Kappa Phi men that 
have graduated from this college he 
was acquainted, personally or by repu- 
tation, with eighty of them and they all 
had "made good." 

The number taken each year is 
limited to oue-third of any course or 
department. These men were chosen 
fron the class of 1911: Egbert Nor- 
ton Davis of Sherborn, Samuel Ray- 
nolds Parsons of North Amherst, and 
Percy William Pickard oi Hopedale. 
Dr. Lindsey than introduced Dr. 



We can make the chances better 
than even, by sending a delegation 
down to the game to encourage the 
team by cheers and songs. 



The women at Syracuse are to hold 
a track meet. Their practice is held 
every afternoon on a special athletic 
field. Last year several promising 
track athletes were developed, and the 

, meet formed an important part of the 

I year's program. 



At the regular meeting of the 

Dramatic society on Wednesday night Joel E. Goldthwait, who gave a very 

the following men were elected : Good- Interesting lecture on the Conserva- 
inough and Moir '13. Wilde '12, F. I tlon of Human Energy. 
! W. Read and Simmons '14. There Each individual has a certain 

are now nineteen vacancies in the j amount of energy stored up in his 
1 society and any fellow who has good body. This energy was put there for 
! dramatic ability Is invited to become a 

member. 



a purpose, to do work and to do hard 



■ 
,1 



[Continued on p*c« 4.J 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November i, 1910 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 1, 1910. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

— • 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

EDGAR M RROWN. !9!1, Editor !r. Chief. 

HAROLD F. WILLARD, 1911, Managing Editor. 
FRANK A. PROUTY. 1911. Athletic Notea. 

IRVING W. DAVIS. 1911. Alumni Notea. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY, 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYAL N.HALLOWELL, 1912, Aaslstant Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912. College Notea. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT, 1912. Department Notea. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALLEN, 1911, Buainess Manager. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. I 9 1 2, Asst. Buaineaa Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURC. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN. Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered aa aecond-claaa matter at the Amherst 
Poat Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, NOV. 1. No. 7 



Attention has been called to the 
fact that upon days when scrimmage 
is held, no one is present with proper 
medicinal supplies for any injured 
player. A few minor injuries were 
received last week and the players 
either left the field or continued the 
game without assistance. A more 
adequate rendering of aid would be 
greatly appreciated by the players and 
students. 



The assembly address of last 
Wednesday was the most instructive 
and beneficial of this year's talks. 
Such an address as was Dr. J. E. 
Goldthwaite's is greatly appreciated, 
because it showed an important need 
of the present day college man. The 
laxness of the average college student 
along certain lines of physical training 
is often from ignorance rather than 
carelessness and to have defects 
pointed out and illustrated is especially 
desirable. Moreover, when the rem- 
edy is simple and of direct application 
the needs of a student, individually, 
are more fully met. 



The Signal wishes to voice the 
sentiment of the student body, which 
was very assertive Saturday and Sun- 
day in declaring that the returns from 
all athletic contests, whether victories 
or defeats, should immediately be 
made known to them. A telegram 
sent to the assistant manager, or If he 
should be away from college, to the 
president of the senate, would be quick 
and the student body would be assured 
of its authenticity. The interest with 
which they awaited the score of Satur- 
day's game proves that the moral 
support is behind the teams which 
they back financially. 



Occasionally remarks are made to 
the editor concerning the Signal's 
policy and attitude toward different j 
matters of college interest. Again 
those remarks are more pointed and I 



questions are asked, "Why don't you 
do this or that?" or "Why don't you 
knock this member of the faculty?" 
or "If I were you I would do such and 
such a thing." Probably so, but 
maybe not. 

Do the criticiscrs consider that the 
columns of the Signal are open and 
free to all communicators? Some do 
and some do not. A few believe or 
pretend to believe that the paper is 
controlled by certain individuals, who 
will allow nothing in it which they do 
not desire. Still others, who know 
differently, are not willing to send 
signed communications for publication 
in the college paper. They would be 
perfectly willing to contribute articles 
but they would not care to make pub- 
lic their origin and would like to have 
the editor held responsible for their 
contents. 

Now as a student organ the paper 
should be devoted to the best interests 
of the students, and anyone who wishes 
to voice his sentiments publicly has 
that privilege. The articles must, of 
course, be proper and their author be 
made known. The chance for the 
expression of personal opinion is open 
to all. Students, alumni and faculty 
are invited to make known their opin- 
ions upon all questions or phases of 
college activities. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

The Republican rally Tuesday night 
called out a good sized crowd of stu- 
dent supporters. 

Dr. P. L. Reynolds has been mak- 
ing efforts to have class soccer football 
teams organized. 

Winter is coming! There was a 
thin coat of ice on the college pond 
last Sunday morning. 

Four members of the Glee club sang 
at a chicken-pie supper at the Method- 
ist church last Friday evening. 

The C. S. C. fraternity held a house 
warming at their new quarters on 
Pleasant street Wednesday evening. 
Several alumni in C. S. C. were 
present. 

On Monday afternoon the Senior 
class in Floriculture visited several 
greenhouses in this vicinity. The Mt. 
Holyoke greenhouses, the Joseph 
Beach greenhouses at South Hadley 
and the George Sinclair greenhouses 
at Holyoke. 

The following men have been elected 
from the Junior class to serve on the 
Junior Prom, committee : A. C. Brett, 
S. Williams, F. B. Hills, J. M. 
Heald, J. Carpenter Jr., J. E. Pier- 
pont, H. C. Walker, W. R. Bent, R, 
T. Beers, J. A. Harlow. 

A goodly number enjoyed the Metta- 
wampe trek of last Saturday over Bear 
mountain. The trampers were the 
guests of the Amherst gun club late in 
the afternoon at the reserve of the gun 
club in South Amherst, where a camp 
fire supper was eaten. The trek was 
notable as Ladies' Day. 



UP -TO- DATE 



FOOTWEAR 



PUMPS 



ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 



TENNIS SHOES 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



KODAKS 



EASTMAN'S FILMS 

PHOTOGRA PHIC 

SUPPLIES 



•s 



Drug Store 



THURBER'S 

COLLEGE LUNCH 



AMIIICWNT. MAHH. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



CAP & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



The Prospect House 



Good Board and 
Clean, Airy Rooms 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



Nov. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notlcaa (or thla column should be dropped in the 
Sighal Office or handed to E. M. Brown ' 1 1 , on or 
before the Saturday preceding each Issue] 

1. — 6-45 p. m,, Stockbridge 

club. 

7-00 p. m., Dramatic club 

rehearsal, chapel. 

. O-OU f. M., naitiiiui;, 

Student Mass meeting, chapel. 
3._6-45 p. M., Y. M. C. A., 
chapel. 

7-00 p. m., Dramatic club 
rehearsal, Drill hall. 
4. — 7-00 p. m., Debating club, 
chapel. 

5. — Football Tufts at Medford. 
6. — 9-15 a. M., Sunday talk, 
Rev. F. E. Tower, Law and 
Order League, Albany, N. Y. 



Nov. 



Nov. 



Nov. 

Nov. 
Nov. 



GOVERNOR'S STAFF VISITS 
COLLEGE 



On Tuesday the college was visited 
by six members of the Governor's staff. 
Governor Draper and Henry Cabot 
Lodge were expected to inspect the 
college but on account of certain 
inconveniences which arose they were 
detained in Northampton. The mem- 
bers of the staff, however, arrived and 
were entertained by President Butter- 
field and several of the heads of the 
departments. Their visit was obliged 
to be made shorter than was intended 
and the visitors were unable to stay 
and witness the battalion review as 
they had expected. The purpose of 
the visit to Amherst was to attend the 
Republican rally held in the Town hall 
on Tu sday evening. The Governor 
arrived in time to give an address at 
the rally and was escorted by the com- 
missioned officers of the M. A. C. 
battalion. The members of the staff 
who visited the college were as fol- 
lows -. District No. 1, Charles O. 
Brightman of New Bedford; District 
No. 2, J. Stearns Cushing of Nor- 
wood; district No. 3, William F. 
Murray of Boston; district No. 4, 
Walter S. Glidden of Somerville ; dis- 
trict No. 5, William H. Gove of 
Salem; district No. 8, August H. 
Goetting of Springfield ; Executive 
Secretary, Edward F. Hamlin of 
Newton. 



mid-year examinations are over. Any 
one who has not succeeded in making 
the "Private Secretary" cast, stands 
a good chance of making the cast of 
the succeeding play. The society has 
a membership of forty. At present it 
numbers twenty-one , consequently there 
are nineteen vacancies. In a college 
of four hundred students, ouglii 'mere 
not to be at least forty men interested 
in dramatics to the extent that they will 
come out and try to make the society? 
Other colleges smaller than M. A. C. 
support excellent dramatic clubs. Why 
should not we ? The management is 
doing its best to give it a firm founda- 
tion but the cooperation of the entire 
student body Is needed and without this 
the society can never be a success. 
The cast selected is as follows : 

Mr. Marshland, M.F.H. Moir'13 

Harry Marshland, (his 
Nephew,) 

Mrs. Cattermole, 

Douglas Cattermole (her 
Nephew, 

Rev. Robert Spaulding, 

Mrs. Sydney Gibson, 

(Tailor of Bond St. ,) Simmons ' 1 4 

John, (a Servant,) Nickerson '1 1 

Knox, (a Writ Server.) Read ' 1 4 

Edith Marshland, (Daugh- 
ter to Mr. Marsh- 
land,) Goodnough '13 

Eva Webster, (her friend 

and companion,) Wilde '12 

Mrs. Stead. (Douglas's 

landlady,) Robinson '1 1 

MissAshford, Hills' 12 

Scene — London and vicinity. Time 
— Present. 

Rehearsals are being held on Tues- 
days and Thursdays and will continue 
to be held on these days throughout 
the year except when occasion de- 
mands a change. Trips to several 
Massachusetts towns are being plan- 
ned and a production will be given in 
Amherst early in the coming winter. 



Dudley ' 1 I 
Zabriskie '12 

Sharpe ' 1 1 
Jordon '13 




DRAMATICS 



The time has now come when a 
dramatic society is an essential factor 
at M. A. C. Such a society has been 
formed and rehearsals are being held 
preparatory to the production of a play. 
The play decided upon is a three act 
farcical comedy entitled "The Private 
Secretary. " The cast has been selec- 
ted and from the present outlook, we 
ought to give a first class production. 
The society does not intend to limit 
itself to the presentation of one play 
during the course cf a year, but if 
possible two plays will be produced. 
Rehearsals for the second play will 
probably start immediately after the 



BASSALO TTI & GENTASO 

FRUIT. 

CONFECTIONERY. 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

BRICKS TO TAKE HOME. 



CORNER AMITY & PLEASANT STREETS 



Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 

Tailors. 



C&rp*rvter & Morehous?, 

PRINTERS, 



No. i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 




YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 



is 8 Cigarettes 



TOBACCO 



AT 




The College Drug Store 



ASK YOUR 
STATIONER FOR 



Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
See our samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

117 J»_ c 7 -6* Franklin Street, 

Ward s boston. 



ALL OF THE 

VARSITY MEN 

and most of the upserclassmen 
wear 

HAND KNIT 

Shaker Sweaters 

"THERE IS A REASON." 






EDWARD l_. HAZEN, '14 



AHKNT FOR 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



AT M. A. C. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November i, 1910. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 1, 19 10. 



COOLEY BROS. & CO. 



ASSISTANT COACH 



CLOTHIERS 

HATTERS 

FURNISHERS 



HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX SUITS 



WESTFIELD, 



MASS. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



George B. O'Hearn to Aid Coach Gil- 
dersleeve. 

George E. O'Hearn graduated from 
Massachusetts in 1904. In 1903 he 
was captain and end on the football 
t»!im anH u/a<s qWr> cantain of the ha*e- 
ball team. Mr. O'Hearn has been 
coaching at William and Mary College 
in Virginia this fall, and developed an 
excellent line. Coach Gildersleeve 
has been sadly in need of a man to 
aid him in coaching the line as his 
efforts have been directed to develop- 
ing a scoring machine with the back 
field. We are very fortunate in 
securing the services of Mr. O'Hearn 
just at this time In the season, before 
our big games, The men have been 
thoroughly drilled on the new rules and 
are now in a position to receive the 
greatest amount of good from the 
coaching. Mr. O'Hearn is a hard 
worker himself and isgetting good hard 
work from the men so that his efforts 
should begin to tell by the next game. 
The student body must stand behind 
the coaches and with the team for the 
remaining weeks of the season. 




jgoiH 



i 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



M. D. OILMAN. C A. MOFFET. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

IN 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Maim Street. 

Worcester, Mass. 



A GOOD THING 

It's a cr<»nH thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



Clapp, '12. 



Beers, '12. 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY. 

[Continued from first p»ge] 



H. W. FIELD 

... FWORIST ... 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



OPP. ACADEMY OF MUSIC, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



CAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



work. In order to carry on the hard 
work of life we all should [conserve this 
energy as much as possible, develop 
our bodies and habits so that in all our 
movements we use as little of this 
stored energy as possible. Our bodies 
should be held straight. A man with 
stooping shoulders wastes more energy 
in starting to walk than a straight 
shouldered man, it takes him longer to 
get started. When he is in a stooped 
position his heart is cramped for space, 
it cannot beat its full measure but 
must beat faster in order to keep up 
the flow of blood; his stomach drops, 
this hinders digestion for the blood 
cannot pass through the alimentary 
tract. All of these show loss of energy 
that can be prevented just by keeping 
our bodies in an upright position. 

During the course of the lecture Dr. 
Goldthwait showed interesting pictures 
of the Greek Gods, taken from ancient 
staturary, also of noted men who have 
done great things during their life 
such as Lincoln, Sherman, Washing- 
ton and Weston. All of these pictures 
showed the straight body and carriage, 
proving the conservation of their energy. 

Pictures were shown of patients at 
the tuberculosis hospitals, every one 
had the characteristic stoop shoulder 
pose, showing a cramping of the in- 
ternal organs. 

If the individual will take care of his 
body in such ways as to conserve all 
the energy that is possible a greater 
amount of work can be done and at a 
less cost to the human body. 

The University of Wisconsin has a 
correspondence study department which 
has grown during the past two years 
from 79 to 3, 859 .students. 



Freshmen 

Take 

Notice 

We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



j«E. N. PARISEAU,j» 

HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



RAZORS HONED 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherit Houm will receive 
prompt attention. 



RIFLE TEAM REPORT 

To the Editor, Collece Signal: 
Dear Sir: 

It was only last week that I suc- 
ceeded in getting a full statement re- 
lating to all expenses incurred by the 
rifle team for the indoor and outdoor 
intercollegiate rifle meets including the 
expense of sending our rifle team to 
Washington last June. 

Below I give a full account of all re- 
ceipts and expenditures to date and 
trust you will be able to print same in 
some early Issue of the Signal. 

receipts. 
From 53 of the Alumni 

outside of Amherst, $109 80 

Amherst Alumni, 16 00 

From Faculty, collected 
by Mr. Sharpe, $8 15 
" " Baker, 8 50 

•• •• Lloyd, 3 50 

** •' Capt. Martin, 5 00 25 15 
Student body, 62 75 

Roger Sherman Eddy, 25 00 

Capt. Martin, 30 00 



Total, 

EXPENSES. 

Expense of sending 
team to Wash- 
ington, $160 92 
Expense of coach, 74 50 
Board of coach, 20 60 
Ammunition, 15 90 
6 Micrometers, 15 00 
Carpenter & More- 
house, 8 25 
Postage, envelopes, 

stamps, etc., 17 49 

Telegrams and Tel- 
ephone messages I 29 



$268 70 



$313 95 



As the above account shows there is 
a deficit of $45.25. 

At my office I have an itemized ac- 
count of all receipts and expenditures, 
including a list showing all contributors 
and amount given by each. I shall be 
glad to have this account properly 
audited by some proper authority and 
the same be open for the inspection of 
all. 

Respectfully yours, 
Geo. C. Martin, 
Captain U. S. Army, retired, 

Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

71. — L. B. Caswell is a member 
of the committee appointed to man- 
age the 150th anniversary of the 
incorporation of the town of Athol. 

73.— By the death of Prof. D. P. 
Penhallow last Wednesday on board 
the steamer Lake Manitoba, just 
arrived in Liverpool from Montreal, 
the Agricultural college loses one of 
its most distinguished alumni. Dr. 
Penhallow graduated in the class of 
1873. After a year's service as rail- 
road engineer he spent three years in 
post-graduate work in botany and as 
assistant in the chemical department 



LABORATORY FERTILIZERS 

There are forms of nitrogen in the market which are more 
or less inert, including many so-called tankages or bloods, which 
are dried and ground, either separately or mixed with good tank- 
age or dried blood, and sold to ,,r y mixers or home mixers as 
tankages, much as a little (ream used to be mixed with oleo- 
margarine to give it the aroma and taste of butter. These, if 
only " dry mixed," while giving goods that may show up well 
in the laboratory, do not show up well in the field, for they have 
not been properly cooked, as it were ; and ifter all, it is the fold 
test which tells the story. The practical farmer who is growing 
quick crops for quick returns wants goods that will act during 
the current season. He considers the following season when he 
gets to it. 

"For the Land's Sake" Study the Plant Food Problem. 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



I. TH. LABROVITZ 

THK 

Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits and Overcoats To Order 
Always a large and select line of Foreign and Domestic Woolens. 

Dyeing, Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing a Specialty 

A guaranteed fit in all the latest kinds of garments. 

Renovated Suits For Sale. 

A first class line of Gent's Furnishing Goods always on hand. F. & VV. 

Collars and Dress Shirts. Satisfaction guaranteed in every transaction 






1 1 Amity Street, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Tel. 302-4. 






THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 

Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 

WORKS, 17th STREET A LEHIGH A VENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




THE H. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



STAMFORD, CONN. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November i, 1910. 




». • • • • • • • • • . ., », •, •, ... •, *. » - x A AAAAAA 

• •. * • • • • * • • ..»..».... . . 



GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 



THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 



AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



>;:•:>:>:>:. >:.:«. X.. :.•;.>. >:...• 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE OLD CORP DRUG STORE. 

COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



J. H. TROTT 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



STEAM KITTING, Telephone 59-4- 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

A Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave, AMHERST. MASS 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 
OtolHA.M.l.aOtoSP.M. 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R. BROWN 
Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, - - • Mass. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



Olvmpia Candv Go. 



257 Main St., 
Northampton, 



Mass. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



of the Agricultural college. In 1876 
he accompanied President W. S. 
Clark to Sapporo, Japan, and spent 
four years there as professor of botany 
and chemistry in the imperial college 
of agriculture, serving the last year as 
acting president. He had charge of 
the summer school of botany at Harv- 
ard in 1881. Since 1882 he has 
been professor of botany in McGill 
university, Montreal. He has been a 
voluminous writer on scientific sub- 
jects and was a member and officer in 
many learned societies. 

Ex- 76.— Edward S. Ellis, Bourne, 
attorney-at-law, also special justice 
First District Court of Barnstable. 

Ex-'80.— Horace W. Atwood. B.S. 
Maine State, D. V. S. American Vet- 
erinary college, for years a veterina- 
rian of high repute in eastern Massa- 
chusetts and actively associated with 
manufacturing realty and civic inter- 
ests, died in 1903 in Brockton. 

'87. —James M. Marsh has been 
elected a member of the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Ex-'97.— John R. Eady, Tongue 
River Agency, Lamedeer, Mont., 
writes : "If you ever happen Montana- 
ward, remember the name and drop 
in to see your friend ; we hold the 
Indians in place up here but with a 
very unsteady hand." 

'03. — A recent issue of the Boston 
Sunday Globe contains nearly a full 
page account of the work of Prof. H. 
J. Franklin at the cranberry experi- 
ment station in East Wareham. The 
article is illustrated by several excel- 
lent half-tones but gives "Ben" the 
credit of being a Harvard man. 

'04. — Ernest A. Bach, state ento- 
mologist of Virginia and entomologist 
to the Virginia State Experiment 
Station, Blacksburg, Va. 

'06.— A. H. M. Wood has suc- 
ceeded in turning a typical run-down 
New England farm at Easton, into a 
productive condition. 

'07. — C. M. Parker, Brookfield, 
when last summer his steamer was 
entering the lock to the harbor of 
Amsterdam, heard a cornetist on the 
bank play "Our glorious college days 
are o'er." 

'07. — C. B. Thompson is manager 
for a rubber planting company and is 
now located at Malang, East Java. 

'07. — Clinton King, lawyer. Rooms 
611-613, 6 Racon Street, Boston. 

'08.- — D. W. Farrar who is recovering 
from a critical experience with typhoid, 
hopes to be working in November, 
Address Twin Falls, Salmon River 
Land and Water Co., Royerson, 
Idaho. 

'08. — Roland M. Verbeck, Kozat 
Falls, Me., principal of Parsonfield 
seminary and introducing special 
I courses in agriculture. 

'08,— F. A. Johnston, Virginia 
Truck Experiment Station, Norfolk, 

IVa, 



AMHERST HOUSE 

BARBER 
SH0P-»o 



The SHOP THAT LEADS 



ALSO 



AGGIE SHOP 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



Wright 
&Ditson 

Football and Basketball suits 
the standard at all leading 
colleges. The Wright 6f 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
( iuards the best and most pract- 
ical also Skates and Hockey 
Goods. The Wright & Dit- 
son Sweaters have 
long been recognized 
as the best. 




College Students and Athletes 
who want the real, superior 
articles for the different sports 
u.» p.t orr should get the kind that bear 
our trade-mark. Catalogue free. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

22 Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

76 Weybosset Street, Providence, R. 1. 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



pi. J. Lapte, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



BUT 0— L1VEBY— H B S E 

Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 

Tel. 183. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November i, 1910. 



FLORICULTURE 



DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



37 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



'09. — C. R. Webb visited friends 
about College last week. 

'10. — Dickinson, Hosmer, Blaney 
and Mendum have visited the college 
during the past week. 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only Jrom 1 A. M. to 4. A. M. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

One-twentieth of the students at 
Pennsylvania are from foreign 
countries. 

The sum of $1 ,200 has been voted 
at Harvard for the development of 
minor sports. 

In 1908 there were 464 universities, 
colleges and technical schools in the 
United States. 

Two styles of freshman head-gear 
are worn at Cornell — a skull cap and 
in winter a tcque. 

The musical clubs at Cornell are 
planning a long western trip for the 
Christmas vacation. 

The total registration of 5,673 men 
for the present year at Minnesota out- 
numbers last year's registration by 300. 

Colby College, Watervlile, Me., has 
a registration of 158 in the freshman 
class, an increase of 50 over last 
year's number. 

A blanket with the letter "I" on it is 
awarded to the track men of Illinois 
who have won their varsity htter two 
years in succession. 

For the first time in seven years the 
senior class at Amherst will publish a 
senior class book containing pictures, 
records, statstics, history and other 
customary data. 

The sophomore class at Amherst 
has voted to withhold the publication 
of the Olio, the college year book, 
until their senior year, combining it 
with the senior class book. 

The new Agricultural hall at Cor- 
vallis, Oregon, has been completed and 
is now being occupied. It contains 
42 class rooms and laboratories and 
was erected at a cost of $40,000. 

A Freshman Class Book is to be 
issued by the Harvard freshmen this 
year. This will be the first time that a 
book of this sort has ever been pub- 
lished in the University by any but the 
senior class. 

Students of Dartmouth are only al- 
lowed to carry fifteen hours of recita- 
tions a week. In case a student takes 
more than this amount, he receives 
credit only for the fifteen hours in 
which he has the highest standing. 

The Minnesota Daily says that the 
business men of Minneapolis are be- 
coming alarmed at the constant rumors 
of wholesale cheating and cribbing in the 
universities and colleges during exami- 
nations. For year by year an increas- 
ing number of business men must be 
drawn from the universities. 

The largest steamer that has ever 
been launched was set afloat Oct. 20, 
at the shipyards of the White Star line 
In Belfast. The gigantic measure- 
ments of the ship are astonishing. 
Some idea of its enormous length may 




FATIMA 




TURKISH 

BLEND 

CIGARETTES 




With each package of 
l-alima v>u get a popu- 
lar actress' photograph 
— also a pennant cou- 
pon, 25 of which secure 
a hamhnme felt college 
pennant (12*32) — »*■ 
UclionvJ IUU. 



.•;.••, 



LITERATURE 



Fanciful phrases or 
thoughts couched in beauti- 
ful language may be well 
enough for the classics, but 
one homely word is suffi- 
cient to describe Fatima 
Cigarettes— They're 
"Bully"— and unlike 
Shakespeare, we repeat — 
they're "bully." 

Works of the old masters 
of tobacco blending — 
authors of all your joys — 
are Fatimas. Plainly 
packed — 10 additional 
cigarettes instead of a fancy 
box. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 






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be gained when it is said that it would 
over-top the Metropolitan Building in 
New York, and that it is four times as 
long as the Bunker Hill monument is 
high. The rudder of this boat alone 
weighs 100 tons. The "Olympic," 
for such Is its name, will carry in all 
2500 passengers and a crew of 860. 
It is provided with sun parlors, tennis 
courts, Turkish baths, swimming pools, 
elevators and all other conceivable 
conveniences. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. VV. Blaney, 'n, 

C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, K. L. Winn, 87 

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Team collects Mondays and Thursdays, 

Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays. 



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ROOMS WITH HEAT, 
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Haled shavings put up in 
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price: on application 












The College Signal, Tuesday, November i, 1910. 



FOR SALE! 
Military Uniform in Fine Condition 

Will fit a fairly large fellow. 
The price is far below trie cost of a new uniform. 

JOHN E. DUDLEY. JR. 

11 No. College 

WANTED 

BY THE 

Library of the Mass. Agr. College 



College Signal, March 22 and June 14, 
1910. 

Farm- Poultry, Feb. 1, 1908, 19:3. 

Farmers' Bulletins, 45, 70, 125, 321, 336, 
384. 

Mass. State Agr. Kxp. Station, Bulletins, 
1 — 14 inclusive. 

Wisconsin Agr. Kxp. Station, Bulletin, 
140. 

Any of the above items will be grate- 
fully received. 

Charlks K Grekn, Librarian. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Has started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 

FORESTRY, 



BOYDEN'S 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course »s open to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford a splendid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

Kenyon L. Butterkield, President. 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 



Herbert W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

Leon E. Fagerstrom, Jr., Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill, President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

John E. Dudley, Jr., President 



JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 



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consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



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BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
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TICKET SYSTEM 



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Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, %2. Weekly, %i> 



THF COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol.. XXI. 



i 



3? 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 8, 1910. 



No. 8 



-TjJ) SPRINGFIELD ON SATURDAY 



FOOTBALL 

Tufts Wins by 7-6 Score. Both Scores 

Made on Flukes. The Features 

were Tufts' Interference and 

Massachusetts' Holding. 

The first score of Saturday's game 
was decided rather by the official de- 
cision than by the players. In the 
third period with the score 6 to 5 in 
favor of Massachusetts. Gore while 
running backward caught a punt on the 
two yard line. Dunn tackled and 
through him behind the goal line. A 
safety was given to Tufts which 
decided the game for them. 

The new line-up in the back field work- 
ed well, and as usual Morse and Brewer 
were constant ground-gainers, Tufts 
was penalized eight times, once for 
offside and seven times either for hold- 
ing or pushing the man with the ball. 
These penalties amounted to 100- yards, 
while M. A. C. was not at all penal- 
ized. Tufts succeeded only once in 
making a forward pass, and though 
several attempts were made the quar- 
ter back was usually thrown for a loss 
before he could throw to an elligible 
receiver. Tufts showed exceptional 
Interference and made long gains on 
end runs. Massachusetts, when near 
the goal-line held Tufts for downs, for 
three times when on the 10, 5 and 3yd. 
lines Tufts failed to rush the ball over. 

FIRST QUARTER. 

Tufts kicked to Powers which was 
punted after the first play. Tufts failed 
to make their distance and punted ; 
the ball was immediately returned. 
Tufts made 8-yards in two plays but 
was penalized for holding. After twice 
making their distance, another 15-yard 
penalty, and an illegal forward pass, 
Tufts punted 30 yards. Merrill, Tufts, 
right tackle, recovered a fumble and 
ran 35 yards for a touchdown, but the 
goal was not kicked. 

Tufts then received the kick-off, 
which resulted in a touchback, and 
then kicked back. A forward pass 
gave 7 yards but the distance was not 
made. Tufts make the distance and 
then punted. Score. M. 0, T. 5. 

SECOND QUARTER. 

This quarter opened by Tufts twice 
making the distance and after a 15- 
yard penalty, punted. Massachusetts 
returned the punt, recovered it and 
again punted. The ball was worked 
down the field to our 3-yard line but 
could not be placed over. The ball 

[Continued on page 4] 



M. A. C vs. S. T. S. 



To Springfield on Saturday. Prospects and Com- 
parisons of Teams. 



Saturday draws near fast and with it 
the game with the Training School. 
This Is one of our most important 
games and for the past years 
has been the final game of our 
football season. Year after year our 
teams have gone down to Springfield 
and trimmed them when victory was 
prophesied for Training School. Until 
last year Springfield had not won a 
game since 1892. 

From the performance of the two 
teams it seems like a victory for 
Training school, for they have run up 
better scores against the same teams 
which we have played. They played a 
no score game with Amherst. A good 
comparison Is the Tufts game. They 
won from Tufts by a score of 5 to 
and from Worcester Tech. by a score 
of 6 to while we won from Worces- 
ter 14 to 5. In all games played 
Springfield has gained better results 
than we have. 

Our season has been a very poor 
one. One victory, two ties, four 
defeats would seem to be enough to 
permit our opponents to hope for any- 
thing, and with good reason to expect 
their hopes to be fulfilled. Saturday's 
showing was not pleasing to our sup- 
porters, but it should not be forgotten 
that in 1907 Springfield confidently 
expected and predicted victory, yet 
lost, and in 1908, under the same con- 
ditions, could only tie the score. In 
1909 Springfield certainly played a 
winning game from start to finish and 
It Is upon the result of that game that 
they are placing a large share of their 
hope. Since athletic relations with 
Training School were established In 
1890, we have been victorious eight 
times out of thirteen games, one being 
a tie. We have scored 124 points to 
our oppenents 101. In the last nine 
games they have scored twenty-seven 
points, four in 1906, five in 1908 and 
eighteen last year. 

Viewing this year's situation in an 
unprejudiced light, it is hard to see 
how we can predict victory. But 
under the stimulus of a vigorous appli- 
cation of that Massachusetts spirit 
shown by our entire student body in 
Springfield last year we can carry 
Springfield off its feet, and Aggie on 
to victory. 



Besides this game in the afternoon, 
a soccer team composed mostly of 
upperclassmen will play Springfield In 
the morning. 

As a preliminary to the afternoon 
game Chicopee High School will line 
up against Holyoke High. 

The student body will go to Spring- 
field Saturday morning from Amherst 
by a special train. In the evening 
many intend to attend "The Merry 
Widow" at the Court Square Theatre. 
The band will carry their instruments 
and play to aid the singing of the stu- 
dent body. 

Beg. Borrow, or Steal, but be in 
Springfield Saturday to see our 
team play those huskies off their feet. 
We have a team that is light but fast 
and determined; having a variety 
of plays so great that a whole half 
might be played without mai-.tng the 
same play twice and they are capable 
of winning this game. Springfield 
has never won but one game 
from us since 1892, a period of 
eighteen years. Even when the odds 
were against us, much more than they 
are this year, we have gone down and 
won. Let's do it again. 

Our team has its limitations and is 
practically the same team that lost to 
Springfield last year but that counts 
for nothing. The rules as planned this 
year should aid us much more than 
they do Springfield. The coaches 
have been working hard, and now we 
have a team that can be depended up- 
on to lose not a single yard by penalty. 
In the last game not a penalty was im- 
posed on our team for holding while 
Tufts lost over 100 yards for this of- 
fence. In the hard, close game that this 
one promises to be, we will have a 
great advantage in our favor on this 
account alone. 

Another coach is expected this week 
to work with the linemen, and with the 
men all in good condition, there is no 
reason why the team should not play 
its best on Saturday. Springfield has 
had a good season so far and is con- 
fident, Massachusetts always plays her 
best game against them so a great 
game is expected. Some recent shifts 
In our line-up have placed the men to 



SUNDAY MORNING TALK 



Rev. F. E. Tower of the New York Law 

and Order League Addresses 

Sunday Chapel. 

Rev. Francis E. Tower, superin- 
tendent of the Law and Order League 
In New York, addressed the students 
at Sunday chapel exercises. Four 
years ago, in conjunction with friends, 
he established a Law and Order 
League in New York, to uphold and 
enforce the law. People had begun 
to despair of the enforcement of the 
law, because of its repeated violation 
by the liquor-dealers and other similar 
dealers. They declared that It was 
Impossible to break their hold upon the 
office-holders in the country. Scores 
of people believe that lawlessness is so 
prevalent in this country, that our form 
of government is not strong enough. 
They predict that it will change to 
some other form such as monarchy. 
If lawlessness continues, there is no 
doubt of the decline of the present 
form of government, for government Is 
not simply 'hs writing of statutes, the 
laws of a republic must be enforced. 
The boldness of the liquor dealers 
was shown in the fact that they boasted 
of continued liquor traffic with or with- 
out license. They bought up the dis- 
trict attorney, the jurors and any 
opposing faction and so controlled the 
courts that it was almost impossible to 
secure the conviction of the most ser- 
ious cases relating to liquor. The 
various towns took up the fight against 
them individually, but failed when pre- 
senting cases In court, and conse- 
quently became discouraged. 

Mr. Tower had studied the problem 
and understood the situation because 
of wide experiences in the counties of 
New York State and he believed that 
the only way to fight the liquor ques- 
tion was to work through the county as 
a unit. The court and Its officers 
were elected and controlled by the 
county, and any corruption in this line 
must be met by the citizens or voters 
in the county. 

By adopting this method one hun- 
dred and seventy-seven indictments 
were made against corrupt men, and 
these indictments led to ninety-three 
convictions, aggregating nine thousand 
five hundred dollars in fines. The 
success of this method became more 
and more apparent, the corrupt ring of 
political men In sixteen counties was 



[Continued on paco *■) 



(Continued on pat* *\ 












MASS MEETINGS: TONIGHT AT 6-30, WEDNESDAY AT 4-30, FRIDAY AT 6-30 P. M. IN CHAPEL 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 8, 19 10. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, EdItor-ln-Chlef. 

HAROLD F. WILLARD. 19U. Managing; Editor. 
IRVING W. DAVIS. 1911. Alumni Note*. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY, 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYALN.HALLOWELL.19I2, Assistant Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912. CoUego Notoi. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Department Notes. 

ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. Issue Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALLEN. 1911, Business Manager. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1 9 1 2.Asst. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN. Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered as second-class 
Pwt OHIO*. 



matter at the Amherst 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, NOV. 8. No. 8 



The willing massing of the students 
at the old fort Wednesday for cheering 
and singing showed the spirit of the 
college to be at Its best. At its best 
it is an inspiration, not alone to the 
men on the football field, but to the 
students themselves. Yet this same 
spirit Is a bit erratic; for men con- 
stantly walk out of chapel on Friday 
with no excuse whatever for missing 
the song practice; now and then a 
man is seen on the step of South, 
another kicking a football about the 
athletic field when both ought to be at 
the side-lines cheering. When the 
M. A. C. spirit becomes consistent it 
will be ideal. 



Has the student body at M. A. C. 
an Interest in any kind of politics — 
municipal, state or federal? Has it 
ever had an interest ; is it ever to 
have? The college man Is the most 
trustworthy and efficient voter and 
office-holder. Intellectually and mor- 
ally his type has no peer. He enters 
college too young to vote but, before 
graduating, is usually old enough. 
When the law sees fit to call him a 
man he ought to take pride in being 
able to accept his privilege under- 
standingly. 



With the going of the flies the last 
of the netting has been ripped out of 
the windows of North and South and 
discarded. Its usefulness is done and 
there will be no more of it till another 
summer and another summer school. 
Then the feminine summer-school 
mind will, once more, demand netting, 
even in advance of food and shelter 
and a couch to rest on. Male stu- 
dents are apt to make a jest of fly 
netting; yet the netting has its place 
and purpose. It serves to remind that 
the college is in operation, not nine 
but twelve months In the year, and 
that the season of undergraduate activ- 
ity is followed by still another lasting 
till the close of August and directed 



by Prof. Hurd and the Department of 
Short Courses. 



"Down to Springfield town 

The Aggie team is coming down." 

This is the annual cry and on Satur- 
day not only the team is going down 
but everybody is going down. The 
question is not how many are going 
but what few there are who will stay! 
The spirit moves, pervades everything, 
and gathers up everybody. The prep- 
arations clearly show that the nature 
of the contest calls for big things, that 
the results mean much. One result 
is and is being accomplished, for the 
growing spirit proves it. An enthusi- 
astic student body, carrying its war cry 
into the enemies' country, must aid 
its representatives, must give the feel- 
ing of support and courage. Even 
though the prospect is not as bright as 
might be desired, yet in 1907 the 
team faced a Training School team 
that had been defeated by Harvard 
only, but when our boys returned to 
Amherst the score was on our side. 
Let's do it again. The team only 
needs to be put against something 
hard to show its worth, as it did Sat- 
urday by holding Tufts for downs three 
times when within our 10-yard line. 
The fight with Training School will 
afford an excellent and worthy oppor- 
tunity to display ability, and the stu- 
dents expect the team to exhibit good 
football for they know the team can — 
but. The team has just as much 
right to demand a proper backing from 
the fellows. They demand confidence 
and they are to receive it ; so plan for 
the special train, don't miss a single 
mass meeting, and while seeing the 
best game of the season sing and 
cheer as never before. E. M. B. 



UP- TO- DATE 



FOOTWEAR 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in the 
Signal Office or handed to E. M. Brown 1 1 . on or 
before the Saturday preceding each Issue.] 

Nov. 8 — 6-45 p. m. Stockbridge 
club. 

7-00 p. m. Glee club rehearsal, 
chapel. 

Nov. 9 — 3-00 p. m. Assembly, Pro- 
fessor Waugh, stereopjicon 
lecture. 

7-00 p. m. Debating club in 
Public Speaking room. 

Nov. 10—6-45 p. m. Y. M. C. A 
chapel. 

7-30 p. m. Dramatic club 
chapel. 

Nov. 1 1 — 4-45 p.m. Glee club, chapel. 

Nov. 12 — Football, Springfield Train- 
ing school at Springfield, Soc- 
cer football in the morning and 
rugby in the afternoon. 

Nov. 13—9-00 a. m. Sunday talk, 
chapel, Hon. Frank A. Hos- 
mer, Amherst. 



The speaker for Sunday morning, 
Nov. 13, will be the Hon. Frank A. 
Hosmer of Amherst. His subject will 
be "Courtesy," particularly as applied 
to college men. 



PUMPS 



ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 



TENNIS SHOES 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 8, 1910. 



E. E MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



KODAKS 



THURBER'S 

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COTRELL and LEONARD 



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Makers 
of 



EASTMAN'S FILMS 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 

SUPPLIES 



CAP & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the 'At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



The Prospect House 



Good Board and 
Clean, Airy Rooms 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 



Drug Store 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



COLLEGE NOTES 

An ice-wagon spent Fpiday night in 
the mud on the road near the dining- 
hall. 

It evidently takes more than the 
driving rain of last Friday to discour- 
age cross-country men. 

At the meeting of the Junior Prom 
Committee Wednesday A. C. Brett 
was elected chairman and Silas Wil- 
liams secretary and treasurer. 

The Y. M. C. A. meeting of Nov. 
10th will be led by Rev. J. M. Lent 
of the Amherst Baptist Church. 
Special music will be provided. 

A,t a recent class meeting, the 
Freshmen elected Stanley B. Free- 
born as football manager and a com- 
mittee was appointed to obtain samples 
of class hats. 

The Assembly speaker for Wednes- 
day, the 9th, will be Prof. F. A. 
Waugh. His talkVill be on his Euro- 
pean trip last spring, and particularly 
his trip through Germany. 

The department of Landscape Gar- 
dening has been compelled to provide 
several new drawing tables and new 
sets of instruments to meet the in- 
creased registration. These materials 
have been arriving the past few days 
and will help out materially on the 
work. 

Several of the Juniors taking Land- 
scape 1 have started an evening lec- 
ture club, lectures to be given weekly 
on Thursday night. Professor Waugh 
has agreed to lecture when it is pos- 
sible and from themes and articles 
read at these meetings the club should 
put forth a very Interesting as well as 
entertaining evening. 

During the past week Professor 
Waugh has had an unusually fine col- 
lection of post cards on exhibition in 
Wilder Hall. These were collected 
by him on his recent trip abroad, and 
they are considerably more attractive 
from the artistic standpoint than the 
souvenir post-cards commonly seen in 
this country. The class in Landscape 
Gardening 5 used them in one of the 
regular class exercises. 

The Debating Club met on Nov. 
2nd, President Barrows in the chair. 
The question, Resolved : That immi 
gration from Europe should be further 
restricted, was debated by Patch and 
Barrows for the affirmative, Roberts 
and White for the negative. The 
judges decided in favor of the affirm- 
ative. A short business meeting was 
then held. The Club will meet again 
on Wednesday evening. The question 
for debate is Resolved : That in labor 
disputes the boycott is a justifiable 
policy. The affirmative side will con- 
sist of Hammond and Warner, the 
negatives Hemenway and French. 

At the mass meeting last Wednes- 



the vacation remain as it is at present. 
Also the matter of students' shooting 
squirrels on the Horticultural depart- 
ment grounds was spoken of by H. W. 
Blaney, president of the Senate. 
Following this Cheer Leader Nicker- 
son and Singing Leader Prcuty took 
charge of the meeting during which 
time some of the newer songs were 
tried and several cheers were 
given. The possibility of having a 
special train from Amherst to Spring- 
field for the Springfield game was also 
taken up and at present there Is every 
possible chance of there being one to 
leave Amherst at 12 o'clock Saturday 
morning. 



DRAMATIC NOTES 

Rehearsals of the "Private Secre- 
tary" are progressing favorably and it 
is hoped that the play will be ready for 
production by Thanksgiving. 

R. C. Robinson ' 1 1 makes an ideal 
landlady with his petit mannerisms, 
demure expressions and general good 
nature. 

F. B. Hills '12 makes a most real- 
istic old maid. His strong point 
seems to be a fondness for spirits, not 
of the material earth but that form of 
spirits inhabiting the celestial world. 

H. A. Goodnough '13 is a sly little 
girl who proves in no small degree her 
ability to flirt. 

A. H. Sharpe '11 is the ideal type 
of the modern society young man, who 
seems to be "up in the air" for the 
most part of the time but who shows 
that he can "come back to earth" 
when the question of love is Involved, 

S. M. Jordan '13. Here we have 
the true type of apologetic clergyman. 
His "goods and chattels" are a con- 
stant trial to all concerned and his 
everlasting "D'you know" becomes 
practically a by-word. 



CHANGE IN RUSHING SEASON 

At the recent meeting of the frater- 
nity conference the rushing season was 
changed because of noon chapel. As 
it is imperative to have members 
pledged during an exercise in which 
all students are gathered, chapel will 
be held on Monday and Thursday 
mornings of the rushing week from 
7-45 until 8 o'clock. The season will 
begin the second Monday after Thanks- 
giving, Dec. 5th, at chapel and end 
Wednesday night at 6 p. m. and mem- 
bers will pledge themselves during 
Thursday morning chapel, Dec. 8th. 
E. M. Brown, Sec. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
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I 



Sanderson 
& Thompson, 



Clothiers, 

Hatters, 

Tailors. 



C&rp{rvter & Morehoust, 

PRINTERS, 



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Amherst, Mass. 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



OF 




in t Cioatei! 



TOBACCO 



A T 



The Cornell Masque, the dramatic 
club of the university, has planned a 
Christmas trip with an itinerary of eight 
performances upon which presenta- 
tions of "The Butterflies" will be given 




day afternoon the matter of having a in many of the cities of the East, 

ten days' vacation instead of two including Brooklyn, Philadelphia and 

weeks Christmas, and lengthening the Washington. If the trip is permitted 

summer vacation one week was taken by the faculty it will be the longest 

up. The student body voted to have ever taken by the organization. 



The College Drug Store 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 

Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

Ward's ""ZSSSr*- 



ALL OF THE 



VARSITY MEN 

and most of the upserclassmen 
wear 

DUDIvEY 

HAND KNIT 

Shaker Sweaters 

"THERE IS A REASON." 



EDWARD L. HAZEN, 14 



AGENT FOR 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



AT M. A. C. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 8, 1910. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 8, 19 10. 




In some of our special suits for young 
men we have adapted, not adopted, the 
new London fashion— the coat closer to 
the figure than formerly, smaller sleeves, 
natural shoulders, practically no padding, 
the effect entirely new. 

Men who want totally new ideas in 
dress will find this store the "center rush." 



COLMEY BROS. 

Westfield, - - • Mass. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



H. W. FIELD 

... FfcORIS? ... 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



OPP. ACADEMY OF MUSIC, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

ruqs 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



THE LAW AND ORDER LEAGUE 

[Continued from first p»g«] 

shattered, and Instead of ousting the 
district attorney for his co-operation 
the voters of the county had him 
reelected. 

The method of carrying on this work 
is under the auspices of the Law and 
Order League. This organization 
sends out speakers to every church In 
every town in the county, secures at 
these meetings the signatures of voters 
who desire to co-operate in enforcing 
the law, then hold a county convention 
to established the league in that 
county. When this has been done, 
the attorney is presented with a list of 
meetings held, the officers selected in 
the league, and the voters determined 
to enforce the law. It has a wonderful 
effect on the attorney and he Invaria- 
bly gives his support to the movement, 
A court trial is then held which 
approaches fairness to both parties and 
the deserved conviction is more often 
secured. The momentum produced 
by such a movement becomes enor- 
mous, and in one county election eight 
towns were added to the list as "dry 
towns. ' ' 

Our system of education throughout 
the county does not include instruction 
concerning the duties of a citizen 
toward our free government. This 
instruction should be inculcated In our 
system. The young people should be 
taught the sacredness of the oath, the 
blackness of corruption, and the desir- 
ability of honest politics. The assim- 
ilation of foreign people who rapidly 
become voters presents a big problem, 
and the salvation of our free govern- 
ment lies In its trained young people 
from educational institutions. 




D. OILMAN. 

TELEPHONE 



C. A. MOFFET. 
1079-3. 



GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 
IN 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Maim Street. 

Worcester, Mass. 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



Clapp, '12. 



Beers, '12. 



S. T. S. GAME. 

[Continued from first pace. 



the best advantage, so be on hand to 
see them fight. You have done it be- 
fore. Let's do it again. 

A special train is being arranged, 
about which more will be heard later, 
so be on the watch, come out strong 
for the mass meetings this week, talk 
it over, whoop it up. You have stood 
behind the team well, every time, so 
for, Let's do it again. 



We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



FOOTBALL. 

(Continued from pate I ) 



was punted out and after two plays, 
the second placement kick was tried 
which tailed. Several plays and an 
exchange of punts ended the quarter. 
Score. M. 0, T. 5. 

THIRD QUARTER. 

Powers received the kickoff. Tufts 
was penalized for offside on the first 
play, but secured the ball on a fumble. 
A run of 20 yards, 1 yard, no gain, 12 
yards and 3 yards brought the ball 
within striking distance of the goal but 
a 15 yard penalty threw them back. 
A placement kick was attempted but 
then Larsen recovered the blocked ball 
and ran 85 yards for a touchdown. 



jtB. N. PARISEAU,.* 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



RAZORS HONED 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



Morse kicked the goal. Brewer ran Invite school or college girls to attend 
back the kickoff 15 yards and then the Prom. It would be impossible for 



punted. Tufts made first down twice 
but was then held and the ball was 
punted back to them. Again they 
made their distance twice, but the 
third time they failed to make their 
distance. An. exchange of punts 
secured the safety for Tufts. Score 
M. 6,T. 7. 

FOURTH QUARTER. 

Bittinger and O'Brien went in at 
the beginning of this period. This 
period was an exchange of punts 
mostly. Tufts made their distance 
twice, received penalties amounting to 
30 yards and attempted several unsuc- 
cessful forward passes. During the 
latter part of this period Hayden was 
seriously injured. Score M. 6, T. 7. 

Many alumni and ex-men were 
present to witness the game. 

The summary : 

TUFTS. M. A. C. 

Dunn, le re. Larsen 

Costanza, It rt, Powers 

Russell. Tattan, lg rg. Walker. Hubert 

Winship, c c. Johnson 

Mountford, rg lg, Hubert, Hayden, McGarr 



Merrill, rt 
Richert, re 
Bohlin. qb 
Weber, lhb 



It. Samson 

le. Lane. O'Brien 

qb, Gore 

rhb, Morse 



Dittrick, Stevens. Nason. rhb 

lhb, Moreau. Coodnough 
Nason. Kerver, Houston, fb 

fb, Brewer, Smith, Bittinger 

Score— Tufts 7. M. A. C. 6. Touch- 
downs — Larsen, Merrill. Goal from touch- 
down — Morse. Safety— Gore Umpire — 
Brown of the B. A. A. Referee -Bankart 
of Dartmouth. Field Judge — Bragg of Wes- 
leyan. Linesman- Jones of Tufts Time 
— 15 min. quarters. 



them to "cut" an entire week to 
accept a Prom. invitation. As it is now, 
considerable difficulty is encountered 
in getting the Mt. Holyoke girls to be 
excused even for a single Saturday. 

With regard tn May being the most 
beautiful season of the year, 1 wish to 
state that June is just as beautiful and 
the weather at that time much more 
moderate than in May. Also what 
could be moje picturesque than our 
snow-covered campus in February? 

Lastly, commencement is ci.e of 
the greatest events of a man's life. 
Should not the class most nearly 
related to the graduating class show 
their appreciation to that class by giv- 
them a reception and dance as a grand 
finale to their social life in college? 
It seems so to me. 

Therefore, keep the two- Prom sys- 
tem as it is. Look into it, both from 
the financial standpoint and from the 
standpoint of the sentiment expressed. 
Then consider whether it is not more 
advisable to have the Junior Prom, in 
February and the Sophomore-Senior 
Prom, in June, rather than have the 
proposed "Junior Week" in May. 
Very truly yours, 

Georce Zabriskie 2d, '13. 
Nov. 4, 1910. 



COMMUNICATION 

(Communications to the Signal concerning mat- 
ters of eeneral Interest are welcomed. The Signal 
Is not to be held responsible for the opinions thus 
expressed.) 

To the Editor, College Sicnal: 
Dear Sir: 

Personally I think that a "Jun- 
ior Week" in May, thus eliminating 
the Sophomore-Senior Prom in June, 
will have a decided disadvantage over 
the present system. In the first place, 
unless a fellow is obliged to pay a girl's 
railroad fare from a great distance, it 
will be cheaper for him to have her 
visit the college twice for compara- 
tively short periods, than to have her 
spend an entire week at one visit. In 
other words it is much more conven- 
ient for a man to pay twenty or twenty- 
five dollars twice a year, than it is for 
him to pay out forty or fifty dollars in 
a lump sum. The college is so large 
now, that the wives of the instructors 
cannot begin to accommodate all the 
fellows by keeping their girls. Besides 
it would be an imposition to ask any 
woman to house a girl for a week. 
Thus a "Junior Week" would neces- 
sitate keeping the young ladies at a 
hotel. This would require a chaperone 
and would result in a much greater 
outlay of money than does the system 
in vogue at present 

Then again many of the fellows 



LABORATORY FERTILIZERS 

There arc forms of nitrogen in the market which if* BHM* 

or less inert, Including many so-called tankages or bloods, which 
are dried and ground, either separately <>■ mixed with good tank- 
ige or dried blood, and told tO dry mixers or home mixer* as 
tankages, much as a little cream used to be mixed with oleo- 
margarine to give it the aroma and taste of butter. These, if 

only " dry mixed," white giving goods that may show up well 

in the laboratory, do not show up well in the field, for they have 
not been pro|>erly cooked, as it were ; and ifter all. it is 1 lit- field 

test which tells the story. The practical farmer who it growing 

quick crops for quick returns wants goods that will act during 
the current season. He considers the following season when he 
gets to it. 

" For the /.,i/h/'s S*k*" Study the /'/ant Rod I'tohlon. 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



I. M. LABROVITZ 



THE 



AGRICULTURE IN HAWAII 

President Butterfikld : 

Dear Sir: 

\ am thoroughly familiar with 
the efficient and reputable work of the 
Board of Immigration of the Territory 
of Hawaii, that a majority of the com- 
missioners are well known to me, and 
I fully endorse the enclosed letter of 
Oct. 4. 

Frank A. Hosmer. 

Honolulu, Hawaii, Oct. 4, 1910. 
President Kenyon L. Buiterfield : 

Dear President ; 

I want, through you if possible, 
to get into communication with a few 
young men practically as well as theo- 
retically familiar with farming and farm 
methods, who have a little capital, and 
who can interest other farmers to 
Hawaii, taking up land under the pro- 
visions made at the last session of 
Congress. 

We want to place colonies of fruit 
and vegetable and possibly dairy farm- 
ers on fertile government lands, at an 
altitude and in a location where the 
climate is temperate, and yet where 
pineapples and other tropical fruits can 
be grown ; and in country accessible 
to markets. 

Lands here are intrinsically exceed- 
ingly valuable. I know of lowlands 
renting for $50 per acre per year. 
These government lands will be sold, 
they cannot be given away by the gov- 
ernment, at a price to make them very 
profitable, but only under settlement 
condition. Those I have immediately 
in mind are in a white neighborhood, 
with church and school facilities equal 



Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits and Overcoats To Order 
Always a large and select line of Foreign and Domestic Woolens. 

Dyeing, Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing aSpecialty 

A guaranteed fit in all the latest kinds of garments. 

Renovated Suits For Sale. 

A first class line of Cent's Furnishing Goodl always on band. E. k W. 

Collars and Dress Shirts. Satisfaction guaranteed in every transai tion 



1 1 Amity Street, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Tel. 302-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS P/A/S 



1 






Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

(lass Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and ("lass 

Stationery 









Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 

WORKS, 17th STREET <& LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 8, 1910. 



•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.■.•.•.•.•.-.•.•.............................. 

GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 




AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



■^••^^^^^^^^^^'tW:66(V^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ , ^%Vi( 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



rhoenix Row 



S I EAM PITTING, Telephone 59—4. 

GAS FITTING, TINNING 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

Specialty of Repairing— 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 

FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, • Mass. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



J. H. TROTT 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



E B. DICKINSON D. D S 

r>is;v*rAF^ ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

OfflCI Hcm'rs: 
DtolUA.M, l.HOtoni>.M. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



Olvmpia Candv Co. 



257 Main St., 
Northampton, 



Mass. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



to those of any eastern rural neighbor- 
hood. They are not in any way con- 
connected with cane plantations. A 
farmer needs $3000 or $4000 to make 
a good start here. 

Very truly yours, 
I. S. Clark, 

Executive Officer, B, 1. 



FOOTBALL SCORES SATURDAY 

Harvard 27, Cornell 5. 
Brown 21, Yale 0, 
Dartmouth 15, Amherst 3. 
Princeton 17, Holy Cross 0. 
Army 5, Springfield 0. 
Pennsylvania 18, Lafayette 0. 
Carlisle 22, Virginia 6. 
Syracuse 3, Vermont 0. 
Bowdoin 6, Bates 6. 
Maine 6, Colby 0. 
Princeton '14 6, Yale '14 0. 
R. I. State 19, Worcester P. I. 0. 
Williams 0, Wesleyan 0. 
Andover 21, Exeter 0. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

AGRICULTURE. 

The Certified Milk Plant was 
recently Inspected by a Boston in- 
spector, who used the United States 
government score card, and marked 
the plant 100. The score card allows 
forty points of equipment and sixty 
points for methods. 

The following team will represent 
the college at a corn judging contest to 
be held at the New England Corn 
Exposition at Worcester on Nov. 9th : 

A. T. Conant '11, N. H. Hill 'II, 
P. W. Pickard '11 and E. N. Davis 
'11 alternate. 

entomology. 
Classes in entomology were started 
in the new building on Oct. 31. 
There was much to be done in the line 
of moving and putting the final touches 
to the equipment in the laboratory and 
lecture rooms before the classes could 
be held there. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

BARBER 
SH0P-»o 



The SHOP THAT LEADS 



ALSO 



AGGIE SHOP 

NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



MASSACHUSETTS AGGIES 
ATTENTION ! ! 

The twenty-fifth annual reunion and 
banquet of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College club of New York will 
be held at the Hotel St. Denis, Broad- 
way and 1 1th Street, Friday evening, 
Dec. 2d, under the presidency of Alvan 
Luther Fowler '80, former Captain, 
Adjutant and Assistant Instructor In 
Military Science and Tactics. Mass. 
Agric. Corps Cadets. At 7-15 p. m., 
Captain Fowler will order the attack 
on the Banquet Hall. 

Among the speakers will be the 
President of the College, Kenyon L. 
Butterfield, LL.D., ex-Secretary of 
the Treasury, George B. Cortelyou, 
LL. D. and the President of the Bal- 
timore & Ohio Railroad Company, 
Daniel Willard '82. 

The attendance at recent dinners 
has increased yearly over 60 pet cent ; 
we wish to obtain a working knowledge 
of those to come and thus desire 
returns, even if tentative, ere Oct. 



Wright 
&Ditson 

Football and Ba;>ketball suits 
the standard at all leading 
colleges. The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
Guards the best and most pract- 
ical, also Skates and Hockey 
Goods. The Wright & Dit- 
4L son Sweaters have 
^U^y) long been recognized 

•>]|L» ** inc best- 

^> College Students and Athletes 
&*~ who want the real, superior 
>w^ articles for the different sports 
•». •• mt, or, should get the kind that bear 
our trade-mark. Catalogue Jree. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

22 Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

76 Weybosset Street, Providence, R. I. 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



pi. J. Lapoiie, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



HU TO— LIVERY— HOBSE 

Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 

Tel. 183. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 8, 1910. 






FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of trie floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only Jrotn 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



FRANK S. O'BRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND MACK 



15th, to insure the right -sized hall ; 
we also earnestly desire to hear from 
all ; many last year sent messages ; 
these were grouped In envelopes by 
classes, to the great edification of 
those present, who thereby heard from 
men they may not have seen in 
decades, and who only wished that all 
living of the friends made on the old 
Aggie Campus had reported. It is 
hardly necessary to add that this, our 
twenty-fifth annual reunion, will be the 
greatest and best ever. Dinner tick- 
ets, $4. 

By order of the executive committee : 

John A. Cutter, M. D., '82, Sec. 

262 West 77th St., New York. 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 



8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, - - MASS. 

Telephone 



ALUMNI NOTES 
S. T. S. vs. M. A. C. at Spring- 
field, Saturday, Nov. 12, 1010. 

•04.— R. R. Raymoth is in the 
photographic supply business in 
Tacoma. Wash., and is also making a 
considerable stir on the Pacific coast 
as a tenor singer. 

'04. — Dr. E. A. Bach is at present 
taking a trip through Mexico, in the 
service of the Bureau of Entomology, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, in 
search of insect parasites. He has 
already been to Cuba on this mission, 
to the peninsula of Yucatan and is now 
in Mexico City. 

'09. — The November number of 
The Craftsman has an Important illus- 
trated article on landscape gardening 
by Harold D. Phelps. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

The Amherst dramatic association 
is to give "Romeo and Juliet" this 
year. 

Several members of the Aero Club 
of Cornell University are building an 
aeroplane at Ithaca. 

The celebration of the twenty-fifth 
anniversary of the opening of Bryn 
Mawr College was held Oct. 21st 
and 22nd. 

A rule at Amherst preventing fresh- 
men from playing on varsity teams 
until after their mid-year examinations 
goes into effect this fail. 

The Dartmouth, the newspaper of 
the college, has appeared in a new 
form this year. A four page sheet 
printed three mornings every week 
takes the place of the larger magazine 
formerly published twice a week. 

Arrangements for the construction 
of a rifle range on the Columbia cam- 
pus have been almost completed. It 
will be situated in the tunnel running 
parallel to the new Philosophy building 
and will be about two hundred feet in 
length. 

Two prizes have been awarded for 
two designs, out of a hundred and fifty 
which were submitted for a new seal 
for Cornell University. The commit- 
tee is still unsatisfied, however, and 
the search for a more suitable design 
will be continued. 

Some radical changes have been 



% 



FATIMA 




. 



•V 



Wi'.h tech package of 
Fatima i mi gel a popu- 
lar a Iti-m ' photograph 
— c-.' u a pennant cou- 
pon, 25 cj which Mrcure 
a liunJseme /. !l college 
pennant (1 2x 32) — «e- 
Itction of I UO. 



TURKISH 

J BLEND 

CIGARETTES 

**\ PHYSICS 

What beautiful precision 
— what certainty of action 
and result governs every 
movement in Physics. 

Really we know of no 
suitable comparison except 
in Fatima Cigarettes — 
where our infinite knowl- 
edge of tobacco blending 
malces certain your enjoy- 
ment of all the rare qualities 
possible in a cigarette. 

They act like a lever in ele- 
vating your taste. And if you're 
inclined to plain packages you'll 
rise to the occasion Get 20 for 
I 5 cents. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 



'•"■'-: 
'■':'-■ 



• 'T' . ' ,- ' ■ ' .■ i : ' -y. 9 . ' .-'. ' . ■ ■ ' ■ ' "' '':■■;-".':; '. /.:: , "-'.''.'.'-. , v.'.' , v'.*.*"'-// i '.v7-. 



I 



. —J 




THE H. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



SIAMIOKI), CONN. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. W. I5lan*y, 'n, 

C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, K. L. Winn, 87 

Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursdays, 

Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays. 



BASSALOTTI & GENTASO 

FRUIT, 

CONFECTIONERY, 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

BRICKS TO TAKE HOME. 

CORNER AMITY & PLEASANT STREETS 



Great River Water Power Go. 

/■:. A. &■ .V. //. ALLEN, Preps. 
Office, CJillet l Block. 

WESTFIED, MASS. 









ROOMS WITH HEAT, 
POWER A LIGHT 



F* O 



RENT 



BALED SHAVINGS 

put up in attractive shape, 
in car lots. 



PRICE ON APPLICATION 



__ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 8, 1910. 



made in the Cornell University calen- 
dar for the forthcoming year. The 
Easter vacation has been cut from 
twelve to five days, and Decoration 
Day and Washington's Birthday do 
not appear as holidays. 

There has been presented to Cornell 
university by the Japanese government 
a hand-decorated silk scroll upon which 
is inscribed a copy of the official appre- 
ciation for the entertainment of the 
Honorary Commercial Commissioners 
of Japan who visited Cornell last fall. 

President Hadley of Yale university 
sailed Sept. 24th for Europe to study 
the effects of American legislation on 
the disposition of American securities 
in the markets of Europe. He will 
also represent Yale university at 
the centennial celebration of Berlin 
university. 

West Point is in a state of open 
rebellion on account of the "silence" 
given Captain Rufus E. Longan. The 
Cadet Corps is an absolute unit and 
the situation is delicate. The military 
board of inquiry has not been able to 
obtain any information about the insult 
from the cadets. 



WANTED 

— BY THE 

Library of the Mass. Agr. College 



College Signal, March 22 and June 14, 
1910. 

Farm-1'oultry, Feb. 1, 1908, 19:3. 

Farmers' Bulletins, 45, 70, 125, 321, 336, 
384. 

Mass. State Agr. Exp. Station, Bulletins, 
1 — 14 inclusive. 

Wisconsin Agr. Exp. Station, Bulletin, 
140. 

Any of the above items will be grate- 
fully received. 

Charlks K. Green, Librarian. 



BOYDEN'S 



Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

196*200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Has started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 

FORESTRY, 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course .s open to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford a splendid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

Kknyon L. Butterfield, President. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 



■• 



Boot & Shoes Repaired 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

N neteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society, 

Debating Council, 



Herbert W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

Leon E. Fagerstrom, Jr., Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill, President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

John E. Dudley, Jr., President 

Raymond C. Barrows, President 

Irving C. Gilgore, President 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON &> CUTLEX 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424- 1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



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Amherst, 



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Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, $2. Weekly, $1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol 



;i. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 15, 1910. 



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No. 9 




SPRINGFIELD GAME 



Springfield Defeats M. A. C. by a Score 
of 15-3. 

Saturday afternoon the annual foot- 
ball match between the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College and the Spring- 
field Training School took place at the 
new Training School field. From the 
opening kick-off until the final whistle 
it could be seen that Springfield out- 
played us, though they had to fight 
hard for every yard. They outweighed 
our team by fifteen pounds to the man. 
and at the same time equalled the M . 
A. C. team in speed. 

Herbert L. Pratt, the donor of the 
new field, opened the game by kicking 



off from the side lines to Capt. Dela- 
hanty. The latter received the ball 
and put it in place for the regular kick- 
off. 

FIRST QUARTER. 

Morse kicked off to Kelly, who ran 
the ball twenty-five yards where he 
was downed by Moreau, Then fol- 
lowed a line play which resulted in a 
small gain for Springfield. A punt by 
Metzler forced the M. A. C. team 
down to its twenty-five yard line. For 
a while we held bravely against Spring- 
field, forcing them back to their fifty- 
five yard line. We could not hold 
them long, however, and when again 
on our twenty-five yard line, on a fum- 
ble, Briggs of Springfield broke through 
the Aggie defence aud scored the first 



touchdown. Home missed an easy 
goal. The ball was received by Swen- 
son on the kick-off, who ran back the 
ball fifteen yards. After that Spring- 
field could not make the required gains 
and was forced to punt. Our team 
made a gain of four yards and then 
Brewer punted. In the next play Gore 
captured a forward pass and carried 
the ball to our thirty-five yard line. 
The quarter ended with the ball on our 
fifteen yard line. 

SECOND QUARTER. 

At the first part of this period we 
drove through Springfield's line for 
good gains. An intercepted pass by 
Walker gave Brewer a chance for one 
of his long pur.ts. Home of Springfield 



DEDICATION OF BUILDING 

The Dedicatory Exercises of the New 
Building for Entomology and Zool- 
ogy were Held in Its Amphithe- 
ater on Friday Afternoon. 

The dedicatory exercises of the 
building for Entomology and Zoology 
were held in the amphitheatre at 2 p.m. 
Friday, November 11th. President 
Butterfield made a few Introductory 
remarks, stating that the plans for this 
building were made two years ago by 
Architect Clarence T. White of Bos- 
ton, in conjunction with Dr. H. T. 
Fernald. The original appropriation 
for this building amounted to eighty 
thousand dollars, but fifteen thousand 
dollars were added during the last year 
for equipment, giving this institution 
the best equipped structure for ento- 
mology in the world. 

The president introduced Dr. Fred- 
erick Tuckerman. 78. who delivered 
a paper on the life of Henry James 
Clark as teacher and investigator. 
Mr. Clark was graduated from New 
York University in 1847, and became 
an Instructor in botany and zoology. 
Later he went to Cambridge and be- 
came the private assistant of Professor 
Agas:»iz. Soon after he became as- 
sistant professor of zoology at the Har- 
vard Scientific School. In 1872 he 
came to M. A. C. and started the 
Zoological Museum here. Never of 
robust constitution, hard work still 
further undermined his health, and he 
died in 1873. Although his period of 
service at this institution was brief, he 
laid a splendid foundation on which to 
develop this department, and he is said 
to have been one of the most eminent 
biologists this country ever produced. 
Dr. W. E. Hinds, '99. of Auburn, 
Ala. , gave a comprehensive sketch on 
"Zoology and Entomology at the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College." He 
said in part : "It is not easy to review 
the work of the last torty years. Car- 
lisle's stud) of Frederick the Great led 
him into a study of all Europe. So In 
presenting this subject one most con- 
sider professors, students, equipment 
and other details. 

The Morrill Act of 1862 was a sig- 
nificant, progressive step in education. 
It started agricultural colleges in every 
state and gave opportunity for the de- 
velopment of the natural sciences. 

The natural history collection was 
started at M. A. C. in 1858. It then 
contained two-thirds of the species of 
birds in this locality, and two thousand 
insects. The first building in which 
this collection was kept burned in 
1885. Through the efforts of the stu- 
dents, the greater part of the speci- 



[ Continued os pace 4 -J 



[Continued on pace 6] 



The College Signal. Tuesday, November 15, I9 ,o. 



THE CO LLEGEjIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 
EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, Editor-in-Chief. 

HAROLD F. WILLARD, 1911, Managing Editor. 
IRVING W. DAVIS. 1911. Alumni Note.. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY. 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYALN.HALLOWELL.1912. Assistant Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912. College Notes. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT, 1912, Department Notes. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALLEN, 1911. Business Manager. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1 9 1 2. Asst. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation 

S. M. JORDAN, Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



pJrtOrfte*** •econd-class matter at the Amherst 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, NOV. 15. No 9. 



The assembly hour of last Wednes- 
day was devoted to a stereoptican lec- 
ture, covering part of Professor 
Waugh's "wanderings" in Europe 
during this last summur. Such a 
lecture was a treat, not only as an 
address but in the personality of the 
speaker, which was manifested. The 
majority of the views shown were from 
Germany. These views, as well as 
the lecture, were very interesting and 
Instructive from a general knewledge 
standpoint; and to those in Pro- 
fessor Waugh's courses they were 
especially interesting. 



field game were not as we wished 
them, yet we feel proud of our team, 
which represented us last Saturday. 
Springfield Training School with its 
heavy team earned one touchdown but 
secured three and in no department of 
the game did they outclass us except 
in weight. Our boys fought the best 
and hardest that they have this season, 
and though the contest did not turn in 
our favor yet we know that they gave 
nothing short of their best and deserve 
corresponding praise. One team had 
to lose and it was our misfortune to 
have that for our fate, yet we have the 
consciousness of doing our best- The 
cheer-leaders deserve a word of com- 
mendation, too, for they worked their 
best, and the loyal supporters have for 
their self-satisfaction the knowledge of 
worthy endeavors in just that proportion 
which they gave support. The un- 
daunted spirit which has now shown 
itself will next Saturday contest with a 
harder proposition and even though the 
outcome may be similar to last week's 
yet the spirit of fight and the feeling of 
the best performed efforts will charac- 
terize and be the result of the game. 



UP. TO- DATE 



w 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 15, 19 10. 



PUMPS 
ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 
TENNIS SHOES 
EXPERT REPAIRING 



The new entomological laboratory 
is now formally one of our buildings. 
The dedication of this laboratory 
reminds us of several things : the 
growth of this institution, the wisdom 
and forethought of those who secured 
the building for us, and the increased 
Interest in the sciences of Entomology 
and Zoology. 

Of course the marked, steady in- 
crease in the number of students and 
a corresponding larger percentage 
desiring courses in Entomology and 
Zoology made more adequate facilities 
necessary, but at large there is a 
broadening in the public mind con- 
cerning the necessity of securing spec- 
ialists for all matters associated with 
Entomology. 

Those who were prominent in 
obtaining the building surely deserve 
much credit, and the commonwealth 
of Massachusetts was indeed liberal to 
furnish us with the iargest, and best 
equipped building in the world for the 
study of Entomology. The first appro- 
priation was for $80,000, for the erec- 
tion of the structure and the subse- 
quent appropriation of $15,000 was for 
fittings and equipment. We can justly 
be proud of this building, its facilities 
and the courses of instruction offered 
In the sciences of Entomology and 
Zoology. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in the 
Signal Office or handed to E. M. Brown 1 1 , on or 
before the Saturday preceding each issue.] 

Nov. 15, 6-45 p. m. Stockbridge 
club in Agricultural recitation 
room. 

7-00 p. m. Glee club rehear- 
sal in chapel. 

7-00 p. m. Dramatic club re- 
hearsal in drill hall. 

16. 3-30 p. m. Cross-country 
finish at Experimet station. 
7-00 p m. Debating club in 
Public Speaking room. 

17. 6-45 a. m. Y. M. C. A. 
in chapel. 

7-30 p. m. Dramatic club re- 
hearsal in chapel. 

18. 3-45 p. m. Clee club re- 
hearsal in chapel. 

19. 3-00 p. m. Football. 
Brown University vs. M. A. C. 
at Providence, R. I. 

20. 9-15 a. m. Sunday talk 
in chapel. 

RESOLUTIONS 

Whereas, It hath pleased Cod in His 
infinite wisdom to take unto Himself the 
■• mother of our beloved friend and classmate, 
I Robert W. Lamson, be it 

Resolved, That we. the memb-rs of the 

! class of Nineteen Hundred and Twelve do 

extend to him and his family our sincere 

1 sympathy in ihis their hour of sorrow ; and 

be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to our bereaved classmate, and that 
a copy be filed in the records of the class, 
and that a copy be published in the Collge 
Signal. 

Ralph R. Parker. 1 

Marshall C. Pratt. [ For the Class. 

Eric N. Boland. j 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



THURBER'S 

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Though the results of the Spring- hour. 



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Good Board and 
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MRS. EI. E. PERRY 

There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

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C. R. ELDER 



"MY WANDERINGS IN EUROPE 



»> 



Professor Waugh Addressed Assembly 
Last Wednesday on His Re- 
cent Trip Abroad. 

At the assembly hour last Wednes- 
day afternoon Professor Waugh gave 
a stereopticon lecture, which he titled 
"My Wanderings In Europe." 

He showed views of Berlin, Strass- 
burg, Venice, Belgium, London and 
Oxford. By way of introducing his 
German views, Professor Waugh said 
that he had made a count of the num- 
ber of the M. A. C. faculty, who had 
gone abroad to study, and found that 
there were twelve. Of the twelve not 
one had gone to England, not one to 
France nor Italy but all had gone to 
Germany, where it is generally consid- 
ered that the best equipped institutions 
and the highest types of civilization in 
the world are to be found. Professor 
Waugh stated that his object in going 
to Germany was primarily for the 
studying of the style and the theory of 
landscape gardening as taught by Prof. 
Willy Lange, one of the most eminent 
landscape gardeners in the world. 
The Berlin views, among which 
were views of Professor Lange 's 
home and gardens, and many of the 
other views were illustrative of parks 
and the continental types of architect- 
ure. One of the most prominent feat- 
ures of all the German views was neat- 
ness combined with simplicity. For 
an example one view was that of an 
imposing buildings with neatly laid out 
grounds, that had been well cared for, 
which had all the appearance of an art 
museum. It was a department store. 
Other views were of small country 
railroad stations which would cause 
several of our own cities to look upon 
with envy. Everything over there is 
well thought out according to some 
plan, and then the plan is put into oper- 
ation and thus we Americans wonder 
at the apparent extravagance of these 
small German towns. Another very 
impressing feature is the street adver- 
tising scheme in operation in most all 
German cities. Instead of having the 
American style, of disfiguring and any- 
thing but beautiful bill boards, they 
have advertising columns on which 
posters are placed. The columns are 
round and about ten or twelve feet high 
and are placed by the government on all 
public corners and squares. All adver- 
tising matter has to go through the 
hands of an official before it is posted. 
These columns are built along artistic 
lines and are far from unsightly. We 
Americans can well follow this scheme 
in beautifying our cities or at least 
some sections of them. 

Another thing which seems peculiar 
to the average American is the large 
number of women who work in the 
fields and in the stores. This feature 
is prevalent to a greater extent in Ger- 
many than on the Continent. Nearly 
all the markets are operated by women. 
This is accounted for by the fact that 



the majority of the men are serving in 
the army and navy. To a certain 
degree the German girls take the place 
of our Italian labors. Professor 
Waugh said that he and his son learned 
more german by going out mornings 
and trading with these German market 
women than could be learned during a 
high school course. 

The views of Strassburg, Venice 
and Oxford were very interesting, 
particularly those of Oxford which 
showed the picturesque style of archi- 
tecture of the buildings of the Oxford 
university. At Venice Professor 
Waugh said he found everything as he 
had hoped, but more picturesque. 
But the most noticeable feature was 
the contrast to the German neatness. 
In Venice everywhere, one sees and 
feels thedirtiness. Venice, while one of 
the most beautiful cities in its pictures- 
que style, is far from being clean and 
neat. 

In concluding his talk Professor 
Waugh said that one does not have to 
go to Europe to see some of the best 
scenes as there are several right in our 
own vicinity and these had a view 
of the chapel Including part of the pond 
shown upon the screen. 

FOOTBALL SCORES SATURDAY 

At Princeton. N. J., Yale 5, Prince- 
ton 3. 

At Cambridge, Harvard 18, Dart- 
mouth 0. 

At Amherst, Amherst 9, Williams 0. 

At Philadelphia, Pa,, Philadelphia 
0, Michigan 0. 

A} Providence, R. I., Brown 50. 
Vermont 0. 

At Hartford, Conn., Trinity 37, 
Haverford 0. 

At Worcester, Holy Cross 0, Wor- 
cester "Tech" 0. 

At Middletown, Conn., Wesleyan 
9, New York university 6. 

At Ithaca, N. Y., Cornell 18, Chi- 
cago 0. 

At West Point. N. Y., West Point 
13, Villanova 0. 

At Middlebury, Vt., Norwich 35, 
Middlebury 5. 

At New Haven, Conn., Harvard 
freshmen 14, Yale freshmen 9. 

At Annapolis, Md., Navy 6, Car- 
lisle 0. 

At Minneapois, Minnesota 28, Wis- 
consin 0. 

At Portland, Me., Bates 0, Tufts 0- 

At Kingston, R. I., Rhode Island 6, 
New Hampshire 0. 

COLLEGE NOTES 

The athletic field has been staked 
out and bids for the grading have been 
received. The football field is to oc- 
cupy the central portion, running north 
and south, and is to be surrounded by 
a running track. 

The dramatic club is preparing for 
its first performance which is to be 
given at Montague, Dec. 8. The cast 
seems to be well picked and the man- 
agement promise a very inter- 
esting performance. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 

Hatters, 

Tailors. 






C&rp?ivter & Morehous?, 

PRINTERS, 






No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 






iioais ( (SioaiBi! 



TOBACCO 



AT 




The College Drug Store 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain Pens ' "'apers 

and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

Ward's "*£%£"*• 



ALL OF THE 

VARSITY MEN 

and most of the upserclassmen 
wear 

DUDLEY 

HAND KNIT 

Shaker Sweaters 

"THERE IS A REASON." 



EDWARD L. HAZEN, *%A 



Af.KNT FOR 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOOx 



AT M. A. C. 









The College Signal, Tuesday, November 15, 19 10. 











FOOTBALL. 

[Continued from flr»t page] 



**rTTV©y; ^vnny^niirv** 



Fxtreme style no longer means extreme 
length. 

A short boxey overcoat for young men 
is one of the season's leaders. 

The pattern is as full of zeal as a zebra, 
good lively colors — just the thing to 
stampede a convention of stand-patters. 



$18. to $25. 



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Westfield, • • - Mass. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

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let it go by and fell on it back of his 
own goal for a touchback. Two penal- 
ties on Springfield and an eight-yard 
run by Moreau brought the ball to their 
twenty-three yard line. Capt. Morse 
then dropped back and kicked a neat 
goal, thus making the score 5 — 3 in 
Springfield's favor. For the remain- 
der of the quarter we held Springfield 
zigzagging between our twenty- five and 
fifty-five yard lines. 

THIRD QUARTER. 

Capt. Morse kicked off to Spring- 
field, who punted to Morse. He was 
tackled in his tracks for first downs. 
Springfield rushed the ball to our ten- 
yard line. We were further forced to 
our three-yard line, where we held like 
a stone wall. Brewer then attempted 
a punt, which was blocked by Howard. 
Metzler then fell on the ball behind the 
goal line for a second touchdown. The 
remainder of the period was spent in 
an exchange of punts, and ended with 
the ball on our forty-five yard line. 

FOURTH QUARTER. 

A double exchange of punts gave 
Springfield the ball. An end run, and 
a forward pass by Springfield brought 
the ball near our goal. Kelly of Spring- 
field made a skin tackle play which 
netted a third touchdown. The re- 
mainder of the period was character- 
ized by an exchange of punts in which 
Gore distinguished himself by receiv- 
ing and making inroads on Springfield's 
territory. Larsen's and Edgerton's 
tackling, Gore's handling of punts, 
and the gaining of ground by Morse 
and Moreau were the distinguishing 
features of the game from a M. A. C. 
standpoint. The line up was as 
follows : 

S. T. S. M- A. C. 

Merner, Deaver, le re, Larsen, Edgerton 
Howard, It rt. Powers 

Delehanty (capt.), lg rg. Walker 

Gregory, c c, Robinson, Johnson 

Collings, rg lg, Hubert 

Briggs, rt It. Heyden 

Swenson. re le, O'Brien, Lane 

Kelly, qb qb. Gore 

Schroder, Merner, lhb rhb, Morse (capt.) 
Home, rhb lhb, Moreau 

Metzler, fb fb. Brewer 

Score— Springfield Training School 15. 
M. A C. 3. Touchdowns — Briggs, Met- 
zler, Kelly. Goals missed- Home 3. Goal 
srom the field— Morse. Referee— A. W. 
Ingalls of Brown. Umpire— A J. Foley of 
Amherst. Head linesman— R. F. Martin. 
Field judge— P. R. Carpenter of Harvard. 
Time — Four 15-minute periods. 

What was lost by defeat was made 
up by the manner in which the students 
stood by the team. Nearly the whole 
college was represented. The student 
body arrived in Springfield at two 
o'clock and with the band at the head 
marched to the field in column of fours. 
The college song, as well as several 
others, was sung and a number of 
cheers were given prior to reaching the 
field. Arriving at the gate it was dis- 
covered that the game had already 
started, so instead of marching around 
the field as was first intended, the col- 




_«mH 



s 



A GOOD THING 



It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right 

Prices %y 50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



Clapp, '12. 



Beers, '12. 



We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



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No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 15, 1910. 



urr.n repaired immediately to the 
bleachers. Here cheer-leaders Nick- 
erson and Harlow took charge and all 
through the game the field re-echoed 
with M. A. C cheers. During the 
intermission between halves both the 
Traininp School and the M A C. 

* » ■■■• ,j 

rooters thronged on the field and per- 
formed marches and counter-marches 
each trying to outdo the other; when 
the team came on the field at the end 
of the intermission it was greeted with 
a shower of confetti and a repetition of 
"long yells." After the game was 
over the student body escorted the 
team back to the Cooley House and 
before disbanding, gave a "short yell" 
for each member of the team. Over 
half of the M. A. C. delegation spent the 
evening In Springfield at the various 
theatres and places of -amusement. 
The last train going north was held 
over to convey the students back to 
Northampton where two special cars 
awaited to complete the trip to 
Amherst. 



SUNDAY MORNING TALK 



SERIES OF CONCERTS 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Announces a series of 

Three Musical Recitals 

in the 

M. A. C. Chapel 

At 8 p. m. 

Dates to be announced later 

Song Recital, "Development of the Opera." 
Wilhelm Heinrich, Tenor. 

Violin and Song Recital. 

Ashton Lewis, Violinist. 
Grace Campbell, Contralto Soloist. 

Folk-Song Recital. 

Alexina Carter Barrell. 

Song Recital, 

"Development of the Opera." 

By Wilhelm Heinrich, tenor soloist at 
Edward Everett Hale's old church. The 
Lenten recitals of Mr. Heinrich are among 
the most interesting of Boston musicals. 

The recital will consist of excerpts from 
the earliest operas down to the modern, 
showing the development of this most im- 
portant field of music. 

Violin and Song Recital. 

Ashton Lewis, violinist, will present a 
program tracing the development of instru- 
mental music through the successive 
schools, the classic, romantic and modern. 
Mr. Lewis is a composer as well, and his 
own composition will represent the modern 
school. 

He will be assisted by Grace Campbell, 
who will sing a number of group songs 
from various nations. Miss Campbell's 
voice is contralto, of rare quality and great 
compass. 

Folk-Song Recital. 

Alexina Carter Barrell has made, while 
studying abroad, a special study of the Folk 
songs of various nations. By temperament, 
training and voice, a rich mezzo soprano, 
she is especially fitted for the interpretation 
of these folk-songs which give to us a cer- 
tain revelation of the inner life of the various 
nations, where the folk-song widely 
flourished. 

Course tickets, . $1.50 

Single tickets, .75 

Students' tickets, 1 .00 



Students at Pennsylvania from forty 
countries have organized the Cosmo- 
politan club. 



Hon. Prank A. Hosmer of Amherst Ad- 
dresses Sunday Morning Chapel. 

The speaker at Sunday morning talk 
was the Hon Frank A Hosmer of 
Amherst. His subject was "Cour- 
tesy." He said in part : 

Some years ago, before the Civil 
War, we might have seen a prairie 
schooner crawling across the plains. 
Near Denver it stopped at a log cabin 
and the head of the family in the 
wagon asked the occupant of the 
cabin, an old man, what kind of a 
place Denver was. He explained that 
his neighbors had treated him unkindly 
back in Massachusetts ; his children 
had trouble at school and church, and 
he wanted to know If Denver was a 
good place in which to settle. The 
old man, however, advised him to 
move on, saying that he would find 
things much the same at Denver, so 
the man and his family continued their 
journey. 

A few hours later another schooner 
came along, and practically the same 
conversation ensued with this excep- 
tion : — the people had regretted very 
much leaving the old home in New 
England ; there, the neighbors had 
loved and respected them and many 
had wept to see them depart. The 
old settler was a wise observer and he 
told the people to make their home in 
Denver. "You will find things just 
the same there," he told them. Sue 
cess or failure lies with the individual ; 
wherever he goes his life, his environ- 
ment will be just as he himself makes 
it. If he Is kind, courteous and con- 
siderate of others, his way will be a 
path of roses ; if he is rude and care- 
less in his habits, thoughtless as 
regards the welfare of others, his path 
will be overrun with thorns. 

Many are naturally gentle and cour- 
teous; others are rude and careless 
because no friend has pointed out their 
defects. Many years ago a Frankish 
knight was entertained by an Arab 
chieftain. After he had left, a slave 
was sent after him with a very polite 
message from his master. In it the 
Arab told how much he had enjoyed 
the knight's company and then called 
attention to a little bad habit of speech. 
In applying this story to M. A. C. stu- 
dents, Mr. Hosmer said, Let it be 
said of all, that you are gentlemen. 
Everywhere the fact that you are stu- 
dents is reason enough for your being 
courteous. You are like the old 
French noblemen who felt it their duty 
to be kind and courteous towards all, 
because of their position. You are 
students of a state college with a trust, 
and it is for you to live up to that 
trust. 

There is a time for all things, in 
their place. On the football field, it 
is expected that a man will let himself 
out, but in anyone's parlor it is also 
expected that he will conduct himself 
as becomes a gentleman. He will 



LABORATORY FERTILIZERS 

There are forms of nitrogen in the market which are more 
or less inert, including many so-called tankage <>' bloods, which 
are dried and ground, either separately or mixed with good tank- 
age or dried blood, and sold to dry mixers or home mixers as 
tankages, much as a little cream used to he mixed with oleo- 
margarine to give it the aroma and taste of butter. These, if 
only " dry mixed," while giving goods that may show up well 
in the laboratory, do not show up well in the field, for they have 
not been properly cooked, as it were ; and liter all, it is the fold 
test which tells the story. The practical farmer who is growing 
quick crops for quick returns wants goods that will act during 
the current season. He considers the following season when he 
gets to it. 

"For the /.ami's Smkt" Stud* the Ptm*t Foo,i Problem. 



60WKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



I. Iff. LABROVITZ 

THE 

Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits and Overcoats To Order 
Always a large and select line of Foreign and Domestic Woolens. 

Dyeing, Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing a Specialty 

A guaranteed fit in all the latest kinds of garments. 

Renovated Suits For Sale. 

A first-class line of dent's Furnishing Goods always on hand. K. Kr W. 

Collars and Dress Shirts. Satisfaction guaranteed in every transaction 



1 1 Amity Street, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Tel. 302-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

' liss Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and Class 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 



PHOTOOHAVUKES 

WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 






The College Signal, Tuesday, November 15, 1910. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 




not put his feet on his host's polished 
table or expectorate on the floor. In 
short it is not supposed that he will act 
like a Philistine, who Is, according to 
1 Matthew Arnold, a person deficient In 
culture and without appreciation of the 
finer things. In Queen Elizabeth s 
time Sir Philip Sidney, who, as he lay 
dying on the battle-field, refused a cup 
of water, in order that a brave soldier 
might have it, Is a model of noble 
manhood. 



{Jybt^^&tetftf-JW 



• • • A A A A A A A ♦ • * • * 
,•■••••>•■•••••• 



NEW BUILDING DEDICATED 

[Continued from first pace- 1 



AMHERST HOUSE 

BARBER 
SH0P-t> 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



THE OLD CORKER DRUG STORE. 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block, 



Phoenix Row 



STEAM PITTING, Telephone 59—4. 

GAS FITTING, TINNING, 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



J. H. TROTT 

Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

I31£IVTAI^ ROOM A 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 
OtolU AtMi LOOtoSl'-M. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, • Mass. 



Olvmpia Candy Go. 

257 Main St., 
Northampton, - - Mass. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



mens were removed from the burning 
building, and the development of these 
departments continued. At this time 
the collection was valued at two thou- 
sand dollars. 

In the following year Professor 
Charles H. Fernald became connected 
with the college and began a long 
period of very efficient service, de- 
voting the major part of his profes- 
sional efforts to developing a distinct 
department of entomology. He was 
directly responsible for the founding of 
the graduate school, and since his re- 
tirement last summer from the college 
faculty he has been chosen honorary 
director of this school. Post graduate 
work is an increasingly attractive work 
for students and graduates of other 
colleges. Professor and Mrs. Fernald 
have compiled a card catalog, which 
is highly recommended, and the pro 
fessor is well known and widely appre- 
ciated for his work in entomology. 

Hon. Frank A. Hosmer made a 
few remarks in presenting Governor 
Draper's quill pen to Professor Fernald, 
who accepted It on behalf of the col- 
lege. This pen signed the building 
appropriation bill, which enabled us to 
acquire this splendid equipment. 

The dedicatory address was deliv- 
ered by Dr. L. O. Howard, Washing- 
ton, D. C, Chief of the Bureau of 
Entomology. He advocated watching 
the market for educated men in order 
that university teachers could turn stu- 
dent applicants into the right channels. 
He asserted a confidence in men 
turned out from M. A. C. entomologi- 
cal laboratories, and added that they 
ranked well in bureau work. Thirty- 
seven years ago there were only five 
trained entomologists in this country. 
Today the bnreau at Washington em- 
ploys six hundred twenty-three men, 
including one hundred thirty-one trained 
entomologists. This department ex- 
pends annually one million of dollars in 
its work. In closing, he pointed out 
that the dedication of this splendid 
building was a further evidence of the 
rapid progress which entomology is 
making in the economical world. 

After a few remarks and the formal 
dedication of the building by Chairman 
Dr. H. T. Fernald, the exercises were 
ended, and the guests were invited to 
inspect the building. 

The enrolment this year at the 
school of journalism of the University 
of Missouri is 125. 



The SHOP THAT LEADS 



ALSO 



AGGIE SHOP 

NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



Wright 
& Ditson 

Football and Basketball suits 
the standard at all leading 
colleges. The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
( iuards the best and most pract- 
ical, also Skates and Hockey 
Goods. The Wright & Dit- 
*V son Sweaters have 
la long been recognized 
m W mt as the best. 

/^L> College Students and Athletes 

{^tSr- who want the real, superior 

«■•. ^^ articles for the different sports 

«■••'»'•<"' should get the kind that bear 

our trade-mark. Catalogue Jree. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

22 Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

76 Weybosset Street, Providence, R. I. 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



pi. J. Lpne, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



BOrO-LIVEBY-HOBSE 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 183. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 15, 1910. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



THE 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

37 Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only Jrom z A. M. to 4 A. M. 



FRANK S. O'BRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND HACK 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 



8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, - - MASS. 

Telephone 



NEW ANIMAL HUSBAN 

DRY BUILDING. 

Those of the students electing agri- 
culture who have taken the courses In 
live stock judging during the past three 
years will appreciate greatly the value 
of the new building being erected just 
to the south of the horse barn and east 
of the dairy barn. It will now be possi- 
ble for the men who wish to study the 
types and best conformation of the 
various breeds of animals to do so in 
a comfortable building and with facili- 
ties for seeing just what the instructor 
is attempting to demonstrate. 

The Animal Husbandry or stock 
judging building is a rectangular build- 
ing 80 x 50 feet. It encloses an arena 
78 x 35 feet, and has on the west side 
five rows of seats, rising from the 
arena in such a manner that every 
seat will command an unobstructed 
view of all parts of the "ring. " 

On the eastslde is a brick walk, 6 
1-2 feet wide, railed off from the floor 
where the animals are to be ahown, 
and planned largely for the accommo- 
dation of occasional visitors during 
regular class sessions, as well as for 
those who will undoubtedly be present 
during the various winter meetings, 
the Short Course, Farmers' Week, 
and other similar occasions, Cases 
containing various articles of equip- 
ment necessary in the handling and 
management of live stock are to be 
built along this walk into the east wall 
of the building. Just above this walk 
is a balcony, somewhat similar to the 
one in the Drill Hall, but extending 
the entire length of the building, and 
designed to furnish two rows of seats. 
Without providing seats in the arena, 
about 300 people can be accommoda 
dated. 

The most essential part of the build- 
ing is the arena. In the constuction 
of buildings of this sort by other agri- 
cultural colleges there have been two 
general plans followed. One was to 
build a round pavilion, with seats for 
students rising from the ring around 
the entire building. The other is that 
of having a rectangular arena, with 
seats arranged on one or both sides, 
and sometimes in case it is necessary 
to accommodate very large crowds, 
with seats on the ends also. It was 
decided to follow the latter plan here 
because It is difficult to make a round 
building of such size that enough ani- 
mals can be shown for a large claas, 
and at the same time allow Deople In 
every part of the building to see the 
particular point that the demonstrator 
may be explaining. Another objection 
against the round building is that for 
horse judging the ring cannot be made 
large enough to show the paces of the 
animals properly, a very essential point 
in determining the merits of classes of 
this sort. The arena here is eighty 
feet long, and so arranged that horses 
can be driven in directly from outside, 
and in going before the students, will 
exhibit their very best paces under the 
most favorable conditions. The arena 




1 ■ ■ ■ "- '' ■, 



FATIMA 









TURKISH 

BLEND 

CIGARETTES 





Wi'.h each package of 
Fatima ;,ou get a pop •- 
lar actress ' photogra, i 
— also a pennant ccti- 
pon, 25 of which secure 
a handsome fJt col.egt 
pennant ( 1 2i32)—*c- 
1 of 100. 






GEOMETRY 



No elaborate design, t\o 
intricate proof is needed to 
establish the superiority of 
Fatima Cigarettes. 

Just start one — and as the 
fragrant smoke draws a figure 
on the blackboard of your 
mind, their rare qualities ap- 
pear as an Axiom — a self- 
evident fact. 

They are good from every 
angle, and generous, too — 
20 for 15 cents in an in- 
expensive package, but you 
get ten additional cigarettes. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 



f! 






: .v 






.... ■ ■ ^^;^M^■;^;; : |^;:^ l .;;. |: .;^;^;;' ^/,:fffv,■;■'■^$>:ffa 

,■•■ • ■ I ■ •■■■•-• ■ • ......■..■■ '■■■!- Ill I H I " 




THE H. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



I 



STAMFORD, CONN. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. W. Blaney, 'n, 

C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, K. L Winn, 87 

Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursdays, 

Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays. 



BASSALOTTI & GENTASO 

FRUIT. 

CONFECTIONERY. 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

BRICKS TO TAKE HOME. 

CORNER AMITY «t PLXASAMT STREETS 



Great River Wafer Power Co. 

E. A. &* .V. A. ALLEN* /'tops. 
Office, Gillett Mock. 

WESTFIED, MASS. 



ROOMS WITH HEAT, 
POWER <£ LIGHT 

FOR RENT 



BALED SHAVINGS 

put up in attractive shape, 
in car lots. 



PRICE! ON APPLICATION 






8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 15, 1910. 



will be covered with tan bark as are 
most show rings. 

Under the seats on the west side, 
detention stalls are planned, where 
stock for class work will be brought at 
times most convenient for the farm 
iieip, to be brought into the ring im- 
mediately when desired. These stalls, 
entered from the west side, will pro- 
vide quarters for stock loaned the col- 
lege for demonstration of types not 
found in the college herd, and being 
separated from other barns and stables, 
will be a good quarantine. 

Not only will the building be used 
for classes in stock judging but exer- 
cises and practical work In the handl- 
ing of live stock, their management 
and training, will be given here. It 
will prove an invaluable aid during the 
short course, since so much of that 
work is of the practical, objective sort, 
and its usefulness will be amply shown 
on such occasions as farmers' week. 
It marks a much need advance in the 
equipment of the Division of Agricul- 
ture and will put the work in Animal 
Husbandry on a new and a far more 
satisfactory basis than work in cold 
barns, snow storms and icy yards have 
given in the past. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Has started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of foui year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 

FORESTRY, 



W'ANTBD 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course .s open to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford a splendid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

Kenvon L. Butterfield, President. 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



BY THE- 



Library of the Mass. Agr. College 



College Signal, March 22 and June 14, 
1910. 

Farm-Poultry, Feb. 1, 1908, 19:3. 

Farmers' Bulletins, 45, 70, 125, 321, 336, 

3»4- 

Mass. State Agr. Exp. Station, Bulletins, 
1 — 14 inclusive. 

Wisconsin Agr. Exp. Station, Bulletin, 
140. 

Any of the above items will be grate- 
fully received. 

Charles R. Green, Librarian. 



BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society, 

Debating Council, 



Amherst, Mass. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

Herbert W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

Leon E. Fagerstrom, Jr., Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill, President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

John E. Dudley, Jr., President 

Raymond C. Barrows, President 

Irving C. Gilgore, President 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber 5hop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST, MASS. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

Pressing, 



When Fitting Out Your Room 



Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters 
Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 
Towels, Etc. Also denims for 
that corner seat. 



for 



BEST of Cleansing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



CARS 



JACKSON fir CUTLEJ? 



Leave AG(ilE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AQQIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mim. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Cart at Reasonable Rates 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS of 



Boot & Shoes Repaired 



FIRST CLASS WORK 



Amherst, 



Mass. 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, %2. Weekly, $1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



tfS 



cS?> e 



Vol. X'^ttf 



CP 



SSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 22, 19 10. 



No. 10 



t OOTB ALL 

Team Outclassed by Brown. Ball 

Placed on Brown's One-foot Line 

by Gore and Moreau. 

The heavy Brown team rolled up 49 
points against us last Saturday. The 
game was featured by many brilliant 
dashes and four penalties, Brown be- 
ing penalized twice. 

Not only did our men make a 
plucky resistance but they threw a 
scare into the Brown camp when 
Moreau made a 35-yard run to the 
one foot line. 

Gore and Moreau were our best 
ground gainers and Gore several times 
tackled, the runner when he had eluded 
the rest of the team. 

For Brown, Crowther made many 
brilliant runs and it was his tackle that 
prevented our scoring. McKay, Young 
and Hugh made good gains through 
the line. 

FIRST PERIOD. 

Sprackling ran Goodnough's kickoff 
to his 40-yard line and on second 
down punted to our 30-yard line where 
it became Brown's bail on a fumble. 
Sprackling drop-kicked a goal for the 
first score, 3-0. 

Smith received the second kick-off 
and after an exchange of punts between 
Brewer and McKay, Sprackling threw 
a forward pass which though fumbled 
was recovered by Adams on our 5-yard 
line. High put the ball over in two 
rushes. Smith kicked the goal. 

The play for the rest of the period 
was in our territority but it was not un- 
til near the close that McKay made 
the second touchdown and Smith 
failed on the goal 1 4-0. 

Ashbaugh ran the next kickoff to his 
45-yard line and an on-side kick gave 
Massachusetts the ball on our 35-yard 
line when time was called. 

SECOND QUARTER. 

Bingham went in for High and Crow- 
ther for Sprackling. Goodnough could 
not gain so Brewer punted to Brown's 
40-yard line. McKay and Bingham 
failed to advance the ball and on an 
attempted forward pass it became our 
ball in the middle of the field. Gore 
made 10-yards on quarterback run 
and Moreau then added 5 more. On 
the next play Brown was penalized for 
off-side. Gore then made 5-yards 



M. A. C. MEN AT WASHINGTON 



CROSS COUNTRY 



Pres. Butterfield. Pres. W. E. Stone of 

Purdue, Dr. E. W. Allen and Dr. H. 

J. Wheeler Prominent in Meetings. 

All the M. A. C. men may well 
take pride in the prominent part taken 
by their Alma Mater at the recent 
meetings of scientifc workers in agri- 
culture at Washington, D. C., Nov. 
10-18. These bodies are national in 
scope, among them being the Associa- 
tion of American Agricultural Colleges 
and Experiment Stations, the Associa- 
tion of Official Agricultural Chemists, 
the American Assoclaticn of Farmers' 
Institute Workers, the Association of 
Feed Control Officials, the American 
Society of Agronomy, and the Society 
for the Promotion of Agricultural 
Science. 

M. A. C. was formally represented 
at most of these gatherings. Presi- 
dent Butterfeld, Dr. H. T. Fernald. 
Prof. J. A. Foord, Prof. W. D. Hurd 
and C. H. White '09 being present 
from the college, Director W. P 
Brooks 75. H. D. Haskins '90 and 
P. H. Smith '97 from the Experiment 
Station, and W. H. Bowker '71 from 
the board of trustees. An even larger 
number of alumni were in attendance 
as representatives of other institutions. 

The influence of the college was 
especially noticeable in the sessions ot 
the Association of American Agricul- 
tural Colleges and Experiment Sta- 
tions, composed mainly of college pres- 
idents, station directors, and others in 
administrative positions. There were 
about 180 delegates and visitors at 
this convention, and of these fully 20 
had been associated as faculty or stu- 
dents with M. A. C. — a remarkable 
showing when it is recalled that over 
50 colleges are represented in the 
associaton. It is believed that no 
college in the country made a better 
record In this respect, and Michigan 
alone was a serious rival tor first honors. 

Nor was this position of leadership 
merely one of numbers. Professor 
Brooks served as one of the vice-pres- 
idents and Dr. E. W. Allen '85 of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture was 
chosen first vice-president for the 
ensuing year. Dean J. L. Hills '81 
of the University of Vermont, as for 
many years was secretary and treas- 
urer and W. E. Stone '82 of Purdue 



DRAMATICS 



R. C. Barrows Winner of Cross Country 

Run, Lowering Last Year's Record 

by Two Minutes, 57 Seconds. 

The assembly hour of last Wednes- 
day was given up for the benefit of the 
cross country run. The run was held 
over the usual course from Sunderland 
village, the new finish being establish- 
ed at the cross-walks. 

Sixteen men were entered and every 
contestant linished the race. This 
fact, as well as the record-breaking 
time of R. C. Barrows '11, marks 
the race as the most successful one 
ever held. The first runners registered 
better time than the previous record 
for the course, and while the weather 
conditions were particularly favorable, 
only superior running will account for 
the fast time registered. 

Early in the race the runners kept 
fairly well bunched, but the steady 
pace, which Barrows set, soon gave 
him a wide lead as is indicated by the 
fact that he breasted the tape one 
minute and a half ahead of the near- 
est runner. Caldwell, Molr, Hutchins- 
and Southwick finished in the order 
given and formed the other members 
of the quintet entitled to the cups offered 
for individual honors. 

Aside from the desire for individual 
honors, the fight for possession is keen 
because of class rivalry, and the 
method of determining the winning 
class team. The Juniors, Sopho- 
mores and Freshmen were each repre- 
sented by a team of five men, while 
the Seniors had only one man entered. 
The system of scoring was as follows, 
twenty points for the dinner and a de- 
duction from the preceeding score of 
each successive runner, according to 
his position at the finish. The Junior 
team won the race with the score of 
65 points, the Sophomoes were sec- 
ond with a score of 61 points, the 
Freshmen third, score 54 points and 
the seniors last with twenty points. 

Time, 34 minutes 29 seconds; 36 
minutes 10 seconds. 



placing the ball on our opponents 30- 

j 1. 1* .u i„^ r nn A university, a member of the executive 
yard line. Morse then replaced Good- : ^ M _ M d ..»»-_*_ij 

nough but his try for a field goal failed, 

Crowther getting it on his 5-yard line. 

On a series of eight rushes Brown 

brought the ball to our 35 yard line 

and Crowther skirted the end for a 

touchdown. Smith kicked the goal. 

20-0. 



[Continued on p»e« *■! 



committee. President Butterfeld 
headed the important committee on 
extension work, before which came 
many matters of national importance. 
Director H. J. Wheeler '83 of the 
Rhode Island station was reappointed 
a member of the committee on exper- 



[ConUnu«d OS (*C« *•! 



Poin 


ts 20. 


1. 


Barrows '11. 


• 1 


19; 


2. 


Caldwell '13. 


!< 


18; 


3. 


Molr '13. 


« 1 


17; 


4. 


Hutchins '12. 


1 ( 


16; 


5. 


Southwick '12. 


■ ( 


15; 


6. 


Shaylor 14. 


II 


14; 


7. 


Sahr '14. 


■ 1 


13; 


8. 


Burr '12. 


II 


12; 


9. 


D. F. Baker '13. 


1 • 


1 1 : 


10. 


Sanctuary '12. 


■ 1 


10; 


11. 


Munroe '14. 


.1 


9; 


12. 


Frye '14. 


II 


8; 


13. 


Noyes '12. 


II 


7; 


14. 


Mailed '13. 


■ c 


6; 


15. 


Clark '14. 


1 1 


5; 


16. 


Cooper '13. 


Judges. 


Professor Howard, S. C. 


Brooks 'IC 


.F. 


L. Thomas '10. 


Time-keepers 


J. N. Summers, 


Dr. 


P. L. 


Reynolds, R. W. Piper '11. 



Plans for Prize Contest in Dramatic 
Readings Arranged by Pro- 
fessor McKay. 

In order to bring out the latent dra- 
matic ability and awaken among the 
students greater interest in the art ot 
public speaking and dramatics, Mr. 
McKay is organizing a special contest 
In dramatic reading which may be 
used as a subject in Public Speaking 
during the month of January. This 
contest will be open to Freshmen and 
and Sophomores. 

ELIGIBILITY. 

Contestents must be regular Fresh- 
men or Sophomores. 

All selections presented shall be 
dramatic readings, and not speeches 
or extracts from speeches. They 
must be approved by the Instructor In 
charge of Public Speaking. 

All selections shall be memorized 
and no contestant shall be prompted. 

All men desiring to enter shall no- 
tify the instuctor in charge of Public 
Speaking at least one week before the 
preliminary contests. 

PRELIMINARIES. 

The contestants shall be assigned to 
groups for the preliminary contests, and 
as a result the judges shall choose six 
men who shall enter the final contest. 

FINAL CONTEST. 

The six men thus selected shall 
compete In the final contest. The 
selection used may or may not be the 
same as that presented In the prelim- 
inaries. In case two or more con- 
testants have chosen the same dra- 
matic reading, the preference shall be 
decided by lot. The judges shall base 
their decision upon excellence of pre- 
sentation. 

PRIZES. 

The prizes will h« announced later. 

TIME OF CONTEST. 

The preliminaries will be held dur- 
ing the week of January 16th to the 
20th, 1910, and the final contest at 
Assembly on Wednesday, Jan. 25th. 

EXPENSES. 

Contestants may enter free of charge . 

ORDER OF SPEAKING. 

In the preliminary and final contests, 
the order of speaking will be deter- 
mined by lot, subject to such changes 
as may be mutually agreed upon. 

Members of the Freshman and 
Sophomore classes are urgently re- 
quested to avail themselves of this 
opportunity as it will, in a great meas- 
ure, aid in picking members for the 
Dramatic Society. Interest along such 
lines needs to be aroused at M. A. C. 
and it Is by such contests that this In- 
terest can be aroused. 



1 






The College Signal, Tuesday, November 22, 1910. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, Editor-in-Chief. 

HAROLD F. WILLARD, 1911, Managing Editor. 
IRVING W. DAVIS. 1911. Alumni Notes. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY. 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYALN.HALLOWELL.19I2, Assistant Editor. 
ALDEN C BRETT, 1912, College Notes. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT, 1 9 1 2 . Department Notes. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALLEN, 1911. Business Manager. 

ALBERT W.DODGE. I <5 1? Asst. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN. Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, NOV. 22. No 10. 



Recently the matter of allowing 
athletes on trips excuses from classes 
was brought before the students' atten- 
tion. Heretofore the custom has 
been for the Athletic Board to issue 
excuses covering the period of absence 
at the recommendation of the manager 
of that team. 

The Signal before saying anything 
on this subject wished to know the 
practice in other institutions and so 
communicated with a few colleges, 
and extracts are taken from the 
replies : 

"At Tufts college there is no sys- 
tem of allowed absences. It is 
assumed that all students obliged to be 
absent for any reason will take such 
steps as are necessary to get in touch 
with class work. Our instructors con- 
sider athletic dates whenever possible 
in giving the time of tests or other 
special work. 

"The members of the football team 
have this year been granted additional 
chapel absences to cover their trips, 
but there is no faculty rule upon the 
subject." 

At Trinity college a certain number 
of cuts is allowed per term. 

Article 1, Section 4 of extracts from 
Faculty Rules reads as follows : — No 
excuse for absence from town in con- 
tion with any athletic or other col- 
lege organization will be granted unless 
application be made in advance to the 
committee on Athletics and College 
Organizations, and the list of students 
permitted by them to be absent filed 
at the College office. 

Article II, Section 9. In the case 
of absences excused by the President, 
by the Medical Director, or by the 
Committee on Athletics and College 
Organizations, the work omitted may 
be made up at any time within two 
weeks from the time of the student's 
return to duty. After the expiration 
of this period no work may be made 
up with credit. 

Below are paragraphs taken from 
rulings of the special faculty com- 
mittee; — 

Managers of all college teams must 



present proposed schedules to the Fac- 
ulty Committee on Athletics and Col- 
lege Organizations before concluding 
an agreement with any other teams. 

At least twenty-four hours in 
advance of home contests, and twenty- 
four hours in advance of starting for 
contests elsewhere, managers must 
present to the chairman of this com- 
mittee on a blank to be had at the 
office of the Treasurer a list of all pro- 
posed contestants with the name of 
the manager who is to accompany 
them, together with the Registrar's 
certificate of their academic eligibility. 
In games away from home the hour of 
leaving and returning will also be 
indicated. 

No mid-week games may begin 
before four o'clock p. m. 

From these extracts we see that at 
Tufts college where no cuts are 
allowed the faculty make special pro- 
visions for examinations, etc., but all 
the work lost by absences is supposed 
to be made up. At Trinity college 
absences are given athletes and vari- 
ous organizations besides their regular 
cuts, but the members must make up 
their work within two weeks. 

The conditions at Williams college 
are somewhat similar. Athletes and 
members of some other organizations 
may get the "bunched cut" privilege 
by application to the Dean, who de- 
cides whether the reasons are ade- 
quate, or if he does not feel able to 
decide, the matter is referred to the 
committee on administration. This 
privilege provides that a man, if the 
total number of cuts he is allowed 
amounts to say 25, can take all those 
cuts in one course, if the outside work 
requires it. He is not allowed any 
more cuts than any other man. except 
in special cases. If an athlete has 
used all his cuts on trips and has other 
trips to make, he can secure special 
cuts for this purpose, after satisfying 
the Dean that the former cuts were 
used legitimately. 

At M. A. C. we now have cuts but 
absences incurred by athletes and 
others belonging to organizations, 
which make trips, are obliged to use 
their allowed absences. Doesn't it 
seem fair to excuse a student if he 
will make up his work within a stated 
time: for he has spent much time in 
trying for the college teams, etc. and 
if not excused, he does more work for 
his college and has the benefit of 
fewer cuts. Moreover, an athlete may 
play on two teams and may overcut in 
a single semester. Can this matter 
j not be arranged more satisfactorily? 

SUNDAY MORNING TALK 

At the Sunday morning Talk, the 
Hon. Henry Bond of Greenfield, spoke 
on "The obligations of Citizenship. " 
He said in part: 

People are just learning that politics 
is a part of religion and that religion is 
a part of politics. Once Paul was 
assailed by a mob in Jerusalem and was 
in grave danger of his life. He said, "I 



UP -TO - DATE 



FOOTWEAR 



PUMPS 



ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 



TENNIS SHOES 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 22, 1910. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



THURBER'S 

COLLEGE LUNCH 



AMIICKST, MAS! 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



KODAKS 



EASTMAN'S FILMS 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 

SUPPLIES 



DEUEL'S 



Drug Store 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



CAP & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



The Prospect House 

Good Board and 
Clean, Airy Rooms 

MRS. E. E. PERRY 

There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



OF 



am a citizen of no mean city. I am a ' 
citizen of Tarsus and a Roman." His 
treatmei.t was changed immediately 
because his citizenship was a power 
behind him. If any of you are ever in 
trouble in a foreign land, you will find 
that the fact that you are an American 
citizen will be a sword in your hand. 

Citizenship means membership In 
the nation. When the Union is 
threatened, as in the time of the 
Spanish war, there is no difficulty in 
getting men to enlist for the service of 
their country. Today in times of 
peace there is great difficulty in get 
ting men for the miiitia and the navy. 
Citizenship is along that line. Nearly 
every man would giadly sacrifice his 
life or his property for his country, but 
it is the minor cases that *e neglect. 
Voting is the privilege a citizen has 
announcing his opinion on certain mat- 
ters. There are different methods of 
voting. With one exception these 
methods are lacking in one essential 
point, there is no way of knowing how 
a man votes. Tne exception is the 
roil-call, in use in most legislatures. 
In the roll-call a nan must answer to 
his name, yes or no. There must be 
an answer, and it goes on record 
where it can be seen at any time. At 
the state election one year ago, 12^ of 
the registered voters failed to vote. 
They neglected their most important 
duty as citizens. 

Another duty, often neglected, is a 
willingness to hold office. There is no 
lack of candidates, there is however 
often a lack of the right kind of candi- 
dates. We should look over the num- 
ber of candidates and select the man 
who seems to be best fitted for the 
office. The office should seek the 
man instead of being sought after by 
the man, as is the usual case today. 
The men who refuse offices give many 
reasons. They do not care to with- 
stand criticism or be cartooned by the 
newspapers, their actions are sure to 
be misconstrued, the associations are 
not exactly what they like. Regard- 
ing the last excuse, no man in any 
walk of life will be able to find con- 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



OF 



Cigars 4 tlgueiift 



TOBACCO 



A T 



C. R. ELDER 



The College Drug Store 



genial associations always. There are 
men who are seeking public office for 
what they can get out of it, others for 
the honor and the power that it brings. 
That in itself is not right, but no mat- 
ter what their motives may be we have 
no right to criticise any public servant 
until we are willing to take our part 
in public service. 

The citizen should keep himself 
informed in public matters. Publicity 
is a treatment that should be given 
anything into which the public is put- 
ting its money, corporations, acts of 
the legislatures and of congress. 
Such publicity enables the voters to 
select the proper man for an office. 

Opposition to dishonesty in public 
service resulted several years ago in 
the coinage of a new word "graft" in 
public service- Milwaukee, San 
Francisco, Philadelphia and in our 
own state, Lawrence shows the results 
of graft. Grafting is the selling of 
one's trust for gain. We see it every- 
where in congress and state legislature 
where the members trade their votes. 

Still another obligation of the citizen 
is being progressive. Politics should 
be progressive and men of initiative 
are needed, men who can pick out the 
best course and then have the initia- 
tive to proceed. The power of initia- 
tive is the keynote of success for 
young men, and the state wants men 
who will not vote right but who will 
think out constructive legislation so 
that the Commonwealth will come up 
slowly but surely a little higher each 
year. 

COLLEGE NOTES 

David Heatley 'ex- '12, is around 
college for a few days. 

The walks for the new entomolog- 
ical laboratory have been staked out. 

The elective blanks for the sopho- 
more electives of next semester have 
been sent around to the members of 
the class of 1913. 

Last Tuesday evening Professor 
Waugh gave a very interesting talk, 
on the possibilities in Landscape Gar- 
dening, to the Junior Landscape Club. 

The department of Pomology has 
received several new lockers which 
will be set up in the fruit storage room. 
This will supply a long needed place 
for the students to keep their tools. 

The rifle team will begin practice 
on the indoor range Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 15th. About forty new men have 
signified their intention of coming out 
for the team. Sixteen new indoor 
rifles have recently been received from 
the Springfield armory. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

Union college has begun its 115th 
year. 

The annual report of the Williams 
baseball association for last season 
shows a balance of $710, which is 
considerably smaller than the previous 
year, when the surplus was more than 
$2000. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
\ to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

'Hie Kail Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 

OIK'. 

Wt solicit your consider.! 
tion. 

Sanderson 
k Thompson, 

Clothiers, 

Hattei 

Tailors. 



£&rp{tvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Established 



1851 



Eimer & Amend 

205-2 II Third Ave, Cor. 18th St. - - - New Yo; 



HKADQU tRTKKJ Foi 



Chemicals, Chemical, Physical, Bacteriological 
Apparatus and Assay Goods 

We carry the largest stock of Laboratory Supplies in the U. S. 

PROMPT SERVICE 



Our European connections are such that w< tit enabled to offei VOU 

the I ; vice for duty-free importations on s< ientifu supplies at the 

lowest prices. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 22, 19 10. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 22, 1910. 




,»»»■» .*M1) 




M. 



COLLEBE MEN NO LONGER FOLLOW THE FASHIONS, 
BUT FASHION FOLLOWS THEM, 

Incompliance wl h lli«-ir <l.-mttii<l w« have iiih.I.- 
for this aeaaon a new atyle of winter ault "adapted 
from the Kiifclinh." 

It's built on rational Unea-rathar close fitting 
no padding on the ahoulders, a «oft roll to the 
lapel and other point* In strong contrast to the 
exaggerations of the past years. 

The cloth comes in a variety of novel patterns. 

Price S20, «22.flO and »«5. 

OvitciihIh equally new In design, S18 to S30. 

COOLEY BROTHERS 

WESTKIKLU, MASS. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



A. C. MEN AT THE WASH 
INGTON MEETINGS 

[Continued from first psgs.l 

iment station organization and policy, 
and W. H. Beal, a former member of 
the Mass. Experiment Station staff was 
elected permanent secretary of the 
experiment station section. 

President Butterfleld opened the 
meeting of the section of the conven- 
tion devoted to extension work, with a 
paper outlining the present status of 
agricultural extension. At one session 
of the experiment station section, 
devoted to Adams Fund investigations, 
M. A. C. furnished two of the three 
speakers, Dr. Allen discussing the 
scope, purpose, and planning of such 
investigations and Dr. Wheeler the 
records and publication of such work. 

President Stone contributed a nota- 
ble paper in the general sessions on 
proposed Federal legislation pertaining 
to agricultural education and A. C. 
Monahan '00 spoke briefly of the work 
which he is beginning in the U. S. 
Bureau of Education for agricultural 
education. 

On Thursday evening the various 
M. A. C. men then in the city, 19 In 
all, gathered at the Cosmos club for 
dinner. Later in the evening, Presi- 
dent Butterfleld briefly outlined the 
outlook at the college and Dr. Fernald 
described the new entomological 
building. 

In addition to the men already men- 
tioned, the following alumni were in 
attendance at some of the meetings : 
F. S. Cooley '88, now of the Montana 
Agricultural college ; S. W. Fletcher 
'96, Director of the Virginia Station; 
Prof. W. E. Hinds '99 of the Ala- 
bama College and Station; E. W. 
Morse ex- '94, W. A. Hooker '99 and 
H. L. Knight '02 of the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture; and C. H. 

Griffin '04. 

Howard L. Knight, '02. 




A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
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Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 
know that their shoes are 

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Prices $3. 50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



Clapp, '12. 



Beers, '12. 



We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



H. W. FIELD 

... FLORIST ... 



M. D. OILMAN. C. A. MOFFET. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

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Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

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Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



BROWN GAME. 

[Continued from first pags] 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



OPP. ACADEMY OF MUSIC, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 




CAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



Crowther received the next kick-off 
and McKay made 5 and then 8 yards, 
a forward pass brought them to the 
center of the field. Here Crowther 
fumbled and Lane fell on the ball. 
Moreau gained 5 yards in two rushes 
and Brewer punted to Crowther on the 
35-yard line. An intercepted forward 
pass made it Massachusetts ball on 
Brown's 48-yard line. Gore made 8 
yards and Moreau added 5 more. 
Brewer failed to gain but on the next 
play Moreau ran 30 yards until tackled 
by Crc .her on the 1 foot line. Brewer 
failed to gam and time was called. 
20--0. 

SECOND HALF 

The second half opened with Sprack- 
ling and High In again. McKay re- 
cieved the kick-off and ran almost to 
the middle of the field. After a series 
of eight rushes McKay scored another 
touchdown and Smith kicked an easy 

goal. 

After the next kick-off there were 



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Amherst, Mass. 



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Passenger and 
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Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
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several punts exchanged until finally It 
became Brown's ball on our 30-yard 
line. McKay put it over in four 
rushes and Smith kicked the goal. 

Smith ran the next kick-off to his 
40-yard line and after an exchange of 
punts it was Massachusetts ball on our 
25-yard line. 

FOURTH PERIOD. 

Gore could not gain so Brewer 
punted, the ball rolling to our oppon- 
ent's 25- yard line. A series of 
plunges brought the ball to our 53-yard 
line. McKay made 15 yards through 
the line and then went around end 
for 30 yards more. Marble plunged 
the remaining 8 yards for a touchdown 
but Smith missed the goal. 37-0. 

Crowther received the next kick-off, 
after a series of rushes, a forward pass, 
Crowther to Ashbaugh netted 40 yards 
and on the next play McKay went 
through for a touchdown and then 
kicked the goal. 430. 

The last score came after Smith's 
punt had been run back to our 35-yard 
line. Crowther made first down and 
then the ball was rushed to our 3-yard 
line. Snell made a vard and Crowther 
went over for the touchdown, McKay 
kicking the goal. 49-0. 

Crowther received the last kick-off 
and after a series of rushes it was 
Brown's ball on our 25-yard line and 
time was called. 

The line-up : 

MASSACHUSETTS. BROWN. 

Larsen. re le, Adams, Jarvis, Ashbough 
Powers, rt It, Kratz 

Hubert, rg lg, Goldberg, Kulp 

Johnson, c c, Season 

Griffin, lg rg, Corp, Babbington, Goldberg 
Hayden, Samson, It rt, Smith, Bartlett 

Lane, Obrien, le re, Ashbaugh, Mulcahy 
Gore, qb qb, Sprackling, Crowther 

Goodnough, Morse. Smith' rhb 

lhb. Young, Marble 
Moreau, lhb rhb, McKay, Warner 

Brewer, fb fb. High, Brigham, Bean, Snell 
Score— Brown 49. Massachusetts 0. 
Touchdowns — High, McKay 4, Crowther 2. 
Marble. Goals from touchdowns— Smith 
4, McKay 2. Goal from field— Sprackling. 
Referee — Murphy of Harvard. Umpire- 
Farmer of Dartmouth. Field judge— Foley 
of Amherst. Head linesman— Curtis of 
Brown. Time — 14 minute periods. 



TEAM STATISTICS 

The varsity football team of the pres- 
ent season was made up as follows: 

Captain Morse '11, quarterback, 
age 20, height 5 ft. 5 in., weight 158 
lbs. Captain Morse prepared for col- 
lege at Salem high school. During 
his sophomore and junior years 
here, he played in every game and 
his work at quarter-back has been con- 
sistent and brili'ant. He is especially 
strong at running back punts, while his 
kicking in 1909 many times prevented 
a blank slate on our side. Morse has 
played in seven games this season. 

Robinson * 1 1 , center, age 20, 
height 5 ft. 9 1-2 in., weight 205 lbs. 
Prepared at Mechanics Arts high 
school, Boston, and is one of the heavy- 
weights of the team. He has played 
in two games. 



McGarr '12. guard, age 21, height 
6 ft., weight 170 lbs. McGarr pre- 
pared for college at Worcester high 
school and has played seven games 
this season. 

Moreau '12, fullback, age 20, 
height 5 ft. II In., weight 170 ibs. 
Turners Falls is Moreau's high school 
and he has played in five games. 

Walker '12. tackle, age 21, height 
6 ft. 1 in., weight 175 Ibs. Walker 
attended Marlboro high school. He 
has played varsity football three years, 
taking part in seven games this season. 

Huntington '13, halfback, age 19, 
height 5 ft., 8 3-8 Inches, weight 152 
lbs. Prepared at Lynn English high 
school. He has played six games this 
season. 

Samson '13, tackle, age 19, height 
6 ft. 4 3-8 in., weight 202. This 
Vermonter prepared for college at 
Burlington high school and has played 
in every game this season. 

Larsen '13, end. age 20, height 5 
ft., 7 1-2 in., weight 155. He 
attended Bridgeport high school and 
has played in every game. 

Goodnough '13, half back, age 23, 
height 5ft. 7 in., weight 144 Ibs. Good- 
nough was captain of the Wesleyan 
academy team of 1908 which was not 
scored on during the season, he was 
also picked for All Western Massachu- 
setts interscholastic quarterback. He 
has played in seven games. 

Hayden '13, tackle, age 20, height 
6 ft., weight 189 lbs Hayden was 
captain of Beverly high school team 
In 1909. He has played In nine 
games. 

Lane '13, end, age 19, height 5 ft. 
8 in., weight 155. Goddard seminary 
1909. Eight games. 

O'Brien '13, end, age 20, height 5 
ft. 10 in., weight 159. Wayland high 
school. Four games. 

Gore '13, quarterback, age 19, 
height 5ft. 6in., weight 138 lbs. Gore 
was sub quarter last season. He pre- 
pared in Quincy high school and has 
played in five games. 

Hubert '13, tackle guard, age 24, 
height 5 ft. 7 In., weight 165 Ibs. 
He was for two years captain of the 
Atlanta Baptist college team at 
Atlanta, Ga. and was chosen All 
Southern colored half back. 

Griffin '13, tackle, age 20, height 
5 ft. 9 In., weight 165 lbs. Although 
a new comer Griffin certainly "made 
good" in the Brown game and he can 
be expected to "do things" next 
season. 

Putnam '13, guard, age 20, height 
5 ft. 9 In., weight 190 Ibs. 

Edgerton '14, end, age 21, height 5 
ft. 8 in., weight 158 lbs. Prepared 
West Springfield high school. Edger- 
ton has played In four games. 

Smith '14, halfback, age 18, height 
5 ft, 8 in., weight 148 lb. Graduated 
from Mechanics Arts high school Bos- 
ton. Played in two games. 



M. A. C. WINS 

At the recent New England Corn Show, the 
Grand Howker Prize S500 went to an "Aggie" hoy, 
Perley E. Davis, '94, of Granby, Mass., for the best 
yield of corn from one acre, showing on a water free 
basis the largest amount of food constituents. 

His yield as harvested was 1.7 Imshrls shell- 
ed corn; corre cted to 12% moisture, it figured 
103.23 bushels. Protein Content 1173%: I «t 
4.13; Nitrogen Free Extract 80. 1 1 ; Fibre 146; 

Ash 1.57. 

He planted yellow flint seed of his own breeding ; cultivated 
according lo his best knowledge, and used our Btockbridge 
Special Manure foi Corn. A COMplete story of the contest will 
be published soon and will be Interesting t<> all agriculture! 
students. Send your name for a copy. 

" Stu,ly til? plant food problem. " 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



I. RE. LABROVITZ 

THE 

Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits and Overcoats To Order 
Always a large and select line of Foreign and Domestic Woolens. 

Dyeing, Pressing, Gleaning, Repairing a Specialty 

A guaranteed fit in all the latest kinds of garments. 

Renovated Suits For Sale. 

A first-class line of Gent's Furnishing floods always on hand. K. & VV. 

Collars and Dress Shirts. Satisfaction guaranteed in every transaction 



1 1 Amity Street, 



Tel. 302-4. 



Amherst, Mass. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 




Iflkf 






Fraternity 


and 




**fcS^ 






and 


Invitations 




cg^T 






Class Inserts 


Menus 














for Annuals 


Leather Dance 




ill 


ii 


[0 






Fraternity 


Cases and 




1(1 


1 






and Class 


Covers 












Cards 


Stationery 


Wedding 


Invitations and 


Calling 





1 



PIIOTOGHAVURI5S 

WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 22, 1910. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 22, 1910. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 



1 ^ 



English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



..•.•.•..•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•••••.••••••••••••••••'•'••••••••••••'•'• 






THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes, 



THE OLD CORKER DRUB STORE. 



I 102 Main St. Northampton, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



J. H. TROTT 



Nissen '14, halfback, age 20. height 
5 ft. 7 in., weight 155 lbs. Boston 
Mechanics Arts high school. Played 
in one game. 

Powers, '14, guard, age 25, height 
5 ft. iO 3-4 in., weight 168 lb*. Pre- 
pared at Maiden high school. Powers 
played varsity football last year aid 
has played in evefy game this season. 
Johnson '14, center, age 22, height 
5 ft. 9 1-2 in., weight 159 lbs. Grad- 
uaduated from Mechanics Arts high 
school, Boston. Has played nine 
games this season. 

Williams '14, halfback, age 22, 
height 5 ft. 9 1-2 in., weight 165 lbs. 
Graduated from Williston academy. 
Has played five games. 

Brewer '14, halfback, age 20, 
height 5 ft. 9 in., weight 165 lbs. 
Altnough a member of the freshman 
class Brewer shows form both in tlu 
serin mage and at punting which will 
make him a man to be reckoned witn 
next year. 

As a whole the team has been very 
light, especially in the back-field, ana 
this will account somewhat tor tht 
inability to gain through the line b> the 
old methods against heavy teams such 
as Dartmouth and Brown. The nsw 
open game helped overcome this dis- 
advantage to some extent, but the 
inability of the line to hold at the cru- 
cial moment many times resulted dis 
astrously in blocked punts or incom- 
pleted forward passes. Although the 
season cannot be said to nave been 
eminently successful with the loss ot 
only two of the old men and a large 
incoming freshman class we can look 
for better results next year. 



AMHEPST HOUSE 

BARBER 
SH0P-t*> 



The SHOP THAT LEADS 



ALSO 



AGGIE SHOP 

NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



Holland's Block, 



Phoenix Row 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 30-1 2. 



STEAM II I TING, telephone 59—4. 

., \- PITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

Spt-d.ilu of R epa i rin g 

CHURCH Windows, 

Mkmdkiai, Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c> 

6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 

FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, - Mass. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S 

DKXTAL ROOMS 
Williams Block, Amhhrst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 
BtoU§A>M«ti0OtoaP>M. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gai admin- 
stered when desired 



Olvmpia Candv Co. 

257 Main' St., 
Northampton, - - Mass. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



DRAMATIC SOCIETY NOTES 

At the regular monthly meeting of 
the Dramatic Society last Tuesday 
evening it was voted that Mr. Zabriskie 
be sent to Boston to witness a perfor- 
mance of "The Private Secretary" In 
which William Gillette is starring at 
the Hoilis Theatre. Mr. McKay pre- 
sented hs plan for a special contest in 
dramatic reading to be held during 
January, before the society and it was 
approved. A discussion of the proba- 
ble exoense for the ensuing season 
followed, after which the meeting ad- 
journed at 8-05. 

The play is progressing rapidly and 
through the combined coaching of 
Prof. McKay and James K. Milis 77, 
an excptionally good production is 
forthcoming. Mr. Mills has offered 
his services bcth as a coach and as a 
make-up artist, and all who have been 
so fortunate as to have tne benefit of 
his coacning, know that a better man 
cannot easily be found. 



& Ditson 

Football and Basketball suits 

the standard at all leading 

colleges. The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 

( iuards the best and mostpract- 

ieaL also Skates and Hockey 

Goods. The Wright & Dit- 

JL son Sweaters have 

fesi^J long been recognized 

■r as the best. 

• College Students and Athletes 

nS gf> ) mho want the real, superior 
«■«. ^.m^ articles for the different sports 
u. m. -at U1 , should get the kind that heat 
our trademark. Catalogue free. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

22 Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

76 Wevhosset Street, Providence. R. I. 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 
& Pressing Rightly 

Moir '13 portrays admirably the 
apparently conservative and refined Agent for Laundry, H. W. Blaney, 'n, 



type of English gentleman well ad- 
vanced in years, but whose past, if re- 

1 vealed, would tell a very different 

' story. 

John Dudley '11, impersonates the 

1 care free youth of modern times whose 



C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, E. L. Winn, 87 
Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursday 
Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses. 
carnations.violets andchysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed onlyjrom 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Great River Water Power Co. 

E.A.SrS.A. ALLEN, r >,>/>*. 
Office, Gillett Block. 

WESTFIED, MASS. 



ROOMS WITH HEAT, 
ROWER <£ LIGHT 

f*o re re b iv t 



BALED SHAVINGS 

put up in attractive shape, 
in car lots. 



PRICE ON APPLICATION 



FRANK S. O'BRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND MACK 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, I'arties 



8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, - - MASS, 

Telephone 



greatest torment in life seems to be 
an unpaid tailor's bill, the fear of 
which haunts him throughout the play. 

Simmons '14, makes an ideal Eng- 
lish tailor whose greatest ambition in 
life is to " soar " above the lower class 
and become one of the "upper ten 
thousand." 

Nickerson '11. Here we have the 
regulation English brother, stiff and re- 
served in his bearing, whose fear of a 
possible burglar creates a laughable in- 
cident during the third act. 

Reid '14, gives an excellent rendi- 
tion of a writ server who is instrumental 
In removing certain difficulties which 
if not cleared up, are liable to produce 
disastrious results. 

A shy little girl with a captivating 
manner aid a charming grace. In 
spite of this fact she is not immune to 
Cupid's d*rt. Question who is she ? 
Why, Wilde M2. 

C-a-t-t-e-r-m-o-l-e, that's the name 
and Mr. Zabriskie '13 here takes a 
difficult part. His gruff, self impor- 
tant manner is bound to hold the inter- 
est of his hearers. 



FOOTBALL SCORES SATURDAY 

At New Haven, Harvard 0, Yale 0. 

At Portland, Me., Bowdoin 5, Wes- 
leyan 0. 

At Ann Arbor, Michigan 6, M nne- 
sota 0. 

At West Paint, West Point 17, Trin- 
ity 0. 

At Boston, Holy Cross 14, Tufts 0. 

At Easton, Pa., Lafayette 14, Le- 
high 0. 

At Annapolis, Navy 9, New York Uni- 
versity 0. 

At Baitimore, Carlisle 12, Johss 
Hopkins University 0. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGGIES 
REMEMBER! ! 1 - 

On Friday evening, Dec. 2d, in the 
Hotel St. Denis, bioadway and 11th 
Street, Captain Fowler will order the 
attack on the Banquet Hall, at quar- 
ter past seven by the clock. The 
attendance will be one hundred or 
more ; if you have not positively given 
notice of your intention to be present, 
please act. Corne, moreover, early for 
registration and ante-prandial felLw 
ship. The man whose evening clothes 
are absent must not keep away; dress 
according to the tenets of Levi Stock- 
bridge sufficient ; overalls unnecessary. 
By order of the executive committee: 

John A. Cutter, M. D., '82, Sec. 



ALUMNI NOTES 
Among the alumni at the Spring- 
field game we-e Lyman '71, Walker 
'05, Hall '06, Chapman, Summers 
and Watts '07, Coleman and J. A. 
Anderson '08, Caffrey, W. E. Geer, 
Hubbard. Neaie, Ide, Noyes, Webb 
and Waters '09, Haynes and McLaine 
'10 and Rockwood ex-' 10. 

'08. — James A. Hyslop is author 
of Part 7 of Bulletin 85 of the U. S. 
Bureau of Entomology, on the Smoky 
Crane -fiy. 




» ■ ■ ■ » — ^- — 
., 



» i 



FATIMA 




; 



With each package of 
Fatima you get a pen- 
nant coupon, 25 of 
which secure a hand- 
tome felt college pen- 
nant ( / 2x32)— je/ec- 
Hon of I UO. 



TURKISH 

BLEND 

CIGARETTES 

GRAMMAR 

Ungrammatically written 
but correctly said: Fatimas 
are the "most different" 
cigarette in every way. 

A "capital*' smoke far 
ahead of their " period." 

The cool, sweet smoke 
of a Fatima forms " ! ! ! ! " 
of goodness, pleasure and 
complete satisfaction. 

Made of rare tobaccos 
skillfully blended, inexpens- 
ively packed but you get ten 
additional. 20 for 1 5 cents. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 



■■'! . »'■ , - TV! . ' , * . ,. T*TT ". - ■ ■ ■ ' 1 ■ 



ifM'tnli'lull" 




THE tl. L. FROST & BARRETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 

STAMFORD, CONN. 



There Is As Much Difference Between Cenuine Thomas 

Phosphate Powder 

And other so-called "Beetle Slags" as there ii between .< high-grade 
mixed fertilizer and a poor one. 

Professors Maenker and Wagner have experimented with sixteen 
different makes of liasic Slags, and find that they vary in effetf <>n growing 
crops from eighteen to one hundred per Cent 

The Total Phosphoric Acid may appear all right in doubtful Bask 
Slag, but remember it is Available Phosphoric Acid that you are seeking. 

We are Sole Agents for the Atlantic Seaboard for the Largest 
Producers in the World of 

Genuine Thomas Phosphate Powder 

(Basic Slag Phosphate; 

Manufactured bf the improved German Method, and guaranteed of 

High Availability. 

It is, as you know, the best source of Phosphoric Acid and Lime, 
especially for Fruits, Legumes, Grass and Cereals. 

Special Literature free if you mention the College Signal. 



The Cob- Mortimer Company 



Special Importers 



24-26 Stone St. 



New York City 



JOHN WOJTASZCZYK BASSALO TTI & GKNTASO 



Boot & Shoes Repaired 

FfttST CLASS WORK 

Amherst, ... Mass. 



FRUIT. 

CONFECTIONERY. 
SODA AISO 

ICE CREAM. 
IKICKI ro 1 ak I NOME. 

CORNER AMITY & PLEASANT S I Khl. 1 9 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 22, 1910. 



IB. J. Laporle, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



lllirO-LIVERBORSE 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 183. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 

Ward's Fountain I'ens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

Ward's ""ESSr* 



ALL OF THE 

VARSITY MEN 

and most of the upserclassmen 
wear 

DUDLEY 

HAND KNIT 

Shaker Sweaters 

"THERE IS A REASON." 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Has started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 

FORESTRY, 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course .s open to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford a splendid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

Kenyon L. Butterfield, President. 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society, 

Debating Council, 



EDWARD l_. HAZEN, '14 



Herbert W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

Leon E. Fagerstrom, Jr., Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill, President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

John E. Dudley, Jr., President 

Raymond C. Barrows, President 

Irving C. Gilgore, President 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



agent for 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



AT M. A. C. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



CARS 



Leave AQQIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

1 96-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Leave AMHERST for AGGIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Car* at Reasonable Rate* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, $2. Weekly, %i. 




OLLEGE 



V 

MASSACHliShi IS A(,KICULHiKAL 



•LJ he 




Vol. XXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 6, 1910. 



No. 1 1 



M. A. C. MEN BANQUET 



TRACK 



At New York. Twenty-fifth Anniver- Call for Candidates. Prospects for a 
sary of the Club. Successful Season 



On Friday, Dec. 2nd, about ninety 
M. A. C. men sat down to a banquet 
at the St. Denis hotel in New York. 
At this twenty-fifth reunion of the club 
much enthusiasm and keen interest 
was manifested in the progress and 
affairs of the college. Many of the 
men arrived early In the evening to 



The winter season started Wednes- 
day, Nov. 30 with a large number out. 
Though there is a large squad report- 
ing daily for practise, there is still 
good material which has not reported. 
These men may be holding back for 
some good reason but it is hoped that 
every man with any track ability what- 



VESPERS 



Dr. Samuel Eliot of Boston Talks at 
First Sunday Afternoon Meeting. 

The first vesper service of the year 
was held in chapel last Sunday at 5 
p. m. Dr. Samuel Eliot of Boston 
gave a most interesting and scholary 
address, and his thought was centered 
on the text "And there was a rainbow 
round about the throne." 

"The rainbow has always been a 




M. A. C. FOOTBALL SOUAO 1910 



Suf-fltHi ■ 



WEDNESDAY ADDRESS 

Capt. George C. Martin Introduces Stu- 
dents to Philippines. 

The assembly exercise of last week 
was in charge of Captain George C. 
Martin who spoke on the Philippines. 
"When one attempts to describe 
the natives of the Philippines a diffi- 
culty at once arises, since they differ 
from each other in the same locality 
as well as in different localities. Thus 

of a 

dlcate 

this 



d and 
ndred 
ss are 
jy are 
When 
ner by 
inable 
d so 
to his 
:y and 
prion 
everal 
eated 
•Idlers 
by the 
imboo 
»ed to 
srlcan 

ire up 

rd of 

valor 

•art of 

killed 

1, but 

they 

itence 

gamy 

They 

> and 

s. yet 

;als to 

style. 

it It is 

"take 

3ws In 

small 

finely 



The growth of the college for a 
period of the last twelve years Is steady 
and for the first time in the history of 
the college a freshman class entered 
with a number of 160. 

The recently established department 
of extention work has more than justi- 
fied itself; for the call for lectures, 
and correspondence courses, Better 
Farming Trains and Trolley Trains, 
and the demonstrative orchards are 
making the whole state a class room. 
The duty of a state college is to reach 
all, t<5 provide better agriculture and 

[Continued on p»ge 4] 



college men and their problems. The 
reputation and message of the speaker 
merit a full house. State Student 
Secretary King, until recently of the 
faculty of Columbia University, is also 
to be present. The usual Y. M. C. 
A. meeting will not be held. Hear 
Pointius. 



Prof. Harry G. Chase, the athletic 
adviser, said the other day : "It is by 
no means an idle rumor that football 
will be abolished. I give for the 
reason the lack of alumni support and 
the present financial condition." 



not impiy crinuisiiiie;*!*, iue«igciiie:>:> ui 
thought, or lack of action, but a clear- 
ness in thought and a seeking after the 
best in others. 

The character of a man who is 
simply enduring his lot is not com- 
plete. He lacks among other things, — 
cheerfulress. God has given us a 
world which Is brimming over with de- 
light, and the larger part of a man's 
life should be to appropriate It. "To 
see things as they might be Is a far 
better standard." Never doubt the 
reality of the joys of imagination. 

[Continued on pact 5.] 



pUII&llCU lUMiiium, «uiw 



Wl V^t 1 1. 



w K . floors. 

The Filipino cannot do enough for his 
guests, and his entertainment, music, 
food, and dancing, are splendid. 

Houses are extremely scarce on the 
Islands, caribou being much more 
common as a beast of burden. The 
roads are almost Impassable for 
wheeled vehicles, hence the usefulness 
of the horse Is deceased. The Import- 
ant occupations are, agriculture and 
the manipulations of large fisheries. 

This state of civilization is only 
found on the cast and among a few 

[Continued oapaf* 5] 






The College Signal, Tuesday, November 22, 1910. 



PI. J. Laporie, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



BUrO-LIVERY HORSE 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 183. 




THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Has started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 

FORESTRY, 



ASK VOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 

Ward's Fountain Pens, FMne Papers 

and KnveloDes. Students' R a w wH — Thic «.;n mmW -* t„~ 

Send : 
tions, 
Hanqi 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



Wa 



VA 



and 



Sha 



'Tl 



EDW 



DUDL 



BOYDEN'S 



Restaurant and Bakery 



Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



bpnngueiQ KepuDiican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, $2. Weekly, %i. 



JL X \* ■• 



p 



** 



r To^ lYv W 



OLLEGE 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 




Vol. XXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 6, 1910. 



No. 1 1 



M. A. C. MEN BANQUET 



TRACK 



At New York. Twenty-fifth Anniver- Call for Candidates. Prospects for a 
sary of the Club. Successful Season. 



On Friday, Dec. 2nd, about ninety 
M. A. C. men sat down to a banquet 
at the St. Denis hotel in New York. 
At this twenty-fifth reunion of the club 
much enthusiasm and keen interest 
was manifested in the progress and 
affairs of the college. Many of the 
men arrived early in the evening to 
recall class relationships and to see old 
friends. At a short time before eight 
o'clock the banquet was begun and 
from then until after midnight M. A. 
C. was the important topic. 

Dr. John A. Cutter '82, as toast- 
master, in introducing President But- 
terfleld referred to the accomplish- 
ments of the early presidents, French, 
Stockbridge, and Clark, who worked 
so zealously for the institution. The 
class relations between '81 and '82 
were touched upon and his friendship 
for the president of the M. A. C. 
alumni club, A. L. Fowler '80. 

Pres. K. L. Butterfield spoke in 
honor of those who had founded and 
worked for the alumni club, which had 
such a warm interest and keen enthus- 
iasm in college affairs. Moreover, 
the trustees appreciated the growing 
alumni interests and felt that the duty 
of the college was to keep the college 
and alumni together. 

In speaking of recent events, the 
death of Dr. C. A. Goessmann was 
first referred to. On Oct. 12th, a 
memorial service was held for him, 
who, full of years, was held in the 
honor and devotion of many students. 
At this service addresses were given 
by Professor Chandler and Dr. Stone, 
intimate acquaintances of his. Pro- 
fessor Fernald resigned at the close of 
the college year and by special vote 
was placed on the Carnegie Fund. 
The new entomological laboratory was 
dedicated in honor of Professor Fer- 
nald. Dean Mills, after a serious 
illness, was granted a year's leave of 
absence, which caused a distinct loss 
to the administration department. 

The growth of the college for a 
period of the last twelve years is steady 
and for the first time in the history of 
the college a freshman class entered 
with a number of 160. 

The recently established department 
of extention work has more than justi- 
fied itself; for the call for lectures, 
and correspondence courses, Better 
Farming Trains and Trolley Trains, 
and the demonstrative orchards are 
making the whole state a class room. 
The duty of a state college is to reach 
all, to provide better agriculture and 

[Continued on page 4] 



The winter season started Wednes- 
day, Nov. 30 with a large number out. 
Though there is a large squad report- 
ing daily for practise, there is still 
good material which has not reported. 
These men may be holding back for 
some good reason but it is hoped that 
every man with any track ability what- 
ever will come out. It is a duty of 
every man in the student body to help 
to get these Ynen out if they wish to 
see the best team possible representing 
the college. 

The men will be coached by Cap- 
j tain Dudley and ex-Captain Dickin- 
son who has very willingly consented 
I to help in this department. Both men 
have had a wide experience not only 
in high school but in college. They 
have been members of this college 
team for the past two years having 
done remarkable work. The men 
under this coaching will without doubt 
be whipped into a condition which will 
enable them to make fine showings at 
the big meets. 

The men whio have reported for 
the week are : 1911, Captain Dudley, 
Barrows, Nielson; 1912, Tower, 
Dodge, Fowler, Southwlck, Hutch- 
ings, Clapp, Burr; 1913, Caldwell, 
Kelley, Whitney, Sirex. Baker, Cobb; 
1914, Wheeler, Leete, Shaylor, 
Davies, Edwards, Allen, Lucas, 
Jacobs, Besser, Nlcolet, Eldridge, 
Harris, Howard and Sibley. 



PONTIUS COMING. 

International Y. M. C A. secretary 

: Pontius of the Department of the East 

i is to visit the college next Thursday. 

I He will speak at a special meeting for 

i men to be held at 6-30 in the evening. 

The question of bettering college life 

at M. A. C. will be discussed in 

straight-from-the-shoulder style by a 

; man whose work brings him into touch 

, with all the colleges of the eastern 

states. The men who attend this 

address will hear some plain talk about 

college men and their problems. The 

reputation and message of the speaker 

merit a full house. State Student 

Secretary King, until recently of the 

faculty of Columbia University, is also 

to be present. The usual Y. M. C. 

A. meeting will not be held. Hear 

Point i us. 



Prof. Harry G. Chase, the athletic 
adviser, said the other day : "It is by 
no means an idle rumor that football 
will be abolished. I give for the 
reason the lack of alumni support and 
the present financial condition." 



VESPERS 



WEDNESDAY ADDRESS 



Dr. Samuel Eliot of Boston Talks at 
First Sunday Afternoon Meeting. 

The first vesper service of the year 
was held in chapel last Sunday at 5 
p. M. Dr. Samuel Eliot of Boston 
gave a most interesting and scholary 
address, and his thought was centered 
on the text "And there was a rainbow 
round about the throne." 

"The rainbow has always been a 
symbol of beauty, while the throne has 
represented power. Thus in the text, 
beauty is the halo of power, the crown 
that of strength. 

No life is complete when it is simply 
powerful or only beautiful. We all know 
men of the forcible type whom we 
may respect, but cannot love. We 
have also met attractive men who lack 
manliness, and whom we cannot, there- 
fore respect. Such men as Cardinal 
Richelieu, Napoleon, and Bismark, 
all wonderful statesmen, illustrate 
strength of character, but they are 
lacking in beauty. Goldsmith, on the 
other hand, illustrates a success so 
sensitive that it often shrinks from the 
moral obligations of stern principle. 

Cromwell was an example of the 
man of iron will, who never shrank 
from executing the duties which stern 
principle required. 

The man of the hour is the man 
who can do things, yet the efficient 
man is essentially the gentle man. 
Such was Lincoln, upon whose should- 
ers was laid as heavy a burden as ever 
a man bore. In spite of the burden, 
his innate cheerfulness and sense of 
hur was strong enough to sustain 
him through trials, and although he 
had a reputation for hard-headedness, 
he was far better known for his tender- 
ness. 

When a man adds to efficiency a 
thoughtful kindness and an overflow- 
ing good- will, he is attaining beauty of 
character. It is not necessary to look 
so much for big things as for a pleas- 
ant way of doing little things. In this 
age of hustle and confusion simplicity 
has an added charm. Simplicity does 
not imply childishness, meagerness of 
thought, or lack of action, but a clear- 
ness in thought and a seeking after the 
best in others. 

The character of a man who is 
simply enduring his lot is not com- 
plete. He lacks among other things, — 
cheerfulness. God has given us a 
world which is brimming over with de- 
light, and the larger part of a man's 
life should be to appropriate it. "To 
see things as they might be is a far 
better standard." Never doubt the 
reality of the joys of imagination. 

[Continued on par* 5.] 



Capt. Qeorge C. Martin Introduces Stu- 
dents to Philippines. 

The assembly exercise of last week 
was in charge of Captain George C. 
Martin who spoke on the Philippines. 

"When one attempts to describe 
the natives of the Philippines a diffi- 
culty at once arises, since they differ 
from each other in the same locality 
as well as in different localities. Thus 
in describing the peculiarities of a 
Filipino, the observer must indicate 
the exact district from which this 
Filipino comes. 

The islands are eleven hundred and 
fifty miles in length and six hundred 
and fifty in width. The natives are 
known for their cruelty but they are 
also noted for their kindness. When 
Capt. Roberts was made prisoner by 
the natives, he found himself unable 
to eat Spanish cooking, and so 
solicitous were his captors as to his 
comfort, that they sent out a party and 
kidnapped the cook from the American 
camp. On the other hand several 
officers were outrageously maltreated 
by the insurgents, and many soldiers 
lost their lives or were maimed by the 
pitfalls, prisoned arrows, and bamboo 
traps which they constantly devised to 
hinder the progress of the American 
army. 

These natives would not measure up 
to the New England standard of 
honesty, but they combine great valor 
with religious fanaticism. A part of 
their belief is that they cannot be killed 
if the leader makes that assertion, but 
even if they should be killed, they 
believe that a new and better existence 
will open up for them. Polygamy 
does not exist among them. They 
regard silverware, linen, tables and 
chairs as superfluities at meals, yet 
they know how to serve meals to 
guests in correct American style. 
The bed is merely a mat, so that It is 
an easy thing for a Filipino to "take 
up his bed and walk." Windows In 
the houses are constructed of small 
shells, and the rooms contain finely 
polished furniture, and well kept floors. 
The Filipino cannot do enough for his 
guests, and his entertainment, music, 
food, and dancing, are splendid. 

Houses are extremely scarce on the 
islands, caribou being much more 
common as a beast of burden. The 
roads are almost impassable for 
wheeled vehicles, hence the usefulness 
of the horse Is deceased. The import- 
ant occupations are, agriculture and 
the manipulations of large fisheries. 

This state of civilization is oniy 
found on the cast and among a few 

[ConUnuad oa paf* 5. J 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 6, 1910. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, Editor-in-Chief. 

HAROLD F. WILLARD, 1911, Manatfne EAtor. 

IRVING W. DAVIS, 1911, Alumnt Notet. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY, 1911. Competition Editor. 

JYALN.HALLOWELL.1912. Assistant Editor. 

DEN C. BRETT, 1912. College Notes. 

RSHALL C. PRATT, 1912, Department Notes. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

fARK W. ALLEN, 1911, Business Manager. 

ALBERT W.DODGE, 191 2. Asst. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN, Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, DEC. 6. Noll. 



The Signal wishes to congratulate 
Manager C. C. Pearson and Captain 
H. C. Walker and sincerely hopes 
that they may have a very success- 
ful season next year. 



used certain players enough times so 
that they will receive their letter and 
yet not play in any of the games dur- 
ing the latter part of the season. The 
system is unfair because one player 
receives the same recognition for play- 
ing in parts of five games that a player 
receives for playing all of every game 
in the season. 

A scheme allowing a man his letter, 
if he work all the season on the squad 
and plays in at least two quarters of 
the two principal games would be fairer 
than the scheme now in vogue. It 
has been suggested that we call the 
New Hampshire and the Training 
School games the important ones at 
present. Under special conditions the 
Athletic Board might grant letters to 
other deserving Individuals. 

This system would make a lessened 
cost to the athletic association because 
of fewer sweaters for varsity players; 
it would place fewer restrictions on a 
coach in using material to develop 
the best team ; and it would make a 
letter harder to obtain and conse- 
quently more prized. 



The Signal wishes to thank those 
alumni who have kindly sent in notes 
and notices concerning other alumni, 
and especially those who have reported 
meetings of M. A. C. men or alumni 
banquets. 



UP - TO - DATE 



FOOTWEAR 



PUMPS 



ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 



TENNIS SHOES 



EXPERT REPAIRING 






PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



In the recent sophomore-freshman 
football game, the one thing noticeable 
next to the surprising score, was the 
large amount of new material which 
showed up. To have a freshman team 
with three regular players win by a 
score of seventeen points against a 
sophomore team with eight varsity 
players shows that the new material 
must be good. Perhaps over-confi- 
dence may explain part of the outcome 
of the contest, but just here we can 
not refrain from a word of censure: 
that such material should be present 
and yet not out for the college team is 
not right. That material should have 
helped make the varsity better this 
year, besides receiving coaching for 
next year. So next season report for 
practice, and to those fellows who do 
not play, let us say that it is your duty 
to see that the others come out. 



Dec. 



Dec. 



For the past two years the same 
dissatisfaction is shown after the foot- 
ball season that has been manifested 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in the 
Signal Office or handed to E. M. Brown 1 I . on or 
before the Saturday preceding each Issue.] 

Dec. 6—6-45 p. m. , Stockbridge club 
in Agricultural recitation room. 
7-00 p. m., Glee club rehearsal 
in chapel. 

7-00 p. m., Dramatic club 
rehearsal in drill hall. 
7 — 3-30 p. m., Assembly, Mr. 
Harry Kimball, Boston. 
7-00 p. m., Debating club in 
Public Speaking room. 
8 — 8-00 a. m., Chapel exercise 
at which freshmen pledge them- 
selves to fraternities. 
6-45 p. m., Y. M. C. A. in 
chapel. 

7-30 p. m., Dramatic club 
rehearsal In chapel. 
9 — 4-45 p. m., Glee club re 
hearsal in chapel. 
8-00 p. m., Dramatic club pre- 
sents " Private Secretary" at 
Montague. 
JO — 3-00 p. m., Hockey with 
Williams at Williamstown. 
4-00 p. m., Informal at Drill 
hall. 
II — 5-00 p. m., Vespers, Rev. 
Thomas Van Ness of Boston. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



THURBER'S 

COLLEGE LUNCH 

AMIIICWM-r, MASS. 



SOMETHING NEW 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 



// 



Dec. 



Dec. 



Dec. 



CORK TIPS 



AND 



III 




Makers 
of 



CAP & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Tuesday afternoon at one o'clock 
this year concerning the awarding of ! Artnur ]_ Dacy '02, gave an illustrated 



Ms. It is evident that the present 
system is inadequate and unfair. 

To allow an M to any one who plays 
in parts of five games lessens the value 
of the letter in the opinion of the stu- 
dents and limits the coach about using 
players. When a coach has to 
develop a line or a backfield, the best 
chance he has to find out the ability of 
the players and to determine what 
mbination of players is strongest, Is 
use them in intercollegiate games. 
he time the coach is satisfied that 
knows his best lineup he may have | 



lecture on practical forestry in French 
hall. 

At the close of assembly hour last 
Wednesday afternoon the assistant 
manager for the football team of next 
year was elected. There were five 
men nominated for that position by the 
men who made their M this year. 
The men were Clark, Covill, Griggs, 
Roehrs and Tupper '13. The ballot 
was as follows: Covin 111, Griggs 69, 
Roehrs 87, Clark 53, Tupper 38. 
I Covill was declared elected. 



DEUEL'S 



Drug Store 



The Prospect House 

Good Board and 
Clean, Airy Rooms 

MRS. E. E. PERRY 

Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 6, 1910. 



NOTICE. 

Friday evening, December ninth, 
has been chosen for the annual college 
social evening. The students are ask- 
ed to assemble in the Drill Hall at 
eight o'clock. 

The women of the college in estab- 
lishing this social evening as an annual 
occurrence hope to have it regarded as 
an occasion on which no formality of 
dress is desired, and as an opportunity 
for all members of the college to be- 
come better acquainted with each 
other. 

Under the direction of Professor 
McKay the students will provide en- 
tertainment, and ice cream and cake 
will be served by the college women. 

It is hoped that every member of 
the college will do all that he can 
toward making it a success for M.A.C. 



FIRST ENTERTAINMENT 

The first of a series of entertain- 
ments given under the auspices of the 
Social Union was held at the chapel 
Saturday evening. The artist was 
Miss Theodora Ursula Irvine of New 
York City, a talented impersonator and 
teller of stories. 

Miss Irvine entertained her audience 
with a collection of stories and poems, 
all of which were enthusiastically ap- 
plauded. All of the selections were 
taken from recent American fiction 
and were well calculated to please any 
audience. 

The first selection was an intensely 
interesting story of Newspaper Row 
in New York, a story of a reporter 
who was an absent-minded genius, 
and how he unconsciously scored a 



r\\ 



Iiie Worthy. 



FRANK Wl BI1ER, Mgr. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Amherst Corner In Kathskellar. 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



OF . 



iioars S Cioatt 



TOBACCO 



A T 



"beat" for the paper from whose 
staff he had just been discharged on 
account of his absent-mindedness. 
For an encore, M'ss Irwin read a short 
and amusing poem on the Italian-Eng- 
lish dialect. 

For a terse and illuminating mode 
of expression, slang has no equal. 
Miss Irvine certainly impressed this 
fact on her audience when she gave 
O. Henry's story of the reconciliation 
of two estranged lovers, with a Bow- 
ery boy as a go-between. The boy's 
picturesque language was reproduced 
to perfection. It had a rather familiar 
sound. 

The selection that followed the en- 
core was a scene from "The Rejuve- 
nation of Aunt Mary "by Anne War- 
ner. Miss Irvine's interpretation of 
Aunt Mary's experiences in New 
York must have unfolded a new pict- 
ure of the scene for those who had 
read the book. The evening's enter- 
tainment was closed with a short anec- 
dote, the tone of which was probably 
well-known by every one in the audi- 
ence. 

The committee In charge of the en- 
tertainments is to be congratulated on 
its choice and it is to be hoped that 
the future entertainment will con- 
tinue to advertise their good judgment. 



ALUMNI PRIZE WINNERS AT 
NEW ENGLAND CORN SHOW 

The alumni of the college were 
much in evidence at the recent New 
England corn show at Worcester 
especially in the Massachusetts classes. 
In the list of prize winners the follow- 
ing are recognized. 

Sweepstakes white dent, 10 ear 
exhibit, winner of the Kellogg Corn- 
flake Company's prize of $200, and of 
the Coe-Mortimer Company prize for 
this class, Erwin S. Fulton, '04. 

Sweepstakes 10 stalk exhibit sweet 
corn, E. &. H. Ward Moore. The 
junior members of this firm is a grad- 
uate of the class of 1896. 

Sweepstakes, 10 ear exhibit flint 
corn, and winner of Hubbard Fertilizer 
Company Drize, Geo. F. Taylor, Jr., 
'92. 

Second prize, best yield flint corn, 
Perley E. Davis, '94. 

In the prize winners of the South 
Central zone; yellow dent, first, M. 
H. Williams '92 ; white dent, 1st E. 
|S. Fulton '04; 2n \ M.M.Browne 
ex- '08, 3rd H. Ward Moore, '95; 
Flint, other than white or yellow, Geo, 
E. Taylor '92; sweet corn 1st M. M. 
Browne '08. 

In addition to the above, Dr. Wil- 
liams '92 took in other classes two 
first and one third; H. W. Moore '96, 
six firsts, four seconds, and two thirds ; 
Perley E. Davis, '94, one first and 
two seconds : Geo. E. Taylor '92 one 
second: and E. S. Fulton '04, one 
second. 



Sanderson 
i a & Thompson. 




The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 



We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 



c 

<#! BEST OUTFITTING 

■&"»?*the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 



Sanderson 



& Thompson, 



Clothiers, 

Hatters, 

Tailors. 



C&rpfrvter & Morehous?, 

PRINTET 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Established 




1851 



r» ».r 




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Eimer & Amend 



205-211 Third Ave., Cor. 1 8th St. 



New York 



Headquarters Foi 



Chemicals, Chemical, Physical, Bacteriological 
Apparatus and Assay Goods 

We carry the largest stock of Laboratory Supplies in the U. S. 

PROMPT SERVICE 



The College Drug Store 



Sprackling '12, All American quar- 
ter-back for this year, will lead Brown 
next season. 



Our European connections are such that we are enabled to offer you 
the best service for duty-free importations on scientific supplies at the 
lowest prices. 






The College Signal, Tuesday, December 6, 1910. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 6, 19 10. 




SOM E of the College Professors are kick- 
ing at the foot-ball business. If they 
only kick hard enough they can raise 
the standard and lower the death rate. 

We'll agree to make it hot for the spectators 
by supplying good warm clothing. 

Suits, overcoats and everything for men 
and boys to wear. 
Sweaters for the Rirls. as well as for the 

Better to take an overcoat than to take 
a cold. , .. 

You can take one of our very taking top 
coats for f m. If you take a cold it may 
cost you a lot more. 



NEW YORK BANQUET 

[Continued from first page] 



COOLEY BROS. 



Westfield, 



Mass. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



H. W. FIELD 

... FLORIST ... 



M. D. OILMAN. C. A. MOFKET. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealer* 

IN 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 311 Maim Street. 

Worcester, Mass. 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



OPP. ACADEMY OF MUSIC, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 




COX SONS 



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VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



CAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



better country life, thus securing more 
friends by this mode of service. 

Some of the present problems 
connected with the college are the 
housing of the students, the fraternity 
houses, the athletic field and scholar- 
ship standards. To provide dormi- 
tories costs on the average $ 1 000 per 
student for erection and a scheme has 
been worked out whereby dormitories 
of a bungalow type may be secured at 
a cost of $300 per student. Again 
there is a great need for an agricul- 
ture and a chemical building. The 
demands upon college men are In- 
creasing so there is a problem of rais- 
ing the standards of scholarship. 

As an agricultural college has for its 
primary object the distribution of 
agricultural knowledge, it has gained 
a prestige from agriculture and the 
possibilities of service to the common- 
wealth economically and socially are 
good. 

George B. Cortelyou was then intro- 
duced, and declared that the work of 
M. A. C. and its alumni was not 
unknown to him, for agriculture is 
coming to the front. The subject for 
his short talk was Agriculture in Cor- 
porations. He said that the farmer 
is taking a distinct part in the govern- 
ment, for he is coming into popular 
intelligence and is realizing that his 
business must be carried on on com- 
mon, reliable principles. Corporations 
now feel that integrity must be sown 
to reap good results. It is to be hoped 
that the farmer will realize the import- 
ance of his calling and that corpora- 
tions may sustain their duty to promote 
wholesome living. 

Pres. Daniel Willard spoke of his 
brief stay at M. A. C, his memories 
of Colonel Clark, Dr. Goessmann and 
military drill. In talking of agricul- 
ture and the railways he mentioned 
the crop reports, which interest eco- 
nomically corporations and railways. 
In America thirteen bushels of wheat 
per acre are produced while twenty- 
eight are produced in Germany under 
inferior conditions. The work of the 
agricultural colleges is to develop 
better methods of producing food in 
proportion to the increasing population 
and to develop a source of exports. 
Railroad interest In agriculture is truly 
national. 

Dr. Chandler and Dr. Ayers then 
gave short talks. Dr. Chandler espec- 
ially emphasized the value of class 
friendships and Dr. Ayers spoke of the 
M. A. C. Alumni Secretaries Associ- 
ation. Its objects are to promote 
alumni interest, to procure a list of all 
alumni and non-graduates, to edit the 
Index alumni list, and to maintain a 
permanent bureau for alumni. 

Trustees Ellis and Gleason were 
called on for remarks and then Captain 
George C. Martin, who spoke of the 
trophies secured by the rifle teams. 
W. P. Brooks spoke concerning the 
experiment station work and M. F. 
Dickinson said a few words upon the 
value of agricultural education. 




m£l 



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A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
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bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3. 50, $400, $5. 00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



Clapp, '12. 



Beers, '12. 



We have a full line of Banners, I'ost 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



j«E. N. PARISEAU,j« 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



RAZORS HONED 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mau. 

M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



ASSEMBLY 

[Continued from first pace- 1 

islands. Further inland, hamlets are 
the largest communities and the peo- 
ple and country are as wild as when 
Magellan visted it. 

The nills-man is a man of simple 
tastes,* who lives in a small hut and 
who can easily change his residence. 
He likes guerilla warfare, has plenty 
of self-reliance, yet obeys superiors, 
and has implicit faith in leader. 

Their chief vice is gambling, but 
they are temperate and not licentious. 
Ninety per cent, ot the people are 
densely ignorant. Few can tell time, 
the day of the week, the month or the 
year. The other ten per cent, are 
fairly well educated, but have had no 
experience in governing themselves. 
Under such conditions the independ- 
ence of the Fiiipino could only be 
extremely detrimental. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

ZOOLOGY AND GEOLOGY. 

The Zoological Department has 
received its second consignment of 
bird skins from Colonel Thayer of 
Lancaster. 

The Zoological Journal club met 
last Friday afternoon. Short papers 
wer? presented by Messrs. McLaine, 
McGarr and Ackerman. 

A Geology Journal Club has been 
organized in connection with field work 
carried on by students in field Geology. 

Current periodicals in Zoology and 
Geology are now accessible on the 
shelves of the department In the new 
building. 



VESPERS. 

[Continued from page 1 1 



Neither acres, banks nor business 
makes great countries, but its tradi- 
tions, and the stern requirements of 
its high ideals. Jesus spent his early 
life as a carpenter, then in the prime 
of life he gave himself up to the work 
of his Imagination for three years. His 
neighbors thought him to be foolishly 
surrendering a good trade in order to 
take up the futile chase of a rainbow. 

No one to-day possesses a fragment 
of the young carpenter's handiwork, 
nor would it be of any great practical 
value to have possession of all of it, 
but the world could ill afford to lose the 
record, the example and the salvation 
of His ministry on earth. 

One of the greatest qualities repre- 
sented in this character-rainbow is that 
of reverence, but the soul cannot 
from Its own fuel keep this quality 
continually alive. One must hold 
himself in communion with the Source 
of great thoughts, high ideals and 
noble achievement. 



JUNIOR LANDSCAPE CLUB 

At the meeting of the Junior Land- 
scape club last Tuesday evening John 
Noyes '09 gave a very interesting talk 
on his travels through the west and 
southwest this last summer. At the 
meeting this week Thursday evening, 
Professor Waugh will speak. This 
club is open to all Juniors electing 
Landscape and it is hoped that they 
will take advantage of their opportunity. 
At the meeting before Thanksgiving 
recess S. F. Hamblin was elected 
president and E. H. Bodfish 
secretary. Also an executive com- 
mittee, consisting of A. F. Muller, F. 
A. Castle and S. Williams, were 
appointed by the president. This 
committee Intends to get such men as 
Warren H. Manning of Boston. State 
Forester Rane and ofher men promi- 
nent in landscape and forestry work to 
address the meetings. 



Phillips Hammond ex-' 1 1 is visiting 
around college for a few days. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

The Pacific Coast Alumni associa- 
tion of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
college will hold its Second Annual 
Meeting and Banquet at the Bismark. 
San Francisco. Cal., Dec. 30, 1910. 
Dr. James B. Paige '82, Dean of the 
college will represent the faculty at ihe 
gathering. All alumni in the Western 
states are invited to be present. 
Those intending to be present should 
communicate with T. F. Hunt, Uni- 
versity of California. Berkeley, Cal. or 
R. L. Adams. Director of the Sprec- 
kels Sugar Company Experiment 
Station, Spreckels, Cal. 

The following alumni have visited 
college recently : Daniel '08. Allen 
and Hazen MO and Hammond ex-'l 1 . 
Among ihe prize-winners at the 
recent Corn show held in Worcester 
the following alumni were noticed : 
G. P. Smith 79. M. H. Williams and 
G. E. Taylor, Jr. '92. P. E. Davis 
'94, E. R. Fulton '04, S. L. Daven- 
port '08 and M. M. Browne ex- '08. 
Davis received first prize of $500 for 
growing the largest amount of crib dry 
shelled corn to the acre. The follow- 
ing is an editorial from the Rural New- 
Yorker- 

"In speaking of the Naw England 
Corn show on page 1 109. we say that 
Mr. Davis, the young man who won 
the first prize for growing over 103 
bushels of crib-dry shelled corn on an 
acre, has done more of real service to 
Massachusetts than any Governor of 
that Commonwealth who has held 
office since Civil the War. We repeat 
that statement deliberately here. 
Most of the gentlemen who have pre- 
sided at the State House will agree 
that law's limitations make the Gov- 
ernor very much of a figurehead. 
The most that he can do is to execute 
the will of the Legislature, or refuse 
to do so. Mr. Davis has shown how 
Massachusetts can provide more of her 
own bread, how waste land can be 
made productive, how farms can be 
doubled in value, and how in conse- 
quence a revised edition of the old- 
time farm life can be made possible. 
Such a man on his farm makes his- 
tory in a way that no Governor can 
match by his work in the State House. 
There were a dozen other prize win- 



SOMETHING MORE THAN FIGURES 

AN A IIS TRACT FROM A l'KRSONAL LETTER 

"What ;i grand time we had at the Coin Show ! It was both 
enjoyable and instructive. In offering prists, as you did, you 
have greatly increased tin- Interest in corn growing, and thus 

largely advanced New England Agiiculture. I hope you will be 
able to keep right on doing so. And, after you have faithfully 
served your generation, antl dropped asleep with the fathers, M 
farmers will adorn your casket with piize tars of corn, which will 
not be out of place in the golden streets ot the New Jerusalem. 

To taise a maximum crop of com, 1 think one should have 
Bowker'l fertilizer, a loam soil, a hcav\ . lovei sod, thoroughbred 
seed, a love for the business and perseverance enough to last till 
frost comes." I,. W. PEET, MlDDLSKJRY, Ykkmont. 

We quote the above letter because we think it shows that there 
is something more than laboratory figures in the fertilizer business 

" Study the f>l,int food problem. " 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



I. OT. LABROVITZ 

THE 

Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits and Overcoats To Order 
Always a large and select line of Foreign and Domestic Woolens. 

Dyeing, Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing a Specialty 

A guaranteed fit in all the latest kinds of garments. 

Renovated Suits For Sale. 

A first-class line of dent's Furnishing Coods always on hand. E. It W. 

Collars and Dress Shirts. Satisfaction guaranteed in every transaction 



1 1 Amity Street, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Tel. 302-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS P/A/S 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

Class Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and Class 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 
I»H()TOC,WAVUHE» 

WORKS, 17th STREET A LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 6, 1910. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 




AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



^><Y>>>CyWJV>W^^ 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



STEAM PITTING, Telephone 59— 4. 

GAS FITTINU, TINNING 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 

FOR FARMS ! 

Big. Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinitv, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 
Savings Bank BPk, 

Amherst, - Mass. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



J. H. TROTT 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



E. B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Disrvavvi^ rooms 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 
IMolUA. M. !.:*<> to A I=». IVI. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



Olvmpia Candv Co. 

257 Main St., 
Northampton, - - Mass. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



ners at this show of whom much the 
same can be said. And we would 
like to add the name of our old friend 
William H. Bowker, who for years has 
acted the part of a good citizen, and 
has been with the front rank of agri- 
cultural development." 

'82. — S. C. Damon had charge of 
the exhibit made by the Rhode Island 
Experiment Station at the New Eng- 
land Corn Show. 

'83. — Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Minot 
i celabrated their 25th wedding anni- 
versary recentlyat their home in West- 
minister. 

'94. — P. E. Davis of Granby has 
won the world's record and a prize of 
$500 at Worcester for the best yield 
of 127 bushels of shelled corn on one 
acre. 

'95.— R. A. Cooiey, State Ento 
mologist of Montana has been operated 
on for appendicitis and is now fast 
recovering. 

'96. — William L. Pentecost, Super- 
intendent Gassland Farms.Chapinville, 
Conn. Mr. Pentecost has made a 
specialty of the case and breeding of 
thorough bred stock since leaving col- 
lege and at present has charge of one 
of the finest herds of Guernsey* cattle 
in the country. He also has under his 
charge a farm of 1200 acres. 

'96. — A. B. Cook, Superintendent 
of an estate at Farmington, Conn. 
Mr. Cook also finds time to be con- 
nected wi;h a number of Agricultural 
org-miziti jus whicn is bringing him t 
the fro: t in Agricultural circles in the 
state. He is Master of the Farming- 
ton Grange, Deputy of the Pomona 
Grange, President of the Connecticut 
Sheep Breeders Association, has served 
on various committees of the Connect- 
icut Pomol gi :al Society. A charter 
member and has held offices in the 
Farm Superintendents club and is 
d^ing Farmers Institute work in various 
parts of the state. 

'96. --James L. Marshall and wife 
are receiv.ng congratulations upon the 
arrival cf a son James Laird, Jr*., 
born Oct. 27. This is their third 
child. Mr. Marshall has recently 
been appointed to the very important 
position o f purchasing agent for the 
newly organized firm of Osgood Brad- 
ley Car company, Worcester. He 
has been with the old company since 
leaving college. 

'96. — A. S. Kinney, Instructor of 
Botany and Director of the Dwight 
! Botanical Gardens, Mount Holyoke 
! college, South Hadiey. Mr. Kinney 
is secre*ary of the class and is very 
anxious to hear from every '96 man 
before June, 1911 at which time the 
class has its next reunion. 

'96. — H. Ward Moore, 28 Amherst 
St., Worcester. Mr. Mcore is in the 
market gardening business with his 
father and is doing some developing of 
properties in which he is interested. 
He is auditor of the Worcester Horti- 
cultural society and of the Worcester 
County Agricultural society in both 



AMHERST HOUSE 

BARBER 
SH0P-t» 



The SHOP THAT LEADS 



ALSO 



AGGIE SHOP 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



Wright 
& Ditson 

Football and Basketball suits 
the standard at all leading 
colleges. The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
( itiards the best and most pract- 
ical, also Skates and Hockey 
Goods: The Wright & Dit- 
JL son Sweaters have 
^/'Vi: long been recognized 
as the best. 

College Students and Athletes 

i^kS*- who want the real, superior 

«■«. <^ articles for the different sports 

u. *. pat or, should get the kind that bear 

our trade-mark. Catalogue free. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

22 Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

76 WVybosset Street, Providence, R. I. 

Harvard Square, Cambridge. Mass. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. W. Hlaney, 'ii, 
C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, K. L. Winn, 87 
Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursdays, 
Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 6, 1910. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic HIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only Jrom 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Great River Water Power Co. 

E. A. 6r» S. A. ALLEN, /'n>p s . 
Office, Gillett Block. 

WESTFIED, MASS. 



ROOMS WITH HEAT, 
POWER <£ LIGHT 

FOR RENT 



BALED SHAVINGS 

put up in attractive shape, 

in car lots. 

PRICE ON APPLICATION 

FRANK S. O'BRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND MACK 



societies being a very active member. 
He is also secretary of the Tatnuck 
Farmers' club and has been a notary 
public of the city of Worcester for ten 
years. 

'96.— Charles A Nutting has moved 
from Ashby to West Berlin. 

Ex- '96. — J. Elton Green, in charge 
of county department of the real estate 
firm of Baldwin & Howell, 318-324 
Kearney St., San Francisco, Cal. 

'99. — A son, Allen Edwards, was 
born on Oct. 6, to W. A. Hooker of 
Washington, D. C. 

"99.— Herbert W. Dana, until 
recently advertising manager for R. 
H. White & Company of Boston, has 
accepted a similar position with R. H. 
Macy &. Company of New York City. 
He will reside in East Orange, N.J. 

'04.— F. D. Couden of Seattle. 
Wash., has recently been appointed 
county deputy. Mr. Couden moved 
to Seattle about a year ago. He is a 
member of the law firm of Myers in I 
Couden with offices in Alaska Building. 
'04. — W. E. Tottingham is a joint 
author with Prof. E. B. Hart of Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin of "General 
Agricultural Chemistry," published in 
1910. 

'08. — H. M. Jennison expects to 
attend the meeting of the American 
Association for Advanced Science to 
be called at Minneapolis during the 
Christmas holidays. 

'09.— H. E. Cutier, Head of the 
Department of Agriculture, Manual 
Training and Domestic Science in the 
Texarkana Public Schools, Texarkana, 
Texas. 

'10. — R. P. Armstrong was around 
college last week. 

'10. — L. S. Dickinson, Surveyor 
and Landscape Gardener, Amherst. 

•|0. — R. E. Annis is with the Sig- 
nal Department of N. Y. C. & H. R. 
R. R. as a draughtsman. Address, 
33 West 129th St., New York. 

'10. — H. A. Brooks has returned 
to work for the B. & O. R R. after 
six weeks' sickness. Address 1915 
St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md., £ Dr. 
Douglass. 

•10.— W. M. S. Titus had charge 
of the German Kali Exhibit at the 
Worcester Corn Show. 

Ex- 10.— C. W. Stockwell has 
recently taken a position with the 
United States Department of Agricul- 
ture, Bureau of Entomology and will 
spend the winter in Washington, D. C. 
Ex-'ll.— R. A, Denslow is secre- 
tary of the Y. M. C. A. at the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. Wisconsin has 
the fourth largest Y. M. C. A. among 
the American universities and colleges. 
Ex-'12.— J. T. Finnegan, 126 Wall 
St., New Haven, Conn. 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 



8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, - - MASS. 

Telephone 













FATIMA 



:■;.'•;.■ 





i 



With each package of 
I all ma i.ou get a ptn- 
nant coupon, 25 of 
which secure a hanJ- 
snm l f '/ colleg' pen- 
n.ml (1 2x32) — teitc- 
tion of 100. 



i 



TURKISH 

BLEND 

CIGARETTES 



BOTANY 



Of all plants that grow, 
tobacco gives the greatest 
pleasure to man 

Fatimas are made of rare 
tobaccos skillfully blended 
to give a "different*' taste, 
as delicate as a flavor. 

College men say they're 
a *' Daisy*' cigarette — and 
college men know. 

The package is not pre- 
tentious but the cigarelte is 
excellent and you get ten 
additional, 20 Lr 1 5 cents. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 






I I . , »■, . , , , , . . !.. ■■! i . n^. r i. i v-. * -'. ' ^ ' ' ? ■• ,r.-, v." 1 ■■■"- ■■•■ ' ■ " ■"- ' .■•. ' ■ . ' .-. ; ■ "'' ■•■.•. J 

1, 1 .. ' ■ I . 1 I .11 ■■! . .1 .. ■■ .i.l ■■ ■ -ii. I Ml ■ ■ ■ ■ ' ■ ■■ 



5w- 

-— 




THE Ii. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



STAMFORD, CONN. 



There Is As Much Difference Between 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

And many other so-called "Hasic Slags" as there is between a high-grade 

mixed fertilizer and a poor one. 

Professors Maertker and Wagner have experimented with sixteen 
different makes of Hasic Slags, and find that they vary in effect on growing 
(Tops from eighteen to one hundred per cent. 

The Total Phosphoric Acid may appear all tight in a doubtful Hasic 
Slag, but remember it is Available Phosphoric Acid that you are seeking. 

We are Sole Agents for the Atlantic Seaboard for the Largest 
Producers in the World of 

Genuine Thomas Phosphate Powder 

(Basic Slag Phosphate) 

Manufactured by the improved German Method, and guaranteed of 
High Availability. 

It is, as you know, the best source of Phosphoric Acid and Lime, 
especially for Fruits, Legumes, Grass and Cereals. 

Special Literature free if you mention the College Signal. 

THE! COEl-MORTHVIEIR OO. 

SPECIAL IMPORTERS 

Sole Manufacturers of E. Frank Coe Fertilizers and Peruvian Brands 

24-26 Stone St. New York City 



Football is in danger at Tufts col- 
lege. The great fall game may be 
dropped from the list of varsity sports 
at the next meeting of the athletic 
advisory board, which will be held 
within a week. 



JOHN WOJTASZCZYK BASSALO TTI & GENTASO 



Boot & Shoes Repaired 

FIRST CLASS WORK 

Amherst, - Mass. 



FRUIT, 

CONFECTIONERY, 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

BRICKS TO TAKK MOMK. 

CORNER AMITY & 1'LEASANT STREETS 



1,1 ]'.;■: A 






The College Signal, Tuesday, December 6, 1910. 



Pi. J. mm. inc. 



Proprietors of 



HU TO— LIVEBY-HOBSE 



Tel. 183. 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

WTci tA 'c 57 ~ 63 Franklin Street, 
TT dlU 3 BOSTON. 



ALL OF THE 

VARSITY MEN 

and most of the upserclassmen 
wear 

HAND KNIT 

Shaker Sweaters 

"THERE IS A REASON." 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Has started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 

FORESTRY, 



Allen Bros. 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course .sopen to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford a splendid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

Kknyon L. Buiterfield, President. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



EDWARD l_. HAZEN, '14 



AGENT FOR 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

N neteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society, 

Debating Council, 



Herbert W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

Leon E. Fagerstrom, Jr., Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis. President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill. President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

John E. Dudley, Jr., President 

Raymond C. Barrows, President 

Irving C. Gilgore, President 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



AT M. A. C 



BOYDEN'S 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Restaurant and Bakery U^IPOR 7V\ S 



Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Amherst, Mass. 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 






AMHERST. MASS. 

COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



CARS 



Leave AQUIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AGGIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Car* at Reasonable Rate* 



AMHERST & SUN8E8LAND ST. RY. CO 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page.. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, %2. Weekly, $1. 



THE COLLEGE 






Vol. XXI. \^^ 
HtvKEY 



>* ^ACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 13. 1910. 

SUNDAY VESPERS 




EC 1 ti 1910 
tallage 



ASSEMBLY 



First Game of the Season a Success. 

Team Work Brings a 6-3 

Victory. 

Williams college was defeated 6 to 
3, by the Massachusetts agricultural 
college hockey team, at Williamstown 
in the first match of the season. The 
game was the first on William's new 
rink at Weston field, and drew the 
largest attendance that has ever been 
seen at a Williams hockey game. 

We had the better of the game from 
the beginning, due to well developed 
team play and also brilliant individual 
work. Jones. Sanctuary, and Hutch- 
inson were the stars of the game, each 
shooting two goals, and but for the 
remarkable work of G. Curtis at goal 
our score would have been much 
larger. Jones and Hutchinson were 
especially clever at handling the puck 
and in goal shooting. The work of 
Needham at cover point was also a 
feature. 

Williams played well at times but 
lacked consistency and team work. 
Capt. Van Gorder was easily their best 
man. Massachusetts forced the play 
into Williams territory and had them 
on the defense all through the game. 
Massachusetts scored four times in the 
first period and twice in the second, 
while Williams tallied once in the first 
and twice in the second. The 
line-up: — 

MASSACHUSETTS. WILLIAMS. 

Ackerman, g g. G. Curtis 

Adams, p P. Peterson 

Needham, cp cp, Michaels 

Hutchinson, c c, Van Gorder 

Jones, r r, Dewey. Hubbell, Gillette 

Sanctuary, lw lw. Field 

Peckham, rw rw, Olcott. Curtis 

Score— Massachusetts 6. Williams 3. 
Goals— Jones 2, Sanctuary 2, Hutchinson 
2. Van Gorder 2, Olcott. Referee— Stevens 
of Williams. Time. 15 and 20-minuta 
halves. 



EDITOR'S NOTICE 

Members of the Signal editorial 
staff who plan to secure credit in jour- 
nalism upon their Signal work, will j 
fot this semester read Glvens: The 
Making of a Newspaper, chapters I- 
XIV, XVII. m The examination will be 
given on Wednesday, Jan. 15, lit 

9 A. M. 



A first edition of forty-thousand 
pamphlets entitled "Golden New 
England" has been issued. This 
instructive bulletin prepared for Bos- 
ton bankers by Mr. Sylvester Baxter 
contains much information concerning 
the work of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college j farming specials, dem- 
onstrative orchards, farmers' weeks etc. 
Photographic cuts of the president 
and interior of two of the farming 
special cars are used. 



Field Secretary Kimball of the Mass- 
achusetts Savings Bank Life In- 
surance League Speaks. 

The speaker at the Wednesday As- 
sembly was Mr. Harry Kimball of Bos- 
ton, Field Secretary of the Massa- 
chusetts Savings Bank Life Insurance 
League. Speaking of the work and 
purpose of the League, Mr. Kimball 
said in part 

Do you realize that there is a right 
time to die? There is a moment for 
a man in his career, when the world 
would be better off without him, and 
he would be better off without the 
world. This moment comes at the 
point when he has no one dependent 
upon him, and is unable to care tor 
himself. It Is, however, an unfor- 
tunate fact that most people do 
not die at the right time ; they die 
either to late or too soon. It is sound, 
common sense to provide for these 
contingencies. A man does this, first, 
by life insurance ; second by adequate 
savings; third, by buying for himself 
at an early period of his life, an old 
age annuity or pension. 

Life insurance is not insurance of 
life, it is not protection against death. 
It simply protects the values invested 
in a man's life; it insures his abilities 
and capital against loss. 

Since life insurance has become a 
necessity, the wage-earning people 
have been quick to recognize it. More 
of them Insure than do the business 
men. Many industrial insurance com- 
panies have sprung up, and in Massa- 
chusetts three such companies collect- 
ed $8,000,000 in premiums from the 
working people. The largest policy 
held by any one person did not 
execeed five hundred dollars. 

Three years ago, working men paid 
double for insurance what business men 
did. There were also restrictions on the 
polices; for instance, there was a time 
limit regarding payment of policy. If a 
policy-holder died within a certain time, 
his heirs were paid only a part of the pol- 
icy. The result was, that the working 
people were obliged to pay twice as 
much for protection as the business 
man. Abraham Lincoln was once riding 
horse-back with a friend when suddenly 
he stopped, dismounted and turned 
over a bug which was lying on its back 
in the road and struggling unsuccess- 
fully to get right side up again. When 
the friend showed his surprise, Mr. 
Lincold said, "I simply wanted to give 
him a chance with the other bugs." 
These words express the fundamental 
idea of democracy. But the people 
who need this equality the most do not 



Rev. Thomas Van Ness Addresses Stu- 



dents on 



Beliefs That Are 
Worth While". 



At the Vesper service held Sunday 
afternoon in the chapel, Rev. Thomas 
Van Ness of Boston, gave an interest- 
ing address on "Beliefs That are 
Worth While." The text was : "As 
many as are read by the spirit of God. 
they are sons are God. " The address 
was in part : 

This is a practical age, an age in 
which men ask why for everything. 
No new theory or scientific principle is 
announced, but what the world asks 
"why." In the same way. the church 
is being tested. Are its beliefs worth 
while ? Is the church of practical 
value to all sorts and conditions of 
life ? Yes, I believe it has. 

The first belief that is worth while, 
is the belief that this is a progressive 
world. The doctrine of evolution 
shows a continuous forward movement, 
new ideas and new lines of thought are 
being evolved. This is not a static 
world but a dynamic world. The 
beliefs today are different from those 
of other years, Our fathers believed 
that one must turn to the deeds and 
literature of the old world for inspira- 
tions and ideas. The practical result 
was that attention was drawn away 
from the future to the past. The 
study of old Greek and Hebrew manu- 
scripts was fostered. The new view 
of progressiveness is summed up in the 
words of Emerson when he said, "You 
tell me that God spoke to Moses in a 
burning bush. I know that God 
speaks to us from every blooming rose- 
bush. " The old theory that the 
Lord's hand cannot be traced in the 
deeds of the present, still prevails to 
some extent. If God is omnipresent, 
he is our guide now, just as much as 
before. God is on the earth. He is in 
us as well as in the heavens, He is 
still speaking and revelations are still 
revealed. The progressive belief is 
practical; it gives us hope and cheer. 
We live in a world that is stilt in the 
creating. If conditions are depressing 
I say, wait; this is not a perfoct world 
because it is a progressive world. 
Because it is so, men are continually 
progressing, coming up in life. 

The second belief is that the world 
is an understandable world. To be 
truly understandable, the world must 
be orderly in every form. Movements 
must be actuated by something besides 
whim or caprice. It is the creators 
wish that men should understand the 
works of God, because if we cannot 
understand, how can we say that His 



No. 12 
ANNUAL RECEPTION 

Ladies of the Faculty Entertain Student 
Body in Drill Hall. 

Last Friday evening the annual 
reception tendered by the ladies of the 
faculty to the student body, was held in 
the Drill Hall. The hall was very 
attractively trimmed with flags and 
streamers in the college colors. On 
one side of the hall was a large M. A. 
C. and at one end a large M. made 
by maroon colored lights. At the end 
and along the sides were arranged 
tables, lighted by maroon colored can- 
dles, from which ice-cream and cake 
was served by the ladies. 

In the course of the evening three 
scenes from Shakespeare's "Much 
Ado about Nothing" were presented 
by Professor McKay and troupe. 
Following this several selections were 
rendered by a quartet composed of 
Walker. Cobb, French and Pease. 

The student body owes a debt of 
gratitude to Mrs. Hasbrouck and the 
other ladles of the faculty who worked 
untiringly to make the evening most 
enjoyable. Tnat their efforts were 
appreciated was shown by the fact that 
the largest assembly in the history of 
the function was present. 

Tnose who were on the reception 
committee were Mrs. Butterfleld, 
Mrs. Hurd, Mrs. Robinson, Mrs. 
Norman, Mrs. Chamberlain, and Mrs. 
Duncan As assistants, the following 
acted as ushers: from the class of 1911. 
Bursley, Blaney, Howe, Pickard and 
Wiliard; from 1912, Beers. Wales, 
Pratt, S. Williams, and Madison ; from 

1913, Griggs, Larson and Ellis; from 

1914, Edwards, Dearing, Palmer, 
Damon and Gibson. 



[Continued on p»e« 4 1 



(Continued on pee* 4.] 



CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped In the 
Signal Office or funded to E. M. Brown 1 1 . on or 
before the Saturday precedlnf each iMue. J 

Dec. 13—6-45 p. m., Stockbridge 
club in Agricultural Recitaticn 
Room. 

7-00 p.m., Glee Club rehearsal 
in Chapel. 

rj eCi 14 — 3-30 p. M. , Student Mass 
meeting. 

7-00 p. M., Debating club in 
Public Speaking Room. 
7-00 p. M., Mandolin club 
rehearsal in Chapei. 
7-30 p. m., Junior Land- 
scape club in Wilder Hall, Pro- 
fessor Waugh. 

Dec. 15—6 45 p. *., Y. M. C. A. in 
Chapel. 

D ec# i6 — 6-00 p. m., College closes 
for Christmas vacation. 

Jan. 2— 1-00 p.m., Chapel, opening 
of college after winter recess. 



I 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 13, 1910. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, Editor-in-Chief. 

HAROLD F. W1LLARD. 1911, Managing Editor. 
IRVING W. DAVIS. 1911. Alumni Notes. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY. 1911. Competition EHitor. 
ROYALN.HALLOWELL.I9I2, Assistant Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912 College Notes. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Department Notes. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALLEN 1911. Business Manager. 

ALBERT W.DODGE 1912 Asst. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen 



Entered u second-c'as» matter at the Amherst 
Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, DEC 13. No 12. 



The Signal wishes to congratulate 
the hockey team for the exceptional 
showing against Williams last Satur- 
day. To defeat a strong college ag 
gregation in our opening game is very 
commendable but the combination of 
players is one which will show marked 
strength against other teams and noth- 
ing short of a very successful season is 
looked for. 



While the work of the college has 
recently had a marked tendency 
toward rur*l betterment, the work of 
the past week under the supervision of 
the Y. M. C. A. has been individual 
betterment. Mr. Pontius and Mr. 
King in their daily addresses and in- 
dividual conferences have influenced 
many men. Tneir efforts have bene- 
fitted the college atmosphere by creat- 
ing a desire in many to act manlier 
and to live closer to the Ideal. 



fairly, and absence from such college 
affairs as Y. M. C. A., class, or mass 
meetings clearly shows the attitude of 
non-responsioility 

Do you think because you are not a 
senior or an officer in an organization 
that you have no part in those func- 
tions or no duties to perform? The 
situation calls for only average en- 
deavor from an average student. 
Assume a proper amount of" responsi- 
bility; do not make it a question for 
others; perform your part, and these 
objectionable affairs will not arise. 



A matter which has come before 
our attention forcefully is that of the 
removing of the lights from the locker 
room in the drill hall. In the first 
place, the college is not a public dis- 
pensary of commodities for students' 
needs and by appropriating these eiec- 



An editorial appearing in tne col- 
umns of a recent Amherst Record 
gives a view of the effect which the 
present Legislature may have on the 
college appropriations from the com- 
monwealth. 

"Since election-day some persons 
have been wondering as to whether 
the election of a democratic governor, 
and a large increase in the democratic 
representation in the Massachusetts 
Legislature, would have any effect on 
the amount of the state appropriation 
for the Agricultural college. It cer- 
tainly ought not to and we don't 
believe it will. The college is a state 
institution, and as such has absolutely 
nothing to do with politics. None of 
the members of its faculty take any 
active part in politics and what they do 
as individuals has no possible relation 
to their college duties. We recognize 
the fact that in tne campaign just 
ended the democrats charged the 
republican administration with extrav- 
agance in state expenditures and 
declared that a democratic adminis- 
tration would reduce these expendi- 
tures materially. Wnile appropria- 
tions have shown a large increase in 
recent years this does not of itself 
prove extravagance. The question is 
were the appropriations necessary and 
did the state get value received for the 
money expended. We believe and 
we thi k it is susceptible of easy proof, 
that the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College and Experiment Station are 
among the very best investments the 



UP- TO - DATE 



FOOTWEAR 



PUMPS 

ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 

TENNIS SHOES 

EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



THURBER'S 

COLLEGE LUNCH 

a\ihi;wsi. MASS. 

COTRELL and LEONARD 



TRAVELING 

TOILET SETS 

NEW STYLES 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
ot 



& GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



trie lights the track men are the par- state has invested in these institutions 
ticular sufferers since they use this the more the state and its inhabitants 
room continual y. i have got out of them. They were 

The fellows should show a more never s0 wel1 equipped, never doin 8 
defined sense of ownership and should \ suCn g° od service as the * are tcda y- 
not so inconvenience the students To restrict their usefulness by cutting 
themselves. But tnis matter is only d ^ wn appropriations would be a most 
one of several beginnings which show short-sighted policy, for which we are 
cone the lack of responsibility certain no governor and no Legislature 

which the^average student manifests. wou,d care t0 acce P l ,he responsibility. 

We do not believe a change in state 
administration means any change in j 
the state policy toward the Agricultutal 
• (ge. Any attempt to play politics 
with the college will arouse a protest 
in all parts of the state that will make 
itoelf felt at Boston. 



Shaving Mirrors. 



Removing equipment from the dining- 
hall is a question which vitally con- 
cerns the 

boarders, since the one!: 

must pay for it ; the amount of unre 
turned d ..Iverware and napkins 

is an it' ch raises the price of 

board. Th ' on of it- 

d^n't-make-any-inference is shown at 

decorations dis- 
l m conduct, appro- 
priating or securing information un- 



Representatives from each frater- 
nity were met by Mr. Elliott of thr> 
International Bible society to discuss 
fraternity Bible study. 



DEUEL'S 



Drug Store 



The Prospect House 

Good Hoard and 
Clean, Airy Rooms 

MRS. E. E. PERRY 

There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

O O A L 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 13, 1910 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Go. 



616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 



Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 



SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prizes Trophies 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms. 1 . 



INFORMAL 

The second informal of the year was 
held in the Drill Hall last Saturday 
afternoon. The hall afforded a very 
pleasing picture to the eye, the same 
plan of paneled decoration was carried 
out as at the first informal, and in 
addition there was a large electric 
M. A. C. piece on the west wall that 
added much to the hall's attractiveness. 
Tne Informal committoe may well 
be proud of their work in decorating 
the hall so w-jII and being able to pro- 
cure such fine music; for the dance 
was certainly a success and enjoyed 
by all that went. 

Trie patronesses were : Mrs. Wel- 
lington, Mrs. Duncan, Mrs. Lange of 
Smith college and Miss Eaton of Mt. 
Holyoke college. 

The dance was well attended by the 
three upper classes, but the freshmen 
did not respond very well. Those who 
attended the informal were; 1911 — 
Baker, Brown. Bursely. Hill, Howe, 
Johnson, Larrabee, Piper and Prouty ; 
1912— Brett, Burr, Carpenter, Hal- 
iowell, Philbrick. Souihwick, Tower, 
Wiide, S. Williams and Wood; 1913 
Adams. Anderson, Birdsall, Bradley, 
Bursely. GriRgs. Hayden, Lowry, Pel- 
lett and R-hros; 1914- Bickford, 
Bittirger, H. Brown, Edwards, Care, 
Higgins, Palmer, Tower and Shayier 
others— Adams ex '09, Regan '08 . 
Allen, S. Brooks. Chrk, Dickinson. 
McLaine. Nickless and Thomas '10. 
Lull and S. E. Huse, New Hamp- 
shire. '08, Sibley. 



r\\ 



The Worthy. 

PRANK WEBBER, M..R. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Amherst Corner in Rathskellnr. 



YOU WILL FIND 
A PULL LINE 



679 23 

2,922.89 

459 15 

348.54 

10.766.56 

2.796 00 
3.85 



with the 

x -&"W\ BE 




Sanderson 
k Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 



BEST OUTFITTING 

■■Js-^S^the country produces. 

The Fall Style* are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 

one. 

\\ «• solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 

Hatters, 
Tailors. 



£&rp?rvter St Morehous*, 
PRINTERS, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 




TOBACCO 






OF 



C. R. ELDER 



The College Drug Store 



STATEMENT OF DINING HALL 
FOR FIRST QUARTER 

The auditing of the Dining Hall 
accounts for the quarter beginning 
Sept. 1st and ending Nov. 30th 
showed the following figures : 

Total Provisions Purchased, $1 1 .517.81 

Kitchen and Dining Hall Service. 

Inventory. Sept 1st. 

Inventory. Nov. 30th, 

Transients 

Decrease in value of Equipment, 

Net Cost of Board. 

Total weeks board, 

Rate per wee-'. 

Since the price of board charged 
for this quarter has been $4.20 ard 
the rate per week audits at $3.85, a 
rebate of 35 cents per week will be 
credited to those boarding at the 
Dining Hall at the end of the qua- 
N:v. 30th. This rebate will be cred- ; 
i ited on the bo jks at once and will not 
be paid in cash. 

In accordance w,th the ruling of the 
trustees, the price of board for next 
quarter wul be 5f hifeher than the ' 
' audited price of board for the preced- 
ing quarter or $4.05. 

As shown by tne figures, the Depre- 
ciation of equipment is no mean sum. 
Of course a larger part of this is due 
to the necessary wear and tear but the 
loss of silverware, crock-ry. and linen 
increased the sum rably. This 

^e that the fellows can 



Established 



1851 



Eimer & Amend 



205-211 Third Ave., Cor. 18th St. 



New York 



Hbasquarti M Fob 

Chemicals, Chemical, Physical, Bacteriological 
Apparatus and Assay Goods 

We carry the largest stock of Laboratory Supplies in the U. S. 
I PROMPT SERVICE 



is an o 

avoid th 



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Bring back your | 



Our European tionsare such iT.t you 

, dutyfree importations on scientific supplies .it the 

the best service km uu»j »»* 1 

lowest prices. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 13, 19 10. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 13, 1910. 




In some of our special suits for young 
men we have adapted, not adopted, the 
new London fashion— the coat closer to 
the figure than formerly, smaller sleeves, 
natural shoulders, practically no padding, 
the effect entirely new. 

Men who want totally new ideas in 
dress will find this store the "center rush." 

COOLEY BROTHERS, 

Westfield, Mass. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found ;it 



E WELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



H. W. FIELD 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



OPP. ACADKMV Of MUSIC, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWKR EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



M. D. OILMAN. c A. MOKKKT. 

TELEPHONK 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealer* 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Main Stkkbt. 

Worcester, Mass. 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



CAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



extra cutlery and linen belonging to 
the Dining Hall. 

P. W. Pickard, ) Dining Hall 
E. N. Boland, f Committee. 

SUNDAY VESPERS 

[Continued from first p»te.l 

plans and deeds are beneficent. 

If the universe is one, the question 
is asked, is man something separate. 
Most assuredly no. Within man must 
beat and pulsate all the forces which 
beat and pulsate through all things. 
St. Francis had the idea when he said, 
"I am a brother to the birds, the 
fishes, to all living creatures." We 
share God's creative ability, we are 
God's sons possessing eternal light. 
The great engineering feats of the 
present, the immense progress along 
scientific lines, show that we have 
recognized our creative ability on the 
physical world. 

Lastly we ask where to find those 
laws that governed the spiritual 
world, nineteen hundred years ago? 
Jesus said, "I am the light of the 
world: he that followeth me shall not 
walk in darkness but shall have the 
light of life." He said to his dis- 
ciples: "I believe in these laws, fol- 
low thou me." We say that we 
believe but do we make them the rules 
of our life. When the late Henry 
Edward was a young man he studied 
physics under a noted tutor. They 
were in the laboratory and had just 
finished a study of the laws of heat. 
The tutor asked the young prince if he 
firmly believed all these laws. When 
the prince said that he did, the tutor 
called an attendant and bade him place 
before them a pail of water, and 
another pail containing moulten lead. 
"Now," said the tutor, "if you firmly 
and steadfastly believe in these laws, 
thrust your hand into the lead and 
ladle it into the water. " The prince 
looked at him in surprise and asked if 
he really meant it. Then he put his 
perspiring hand into the lead and ladled 
it into the water. Have we such trust 
in the laws that Jesus has given us ? 
Laws which shall give us peace, 
strength, manhood, and make us sons 
of God. Nineteen hundred years ago 
the command rang out. "Follow 
thou me." Are we willing to follow 
Him ? 



ASSEMBLY 

[Continued from first page] 



get it; they live continually close to 
the edge of poverty. A charity worker 
in Chicago said that three years ago, 
the wage earners paid more for coal 
than all the contributions to benevolent 
organizations in that year. In propor- 
tion to the amount of capital invested 
in tenements, 40^fc to 50^> more was 
paid for them than houses on the 
boulevards. 

In 1907, a law providing for in- 
surance bank deposits, was inacted. 
Two banks have opened departments 
for these deposits, and others are pre- 
pring to. The law provides that a 




GnaTl 



1 



A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 



THE SHOEMAN." 



Tel. 94-4 



Clapp, '12. 



Beers, '12. 



We have a full line of banners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, ',3. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



.s»E. N. PARISEAU,.* 

HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



RAZORS HONED 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



bank must have as a security, a guar- 
anteed fund of $25,000. The state 
itself pays the general admission ex- 
penses. The banks must not expend 
any money in soliciting business. So, 
tor the first time in the history of 
Massachusetts, and of the United 
States, old age annuities have been 
made possible. When the law was 
passed the industrial companies re- 
duced their rates 10^f per cent ; when 
the first bank opened a department, 
they reduced their rates 10^r more. 
This movement has saved money for 
the working people by furnishing in- 
surance cheaper than the industrial 
companies. 

The first death under the law was a 
man who had a $500 policy. He had 
paid $1.95 a month for five months; 
his widow received $500. An indus- 
trial compsny would have paid only 
$192. 

Already agencies have been estab- 
lished in eighty of the leading manu- 
factories in the eastern part of the 
state. The movement is just begin- 
ning in the western part. The estab- 
lishment of these agencies has been 
cordially endorsed by the unions and 
employers. By this movement insur- 
ance is furnished at cost. A man may 
live too long but the chances are that 
the man who tries to save wili not. 
One of the safest things for people is 
this old age pension system. 

Several years ago an old age pen- 
sion plan was established in England 
and Germany. Each system is, how- 
ever, defective ; in Germany the pen- 
sion is compulsory, while in England 
it Is granted to those who can prove 
themselves to be paupers. Here the 
banks issue pension on a plan by which 
a man pays in so much a month. 
After he is sixty years old, he re- 
ceives a pension as long as he lives. 

NEW MEN PLEDGED 

The following men were pledged to 
tne different fraternities last Thurs- 
day morning : 

Kappa Sigma — F. J. Bittinger cf 
Plymouth, H. D. Brown of Lowell, 
R. S. Damon of Kingston, R. I., 
Ralph Melloon of Lowell, L. W. Need- 
ham of Springfeld, F. P. Shaylor of 
Lee. 

Phi Sigma Kappa — Robert Chapon 
of Bangor, Me., L. G. Davies of Pea- 
body. R. N. Demond of Stafford 
Springs, Conn., E. C. Edwards of 
Salem, E. W. Higgins of Arlington, 
J. G. Hutchinson of Arlington, D. M. 
Munroe of Huntington, N. Y., W. 
Nichol of Long Island, N. Y., E. K. 
Parker of Northampton, E. F. Upton 
of Salem. 

Q. T. V. — H. M. Bickfordof East 
Braintree, N. D. Dearing of Boston, 
S. B. Freeborn of Ware, D. W. 
Jones of Melrose, Richard Powers of 
Maiden, and J. P. Sherman of 
Hyannis. 

C. S. C — H. W. Brewer of*Mt. 
Vernon, N. Y., R. T. Frost of Buf- 
falo, N. Y.. W. G. Kilbobrne of South 



Lancaster, Theodore and Tell W. Nic- 
olet of Fall River, Harry Nissen of 
Rosendale.and L.E.Smith of Brighton. 

Theta Phi— G. O. Allbee of Med- 
way, H. L. Eldredge of Wareham, E. 
J. Gare of Northampton, D. W. Gib- 
son of Groton, P. P. Keyes of Am- 
herst, G. W. Simmons of Boston, R. 
C. Taft of Oxford and N. K. Walker 
of Maiden. 

Kappa Gamma Phi--C. Bokelund 
of Worcester, E. W. Christie of North 
Adorns, E. W Earle of Boston, M. 
A. Grebin of North Hadley, H. F. 
Hadfield of North Adams, R. F. ! 
Leete of Mi. Kisco, N. Y., F. W. I 
Read of Boston, R. S. Spencer of 
West Burke, Vt.. G. O. Stewart of 
Somerville, C. W. Whippen of Lynn. 
G. E. Williams of Belchertown and W. 
G. Griffen '13 of South Hadley Falls. 

Sigma Tau Delta — E. S. Clark of 
Windsor, Conn., R. E. Davis of 
Southbury, Conn., R. W. Harris of 
Wethersfield, Leone E. Smith of 
Leominster, C. S. Wheeler of Lowell, 
P. F.Whorf of Boston, J. D. Wing of 
Somerville. 

Beta Kappa Phi— A. W. Brooks of 
New Bedford, W. A. Davis of Sun- 
derland, B. R. Graves of Northamp- 
ton, V. S. Harriman of Brockton, L. 
H. Norton of Brockton and B. A. 
Porter of Amherst. 



SOMETHING MORE THAN FIGURES 

\N ABSTRACT PROM I PERSONAL LETTER 

"What I grand time we had at the Coin Show! It was both 

enjoyable and instructive. In offering prises, as you did, you 
have greatly increased the interest in corn growing, and thus 
large!) adv. meed New England Agriculture. I hope you will i>e 

able tO keep r i«^ht on doing so. And, alter you have faithfully 

served ><»m generation, and dropped asleep with the fathers, we 

fanners will adorn yOttl casket with prize eSTi of min, which will 

not be out of place in the golden streets ol the New ferusstera. 

To iaise a maximum crop of corn, I think one should have 
liowker's fertilizer, a loam sod. ■ heavy clovei sod, thoroughbred 
seed, a love for the business and perseverance enough to last till 
host comes." L. W. PEET, Middlkbukv, Vermont, 

\\ 1 quote the above letter because WC think it shows that there 

is something more than laboratory figures in the fertilizei business 

" Study the pLiiit 'foo,i probitm. " 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



1 



THE DRAMATIC SOCIETY 

The Dramatic Society presented 
their first performance of the "Private 
Secretary" before a large audience in 
the Montague town hall last Friday 
evening. Since the society was only 
recently organized, this was its first 
presentation of a play, and the resuit 
was very encouraging. It indicated 
that the cast had given a great deal of 
time to the work, but the success was 
due in a large measure to the inter- 
ested efforts of Mr. James K. Mills 
77, Mrs. J. K. Mills and Mr. F. B. 
McKay. 

Several members of the cast de- 
serve special mention for their w 
Zabriskie produced much mir'h as 
gruff, irascible old Cattermole, and 
Jordan portrayed the apologetic, timid 
clergyman in a very effective manner, 
while Sharpe, a sportv young man of 
high society in London, sows his wiid 
oats in quite the proper manner. The 
part of the middle-aged spinster, who 
is infatuated with spiritualism, was 
particularly weil taken by Hills, and 
the difficult parts of two giggl ng school 
girls were well taken by Goodnough 
and Wilde. Dudley represents the 
type of sport who finds it easy to call 
on his friends for financial aid, and 
Simmrns takes the part of the tailor 
who wishes to soar above his position 
to a place in high society. The cast : 

Douglas Cattermole. A. H Sharpe 11 

Mrs Stead (his landlady). 

R. C. Robinson ' 1 1 
Mr. Sydney Gibson (tailor of Bond street). 

G. W. Simmons '14 
Harry Marshland, J. E. Dudley. Jr.. '11 
Rev. Robert Spaulding (the private 

secretary). S. M. Jordan M3 



I. UK. LABROVITZ 

_. .THE 

Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits and ( rvercoatl To < >nltr 
Always a large sod select line of Foreign and Dotnestk Woolens. 

Dyeing, Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing a Specialty 

[uaranteed '' l in ■''' t'" - ' *test kinds of garments, 
Renovated Suits Pot Sale. 
A first class line of Gent's Purnisbing Goods ftlwayi on band. K. A \V. 
CoHari .mil Dress Shirts. Satisfaction guaranteed in every transaction 



1 1 Amity Street, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Tel. 302 j. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 
and 

Invitations 
Mi: mis 

Leather Dance 
Cases and 
Covers 




Fraternity 

sad 

' 'lass Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and (lass 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 



IMIOTOtJWAVUKKS 

WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 13, 1910. 



•,\v. •.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.-.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•. — .\-.\-. \\ v. ^ — . -.-.•.• 



GOODS FOR MEN. 




C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



« mj. 



C English and Scotch Woolens. 




THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. 



.• .-v.*. •.•.-.•.•.•.•. -.•.-. v. •.-.•.•.•.•.•.• 



....... 



DARTMOUTH. 







HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Class 



io.' Main St. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



Northampton, Miss 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



J. H. TROTT 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36*13. 



STEAM FI1 TIN'.. T.-lephone 59— 4. 

Q \- PI 11 ING, I INNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



Sp«cialt\ of Repairing- 



CHURCH Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lkad Lights, &c 
6 Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MASS 



FOR FARMS ! 

Kig, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or \'u inity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 

Savings Hank lii'k, 

Amherst, - Mass. 



E.R. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amiikisi, M 
Onu 1 1 1 < > i 

J H < > I U A . M . I .: K » t < 1 .T I '. -M . 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Cas admin- 
stered when desired 



Olvmpia Candy Co. 

257 Main St., 
Northampton, - - Mass. 



ALL KINDSOF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



Mr. Cattermele (Douglas's uncle) 

George Zabriskie, 2d. '13 
Miss Ashford (the Marshland governess), 

F. B. Hills '12 
Mr. Marshland (Harry's uncle), 

W. S Moir '13 
Edith Marshland (daughter to Mr. 

Marshland), H E. Goodnough '13 

Eva Webster (her friend and companion). 

E I. Wilde '12 
John (a footman), F. W. Read ' 14 



ALUMNI NOTES 

The annual reunion and informal 
banquet of the Western Alumni asso- 
ciation of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college will be held at the Union 
League club, 108 Jackson Boulevard, 
Chicago, Saturday evening, Dec. 1 7th 
at 7 o'clock, Mr. Elmer D. Hove, 
who graduated from the college in 1881 
and who is now a member of the trus- 
tees and in close touch with the work 
bring done at M. A. C. will represent 
the college, and deliver the address of 
the evening. There will be talks, col- 
lege songs by a select quartette, and 
general good cheer. Get on the ''side 
lines" for M. A. C. and let this be 
our banner meeting. If you cannot 
come, send a letter. 

In the recent state-wide competition 
in apple growing arranged by the Mass- 
achusetts State Board of Agriculture 
the Aggie graduates won as usual. 
The first prize for the best yield of 
marketable apples from an acre of 
apple orchard trees in one solid block 
went to the Drew-Munson Fruit Co. of 
Littleton. Besides George A. Drew 
and W. A. Munson, both graduate-, 
this company numbers H. L. Frost, 
graduate and trustee of the college. 
The orchard yielded 227 barrels of 
Baldwin apples, which sold for $7 15.70 
with a net profit of $519.55. 

'82. — President W. E. Stone made 
one of the tnree addresses at the dedi 
cation of the new buiidings for practi- 
cal mechanics at Purdue University. 
The description follows : The bui.d- 
ngs accommodate the department of 
oractical mechanics and provide facili- 
ties for instruction in mechanical draw- 
ing, descriptive geometry and shop 
work. Ground was broken July 22. 
i909, and the completed structure 
turned over to the University June 15. 
1910. The main b nlding contains 
25,000 square feet of floor space; csn 
accommodate at one time 400 stu- 
dents in drawing, and has locker 
accommodations for 1200 students. 
The lecture room seats 300 and there 
are two class rooms, each having a 
capacity of 60 students. The shops 
cover 43,000 square feet of ground 
and are capable of accommodating a' 
group of 350 students at one time. 
The es, tools, benches, lockers, 

in fact, all the details of thy tquipment 
are modern while many of the special 
features are unique. The buildings as 
a whole constitute what is probably the 
largest and most completely equipped 
plant * • the instruction of students in 
;id drawing in this coun- 
try am: I the accumulated 
I experience of twenty-five years at this 



AMHERST HOUSE 



BARBER 
SH0P-tx> 



The SHOP THAT LKADS 



■'i 



ALSO 



AGGIE SHOP 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



Wright 
&Ditson 

Football and Basketball suits 
the standard at all leading 
colleges. The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
( iuards the best and most pract- 
ical, also Skates and Hockey 
I , >ds. The Wright & Di't- 
JtL son Sweaters have 
%*&+* long been recognized 
_ I as the best. 

College Students and Athletes 

who want the real, superior 

■••, < article* for the different sports 

•»•• thottld get the kind that hear 

our trade-mark, Catalogue free. 

WRIGH r & D1 1SON 

vii Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 
2i Warren Street, New York City. 
84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. 
£9 Market Siift, San I ramisco. Cal, 
70 VVeyl osael so ret. Providence. K. I. 
' Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 



Laundry Work and Cleaning 
& Pressing Rightly 

I >one 

Agent for Laundry. II. \V. Hlaney, *1 1, 



S. C. I louse. 



Agent for 

Team collet ' 
Delivers 



ressing, i - .. 
Pleasant St 



L. Winn 



. Mondaj s 
bursdays ant 



tnd Thursdayi 
Saturdays 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 13, 1910. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses. 
carnations, violets and chysamhemuins 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE- 300. 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only Jrom 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Great River Water Pier Co. 

E.A.&* S.A. ALLEN, Pr*+s 

Office, Gillett BUck. 

WESTFIED, MASS. 



university. To teach manufacturing 
in the broader sense rather than 
manual training is the object ultimately 
sought in the construction and use of 
these buildings. 

Ex- '87.— J. J. Shaughnessy has 
been re-elected mayor of Marlboro. 

'08. — Hayes is at Bussey Institute 
working on a corn bulletin for the Con- 
n cticut Experiment Station. 

'08. — J. R. Parker. Boseman. 
Mont., Assistant Entomologist Mon- 
tana Experiment Station. 

'08. — The following is an extract of 
a letter from C. C. Gowdey, Entomol- 
ogist of Uganda, British East Africa : 
"I have just come from the southern 
end of Lake Albert • * * To get to 
this part of the Lake I had to go 
through a forest said to be 160 square 
miies, and my men had to Cut a path 
through the ui -'th for me. 1 

shot an elephant on the outskirts of 
this forest, but not without a little trep- 
iaation. The man that says he does 
not feel afraid when he is attacking an 
elephant is a bigger liar than I. He 
cannot but be afraid when he is at tne 
most 100 yards and more nty 

yards, from such a gigantic beast wno 
can, with apparent ease break a tree 
of three feet in diametw and who can 
walk much faster than a man can run. 
I shot my elephant at 40 yards with 
two bullets from a 400 rifle. * * * 
Earlier that morning my tracks unwit- 
tingly took me to wilhin 10 yards 1 I a 
larger elephant *nd as the grass was at 
least 20 feet high we did not see him 
until he trurrpetcd — and Jehosophat 
what a murmur! Happily, he ran 
away without charging, especially as 
both my gunbearers had run with the 
guns, and I hope never to be so afraid 
again." 

•09. — Webb is at Shrewsbury, work- 
ing on the lat;dscipe end of the new 
estate which Whiltal! of Worcester is 






». ■ ■ n ' 

'■I 



FATIMA 



v 



TURKIJH 

?J BLEND 




ROOMS WITH HEAT, 
POWER <£ LIGHT 







With ra, h patkav of 
I atim.i 1 it g-t a pen- 
nant <". • 11, 25 of 
■ //. h v 1 ure a h.ind- 
felt M&fl prn- 
nai.i (I2i 12) ntlw 
BJMtt/ 100. 



CIGARETTES 



GEOGRAPHY 



Fatima Cigarettes are 
bounded on the north by 
quality, on the south by 
individuality, on the east 
by mildness and on the west 
by value. In all the; world 
no smoke just like *em 

They compass much of 
the earth, giving much pleas- 
ure and satisfaction every- 
where. 

College men say they're 
"different." 

I k I pensively packed in 
order to give you 20 for 
1 5 cents. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 






I 



J 




FT O R ** I 



k.f n 



BALED SHAVINGS 

put up in attractive shape, 

in car lots. 

PRICE ON APPLICATION 



FRANK S. O'BRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND HACK 



preparing. 

'10 — Frank L. Thomas, acting 
secretary of 1910, has issued the call 
for contributions to the first 1910 class 
letter. Address, 3 McClelian St., 
Amherst, Mass. 

'10. — Owing to the fact that his 
position in Porto Rico made it impos- 



THE H. L FROST & BARRETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters an J Entomologists 



STAMFORD, CONN. 
There Is As Much Difference Between 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Partie 



8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, - - MASS. 

Telephone 



And many othet so-called M Basic Slags" u there la between ■ high-grade 

mixed fertiliser and .1 poor one. 

Professors M.i.nkcr and Wagner have experimented with sixteen 
different makes of Bask Slag*, and find that they vary in effect On growing 
. ropi trom eighteen to one hundred per cent 

The Total Phosphoric Acid may appear all right in a doubtful Uasic 
Slag, but remember it is Available Phosphoric Acid thai you are seeking. 
h We are Sole Agents for the Atlantic Seaboard for the Largest 
sible for him to do the work, Henry p ro ducers in the World of 
T. Cowies has resigned the office of 
class secretary and Frank L. Thomas, 
Amherst, Mass. has been appointed 
to fill the position for the remainder of 
the year. 

*10. — D. E. Bailey writes, "I have 
been analyzing butter ash, seeing if 
there was any effect on butter by wash- 
ing it with akali water. 1 believe this 
was really original work. I don't 
eve butter ash was ever analyzed 
befc " Ballej is Dairy Bio-Chem- 
ist with the Dairy Husbandry Depart- 
ment of the South Dakota Experiment 
Station, Brookings, S. D. 

MO. — Folsom has been elected 
; secretary of the Billerica Grange. 

Ex-'IO. — Harold 1. Moore is teach- 
ing at Piympton. 



Genuine Thomas Phosphate Powder 

(Basic Slag Phosphate | 

\1 nufactured by the improved German Method, and guaranteed of 
High Availability. 

It is, as you know, the best source of Phosphoric Acid and Lime, 
especially for Fruits, Legumes, Grass and Cereals. 

Special Literature free if you mention the College Signal. 

the: coe-mortimer oo. 

SPECIAL IMPORTERS 

Sole Manufacturers of E. Frank Coe Fertilizers and Peruvian Brands 

24-26 Stone St. New York City 

JOHN WOJTASZCZYK BASSALOTTI & GENTASO 



Boot & Shoes Repaired 

FIRST CLASS WORK 

Amherst, - Mass. 



FRUIT. 

CONFECTIONERY, 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

HRICKS To T \K I ROMS. 

CORNER AMITY & PLEASANT STRUTS 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 13, 1910. 



PL J. Lapoile, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



HUrO—LIVEBY— HORSE 



Tel. 183. 



Rear Draper I lotel 
Northampton. 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 




Ward's Fountain Tens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kngraved Invit.i 
HoflS, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

Wld rH 'c 57 " 63 Kranklin Street, 
TV U1U a BOSTON. 



ALL OF THE 

VARSITY MEN 

and most of the upperclassmen 
wear 

DUDLEY 

HAND KNIT 

Shaker Sweaters 

•THERE IS A REASON." 



EDWARD 1_ HAZEN, '14 



ACIF.NT FOR 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



AT M. A. C. 



BOYDEN'S 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

I las started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 

FORESTRY, 



Restaurant and Bakery 



Catering 
a Specialty 

1 96-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course .s open to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford a spit- ndid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

Kkmyon L. BtrmftriKLD, President. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society, 

Public Speaking Council, 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 



H. W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

L. E. Fagerstrom, Jr., Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill, President. 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

J. E. Dudley, Jr., President 

R. C. Barrows, President 

I. C. Gilgore, President 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST, MASS. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



J A CKSON &f CUTLER 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



CARS 



Leave AQUIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKK on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AQOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Can at Reasonable Rate* 



MANUKACTl'KKRS OK 



UN IFORMS 

< )f highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. RY. CO 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, $2. Weekly, $1. 



& j. iJ!i 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE! 



Vol. XXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 10, 191 1 



No. 13 



TRACK PROSPECTS 



Outlook for 



Team and 
Candidates. 



Progress of 



SUNDAY VESPERS 



During the past week the men have 
been showing marked improvement in 
track work and without doubt with the 
coaching of Ex-Capt. Dickinson, '10 
who has very willingly and spiritedly 
consented to help in this department, 
the men will be in good condition for 
the coming meets. 

The meets in which the team will 
be entered this season, if everything 
turns out as planned are Providence 
Feb. 4, The B. A. A. Feb. 1 1 , Law- 
rence Light Guards of Medford which 
meet will probably come Feb. 18, 
Hartford Feb. 21 and New York, the 
date of which has not been made an- 
nounced but will probably come the first 
part of March. Besides these meets 
it is expected that we will meet Tufts 
college in a dual meet, to be held at 
Amherst either the 21st or 28th of this 
month. It this schedule goes through 
it will not only be a good one but a 
very hard one. If there are any fel- 
lows who have had any experience in 
track work they are urgently asked 
to join the squad because we can ise 
more men it than are reporting at the 
present time. 

It has been said that many fellows are 
not coming out for track, for the single 
reason that only relay men are awarded 
a track M. This has been so in the 
past two years but will not be this year 
or years to come because the constitu- 
tion which has practically no rules gov- 
erning the awarding of the track M is 
being revised. The new constitution 
will without doubt contain rules similar 
to those of other colleges so that not 
enly relay men but those making points 
in the big meets such as Boston, New 
York, etc. and winning first and second 
places in dual meets will receive the 
M, If this is the only thing which has 
been keeping some men disinterested 
it need not any longer. 

1 am very sorry to have to announce 
that Capt. Dudley ' 1 1 feels that he 
can no longer retain the captaincy of 
the team for very good reasons. He 
will not only be missed as captain but 
also as a member of the relay teams. 
A meeting composed of the following 
men Capt. Dudley, Nielson, Barrows 
•11, Dee and Clapp '12; Caldwell, 
Sampson, Huntington '13, was held 
Saturday, Jan. 7, at which Barrows 
was elected acting captain until after 

[Continued on paee 4] 



HOCKEY 



HOCKEY 



Able Talk on "Needs of the Church" by 
Rev. Herbert A. Jump. 

The minister in charge of the Sun- 
day Vesper service was the Rev. Her- 
bert A. Jump of New Britain, Conn. 
His subject treated of "The Needs of 
the Christian Church" and the follow- 
ing sentence constituted his text : 
"You that come in on the Sabbath 
shall be keepers of the watch of the 
King's house," The address was in 
part : 

The church is the spiritual house 
of the King and those who worship 
there are the keepers of the watch. 
The church nowadays is not fulfilling 
its mission. It needs the help of edu- 
cated young men, college men. If 
we do not have more church-goers 
during the next quarter of a century 
than we had during the last, it is a 
sure sign that the church is morally 
degenerating. It is the duty of the 
educated young man of the present 
generation to see to it that more peo- 
ple take interest in the church. They 
must constitute themselves 'keepers 
of the watch." There are three 
things whlc! can be done »o accom- 
plish this end. They are as follows : 
First, young men must make the 
church stand for reality. At present 
it seems to deal with th3 distant world 
and does not deal with every-day life. 
Secondly, the church should be 
made a place of efficiency. It is now 
a house of traditionalism. Old and 
inefficient methods are not discarded 
for new and efficient ones. The 
"junk heap" of an industrial concern 
is one of the best symbols of success. 
Old machinery is constantly being cast 
upon the "junk heap" to be replaced 
by newer and more efficient types. 
Similarly the church should have its 
"junk heap" for old and inefficient 
methods. 

Thirdly, the church should be made 
a house of moral inspiration. Jesus 
laid emphasis upon a moral attitude 
and moral prospects. There is a 
great demand 
inspiration 



Springfield Training School Defeated. Third Game Results in a Victory Over 



Score 6-a. 

The second hockey game of the sea- 
son was played on Thursday afternoon 
Decemper 15, M. A. C. defeated 
Training School on the home rink by 
a score of 6 to 2. From the stand- 
point of both the players and spectators 
it was the best exhibit of hockey ever 
seen at M. A. C. From the time of 
the opening whistle It could easily be 
seen that the Springfield team was 
outclassed. There were, however, 
many good bits of shooting and passing 
on both sides despite the fact that the 
game was played in a snowstorm. 
The shooting of Jones and Hutchinson 
and Ackerman's guarding were the 
features of the game. Bowers and 
Capt. Berry of Springfield both played 
a brilliant game but lacked backing. 
The Training School team outweighed 
the home team but were not able to 
guard against the quick shooting of our 
forwards. 

This victory following so closely as it 
does, upon that at Williams, gives 
promise of a successful season for M. 
A C There were four freshmen in 
the line-up, and each gave promise of 



"making good, 
follows : 



The line-up was as 



m. a. c. 
Ackerman, g 
Adams (capt.) p 
Walker, Needham, c p 
Hutchinson, r c 
Jones, 1 c 
Peckham. r w 



SPRINGFIELD. 

g, Salassa 

p, Best 

c p. Cochrane 

I c, Berry (capt) 

r c. Bowers 

1 w. Smith. Warren 



Trinity. 

That the Trinity hockey team Is not 
in a class with our seven was clearly 
demonstrated in the game played on the 
rink In Elizabeth park, Hartford. Our 
boys tallied their usual six points and the 
opponents were allowed two. The 
third game of the season showed that 
the team has struck its pace and that 
team work coupled with individual 
excellence can accomplish great 
results. 

In the first half the play was wholly 
In the territory of Trinity's goal, for 
the offense was very aggressive and 
on a few necessary occasions the 
defense was ready to check attempts 
at our goal. During this period four 
goals were secured while Trinity failed 
to secure one. 

The latter part of the game showed 
some improvement In our opponent's 
playing for two goals were obtained. At 
no time, however, did they show any- 
thing like a dangerous appearance. 
The size of the rink handicapped the 
players somewhat because they were 
unaccustomed to so small a playing 
space, but the size gave an opportunity 
for individual work to show. For 
Trinity, Captain Haight and Burgwoln 
each secured one goal, while as usual 
Jones and Hutchinson proved our 
superior point-winners. Captain 

Adams on the defense played a strong 
game. The line-up : 



Sanctuary, Woolley. 1 w r w. Wilder 

Score-M. A. C 6. Springfield T. S 2. 
Goals Hutchinson 4, Jones. Peckham. 
Bowers, Berry. Referee. Henry of Am- 
herst. Timers. Hayden and Sibley of M. 
A. C. Time. 20 and 15-minute halves. 



in business for moral 
The church should supply 



RECEPTION TO SHORT COURSE 
STUDENTS 

The students of the short course 
were given a reception at the College 
Union last Wednesday evening. It 
was made informal, so that everyone 
could get acquainted and each person 
wore a tag bearing his name. The 



M. A, C 






TRINITY. 


Ackerman. g 






g, Heater 


Adams, p 






p, Morris 


Needham. c p 






c p, Rankin 


Hutchinson, r 






r, Pomeroy 


Peckham. r w 






r w, Burgwoln 


Sanctuary, Woolley, 


1 w 


1 w. Howell 


Jones, c 






c. Haight 


Score — M. A. 


C. 


6. 


Trinity 2. Goals— 



Jones 2, Hutchinson 2, Peckham 1, Wool- 
ley 1, Haight 1, Burgwoin 1. Referee— 
Coxe, Princeton "09. Timers— Collett and 
Nickerson. Goal umpires— Brainerd and 
Chapon. 



intelligent leadership for moral uplift c u ege orchestra furnished music and 



and it is from amongst enthusiastic 
college men that this leadership is to 
spring. The church that can offer 
this moral uplift is the church which 
will live. 

By living up to these three things, 
the church will be able to undergo the 
true test of the Christian church and 
that is to g.ve to all men in reality 
their daytime dreams. 



Mr. McKay recited several pleasing 
and appropriate poems. Later in the 
evening the regular students gathered 
around the piano and sang college 
songs. The reception was in charge 
of the Department of Extension 
Work, and Mr. Chesley furnished 
refreshments. 



HOCKEY SCHEDULE 

Jan. 14 — Amherst on Pratt Rink. 

Jan. 20 — Renssalaer Polytechnic Insti- 
tute at Albany. 

Jan. 2! — Luden Field Club at Albany. 

Jan. 26 — Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology on Campus. 

Jan. 28 — Springfield Training School 
at Springfield. 

Feb. 8 — Yale at New Haven. 

Feb. 1 1 — Dartmouth at Hanover. 



MASS MEETING— ASSEMBLY HOUR IN CHAPEL 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 10, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 10, 191 1. 



T H EJM) L L EGE SI G NAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS . 

EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, Editor-in-Chief. 

HAROLD F. W1LLARD, 1911. M«n»tfn* Editor. 
IRVING W. DAVIS. 1911. Alumni Note*. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY, 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYAL N.HALLOWELL.19I2. Assistant Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912. College Notes. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Department Notes. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALLEN. 1911. Business Manager. 

ALBERT W.DODGE. 1 9 12.As«t. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN. Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, JAN. 10. No 13. 

It Is with interest that we note the 
attitude of the Grange toward our col- 
lege. As both institutions are rural 
community workers, each can aid the 
other and friendly cooperation between 
them is valued. The personal efforts 
of State Master Charles M. Gardner 
are well-known and appreciated by the 
college, so it Is with pleasure that we 
note his remarks at the recent state 
meeting. 



The student body realizes that it is 
represented this year year by a hockey 
team of merit but it does not realize 
that harder games are yet to come, if 
one judges by the amount of material 
which is trying for a second team. In 
order for the best development of 
team-work, the varsity must have 
some one to play against, so all who 
know anything about the game are 
urged to give their support by prac- 
ticing with the team. 



Alumni naturally are interested in 
the affairs of classmates and friends 
known during their college days. As 
the Signal is the only college paper 
through which alumni may obtain 
news, they are urgently requested to 
forward information. The number of 
Items which can be gathered in Am- 
herst is limited, but if alumni will con- 
tribute, more space can be devoted to 
news of graduates. A scheme might 
be suggested of asking each class sec- 
retary to prepare a list of his class for 
publication semi-annually. In this way 
more items would be available. 



We take great pleasure in com- 
menting upon the choice of a new 
trustee, Mr. Frank A. Hosmer of 
Amherst. At the expiration of the 
term of Mr. Thomas L. Creeley of 
Belmont, who was on the board of 
trustees finishing the unexpired term 
of Mr. P. A. Russell, the recent elec- 
tion was made. He is well-known 
throughout the vicinity as a capable 
man in political circles and especially 



as a staunch friend of the college. We 
are sure that his efforts in behalf of 
the institution will be even greater than 
hitherto and that his Influence will 
further M. A. C. Interests. The town 
of Amherst also approves the choice of 
its first trustree. 



The appearance of the Index calls 
for a word of criticism. Several ova- 
tions in the book are good, deserving 
commendation, as the cuts at the 
head of each page, the combination of 
Junior statistics with personal writings, 
the number of cuts and their general 
good quality. However, as a repre- 
resentive publication of the college 
a few things are not of a proper qual- 
ity. The personal Junior write-ups 
are knocks which do not fairly give a 
man's class or college standing and 
numerous articles contained in the 
"grinds" section are not a clean or 
wholesome picture of real M. A. C. 
conditions. Such portraitures do not 
appeal as an advertisement for the 
college. 



editor's note. 

Instructors in charge of courses are 
requested to announce through the 
Signal any new, or changes in old, 
courses. 

The following is the standing of 
Signal competitors up to Jan. 1 , 
1911, J. Carpenter. 17.07; S.Wil- 
liams, 15.58; J. A. Harlow, 13.26; 
H. C. Hutchings, 4.75; G. Zabriskie. 
18.66; O. G. Anderson, 12.35; S. 
B. Foster. 7.48; G. O. Albee, 4.90; 
S. R. Damon, 0.68. 



CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in the 
Signal Office or lunded to E. M. Brown 1 1 , on or 
before the Saturday preceding each issue. J 

Jan. 10 — 6-45 p. m. Stockbridge club 

in Agricultural Recitation 

Room. 

7-00 p. m. Glee Club rehearsal 

in Chapel. 

7-15 p. M. Junior Landscape 

club in Wilder Hall. 
Jan. 11 — 3-30 p. m. Student Mass 

meeting. 

7-00 m. p. Debating Club in 

Public Speaking Room. 

7-00 p. m. Mandolin Club 

rehearsal in chapel. 
12—6-45 p. m, Y. M. C. A. in 

chapel. 
14 — 3-00 p. m. Hockey with 

Amherst at Pratt Rink. 
15 — 5-00 p. m. Vesper Service, 

Rev. Philip Moxom of 

Springfield. 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



FRATERMITY NOTES 

An omission in the list of freshmen 
pledged to Q. T. V. in the last issue 
was R. W. Warner of Sunderland. 

George W. Simmonds pledged to 
Theta Phi wishes to state that he can- 
not join a fraternity at the present 
time. 



UP- TO - DATE 



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Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



TRAVELING 

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NEW STYLES 



Shaving Mirrors. 



DEUEL'S 



Drug Store 



THURBER'S 

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SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 
Rings, Charms ..... Prizes. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.'. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
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UNION ENTERTAINMENT 

At the Social Union entertainment 
Saturday evening In the Chapel, Mr. 
G. 0. Shields of New York City gave 
a most interesting and instructive stere- 
opticon lecture on "Birds and Wild 
Animals." 

Mr. Shields prefaced his lecture 
with a few remarks on the Ecomic 
Value of Insect-killing Birds. The 
farmers of the entire country, he said, 
are loosing annually one billion dollars, 
from the ravages of insects. We 
speak of one billion dollars, but few 
people have any definite idea as to 
what an immense sum one billion dol- 
lars really is. If one billion dollar 
bills were stacked in a pile, they would 
make a colume one foot square and 
fifty-six feet high. This tremendous 
loss Is due to the fact that the birds, 
which live on Insects, have been prac- 
tically wiped off the map. In the state 
of Texas the cotton growers are losing 
every year from forty to fifty million 
dollars from the work of the boll- 
weevil. Government entomologists 
studied the situation for two years and 
then declared that birds were the only 
possible remedy. Thirty-five years 
ago, quail and prairy-chickens were so 
plentiful that one stumbled onto them 
on every hand. These birds lived on 
the boll-weevil. To-day there are not 
more than one hundred coveys of quail 
in the entire state, while the prairie 
chickens are practically extinct. Asa 
result, the state is overrun with these 
insects; thirty per cent, of the entire 
cotton output is sacrificed to them 
annually. In nearly every state In the 
Union the farmers and governments are 
spending large sums for the extermina- 
tion or rather an attempt to extermi- 
nate some insect. This enormous ex- 
penditure has been made necessary by 
the wholesale destruction of birds. 

In his lecture Mr. Shields showed 
some remarkable photographs of the 
wild animals and birds that inhabited 
the different sections of the country. 
Some of the photographs were really 
wonderful and Mr. Shields may well be 
proud of them. They are a convinc- 
ing argument for the substitution of the 
camera for the gun. 



C. R. ELDER 



The College Drug Store 



Within the last week three new 
silver cups have been placed in the 
Trophy room. They are the cups 
won by the stack judging team at the 
Brockton fair last October. The con- 
test is held annually by the New Eng- 
land federation of agricultural students 
and is very similar to that of the 
national dairy show for western colleges. 
The contest this year was between the 
Massachusetts Agricultural college, 
New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine. 
The winning team was composed of 
P. W. Pickard '11, H. A. Pauly Ml, 
A. T. Conant 'II, and N. H. Hill 'II 
as alternate. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CIOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
•\ to serve the M. A. C. students 



with the 



BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 

Hatters, 

Tailors. 



C&rpfrvter & Morehous*, 

PRINTERS, 






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Established 




1851 



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New York 



Headquarters For 

Chemicals, Chemical, Physical, Bacteriological 
Apparatus and Assay Goods 

We carry the largest stock of Laboratory Supplies in the U. S. 

PROMPT SERVICE 






The trustees of the college held a 
meeting at the college on Friday, 
Jan. 6. 



Our European connections are such that we are enabled to offer you 
the best service for duty-free importations on scientific supplies at the 
lowest prices. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 10, 191 1. 




SOME of the College Professors are kick- 
ing at the foot-ball business. If they 
only kick hard enough they can raise 
the standard and lower the death rate. 

We'll agree to make it hot for the spectators 
by supplying good warm clothing. 

Suits, overcoats and everything for men 
and boys to wear. 
Sweaters for the girls, as well as for the 

Better to take an overcoat than to take 
a cold. , , . 

You can take one of our very taking top 
coats for $20. If you take a cold it may 
cost you a lot more. 



TRACK 

[Continued from page 1 .] 



the team is organized when a per- 
manent one will be elected. The 
opinion of the Athletic Board was 
asked and they advised that those men 
making points in the Union and Hart- 
ford meets or running on the relay at 
the latter choose an acting captain. 
Barrows is therefore declared acting 
captain for the time being. 

R. W. Piper. 



COOLEY BROS. 



Westfield, 



Mass. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



STUDENT 
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RUGS 
CARPETS 

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gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



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CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



H. W. FIELD 

... FtORIST ... 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



OPP. ACAUKMV Of Ml SI( , 

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M. D. OILMAN. C. A. MOFrKT. 

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GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



1912 INDEX APPEARS 

Every body who proposed to live the 
last days of the old year right and get 
the most pleasure from his Christmas 
holidays secured an Index to help him 
on the way ; to the end that the busi- 
ness department was able to dispose of 
many copies of an excellent and repre- 
sentative publication. 

As most of the alumni are aware, 
the Index is the M. A. C. student 
annual edited by a board chosen wholly 
from members of the junior class. It 
is moreover, a publicity jonrnal wherein 
the foibles and follies of the juniors 
collectively and individually are brought 
to lignt to be condemned or applauded. 

Some of the juniors are reported in 
the throes of mental spasms, under 
the sting of the literary lash. In truth, 
there's a reason. It's an unbalancing 
shock to read in the Index that you 
are no better than the brown scum on 
mother earth when your own private 
esteem always led you to believe that 
you were one of the earth's elect and 
just a little better than the best, 

If the Index is to be criticised at all 
unfavorably let it be said that it is a 
trifle "fresh." One of the professors 
on the campus had this Idea when he 
purchased a copy. The young man 
in charge of the books said: 

"Let me get you a nice fresh one 
right out of the box, professor." 

And the professor is reported to have 
worn a rather grim smile as he 
answered, "Oh! these books are quite 
fresh enough without the box.'* 

Recognizing the fact that a college 
annual should be statistical rather than 
literary, all editorial and superfluous 
descriptive matter was dispensed with 
and the book modeled along the lines 
of the best of the similar contempora- 
neous publications in other colleges. 
The alumni lists were corrected up to 
date under the direction of Mr. Watts, 
secretary of the alumni association. 
A larger number of drawings and half 
tones than in previous years was 
Inserted, drawings that are a credit to 
the artists and to the book and not, as 
lias too often been the case, disfigure- 
ments. Instead of a paragraph devoted 
to the details of the life history of each 
member of ihe junior class a few lines 
were devoted to each man's caricature. 

It is not to compliment the board of 
editors of the Index but to note with 
gratitude and appreciation the increase 
in scope and strength of every function 
of the college life, in saying that the 
present volume is a trifle superior to 
any that has preceded it. 



A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



Clapp, '12. 



Beers, '12. 



We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



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No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 10, 191 1. 



DEPARTMENT OF SHORT 
COURSES. 

The short winter course of ten 
weeks opened Monday Jan. 2 with 
a registration of 104, nearly twice 
as many as last year. The depart- 
ment is seriously handicapped by 
lack of room. The classrooms are 
crowded and the accommodations at 
the dining hall are not adequate. The 
limited courses are full, and in two 
cases special divisions have been 
formed to accommodate the extra 
students. The courses offered are as 
follows : 

1. Soil Fertility. 

2. Market Gardening. 

3. Fruit Growing. 

4. Floriculture. 

5. Field Crops. 

6. Breeds and Breeding. 

7. Feeding and Management. 

8. Animal Disease and Stable 
Sanitation. 

9. Dairying. 

10. Dairy Bacteriology. 

11. Botany. 

12. Entomology. 

13. Mechanics. 

14. Farm Accounts. 

15. Farm Buildings and Ma- 
chinery. 

16. Landscape Gardening. 

17. The Farm and the Commu- 
nity. 

18. Forestry. 

19. Meats, Meat Production and 
Marketing. 

The courses in Pomology, Agrono- 
my and Dairying seem to be the 
most popular. On Feb. 26, an addi- 
tional poultry course will be opened. 

EXTENSION! DEPARTMENT. 

The department has published from 
time to time 4-8 page leaflets con- 
taining information desirable to farmers. 
The writing is done by specialists and 
is in such a form that it is available to 
all classes. The publications up to 
date have been : 

1. Corn. 

2. Spraying. 

3. Books for Farmers. 

4. Bee-keeping. 

5. Care of Shade Trees. 
The college will send an exhibit of 

corn to the National Corn Exhibition 
to be held in Columbus. Ohio. 

In co-operation with Mr. Redman, 
county secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 
for Franklin county, the department 
is planning to hold meetings in that 
section. There will be one meeting 
held in the different localities selected 
with a general round-up to be held at 
some central place in the spring. 

The subjects discussed will be of 
local interest differing from r.^ple- 
growlng to market-gardening with the 
locality. 



A mass meeting of students, alumni 
and faculty was held in the Brown 
Union last week and a vote was taken 
to re-establish athletic relations with 
Dartmouth for the coming year. 



DEBATES FOR 1910-11 

At its meeting on Dec. 15th, the 
Public Speaking Couecil chose the 
question for the Second Annual Debate 
to be held at Assembly, March 8th 
next. It is as follows: "Resolved 
that the Republican party is entitled to 
popular support. The preliminaries 
to this debate will commence Feb. 
10th or 13th next. Two contestants 
will be chosen from the freshman- 
sophomore contest, two from the 
junior-senior contest, and two from 
the debating club contest. These 
six men will be arranged in two teams 
for the Annual Debate. The prizes 
offered are a gold medal and $15 to 
each of the three men ranking highest. 
All men expecting to make a showing 
in the preliminaries should make a 
thorough preparation of arguments on 
the above question, as the men who 
have already indicated their intention 
of entering assure that more and better 
material is trying for the team than 
before. This year Bates college is to 
propose the question for the Intercollege 
Debate to be held at Lewiston, Me., 
next May. 



GRANGE NOTES 

Extracts from the Annual address of 
of 1910 before the State Grange by 
Charles M. Gardner, State Master. 

The Grange maintains and will con- 
tinue to maintain a vigorous and help- 
ful interest in the other institutions of 
the Commonwealth which are seeking 
to benefit agriculture. It must throw 
all its strength to the aid of the Massa 
chusetts Agr cultural College, which is 
doing a grander work for the farm and 
for farm interests to-day than It ever 
did before. The annual appropriations 
of the State for college purposes con- 
stitute the most profitable investment 
which the Commonwealth Is making at 
the present time. Wonderful Indeed 
has been the progress of the college In 
the last five years. That progress 
must continue and the Massachusetts 
State Grange may well give its heart- 
iest endorsement, support and assis- 
tance to the institution, its adminstra- 
tion and all its pians for extension and 
advancement. 



44 



PROF. STOCK" 



All<l Ilia* >Iiik1i- l-.li'iiii'iit l>o«t 1 III.'. 

Professor Stockbridge had no patience with so-called single 

element doctrine, which depends for its success on the potential 

fertility — no patience with the farmer who was trying to find out lot 

himself if he could leave out any one of the three leading elements 

of plant nutrition (nitrogen, potash and phosphoric arid), or how 

little of each he could get along with. That was a proper ■ttbje* 1 

for the scientific worker to investigate but until he knew mote 

about it, the practical farmer, who had his living to make and 

his bills to pay, should not tinker with it. To Stockbridge it 

meant, in the end, improvident fanning. At best, the farmer had 

to take great chances, especially with the weather, the largest 

factor in crop raising, over which he had no control, but he 

should take no chances with the tilings which he could control. 

AOMMf these were the amount and kind of manure which hr u 

plied to his crops. Thus, if he hoped for a stated crop he should 

at least fertilize intelligently for that crop. For the man who was 

dependent on his crops any other course was unwise Moreover, 

any other course would leave the soil machine in a poorer coadl 

tion than he found it. Broadly speaking, to encourage him to 

takeout more than he put back was not only bad economy, but 

bad morals, and should be discouraged, for in the end it would 

lead to crop bankruptcy. 



BOWKER 



Study the plant food pioblnn. " 

Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



I. IKE. LABROVITZ 

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Amherst, Mass. 



Tel. 302-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 



Resolutions of the Massachusetts State 

Grange. 

Introduced by W. O. Parmenter. 

Whereas the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College has established ex- 
tension work as a part of its general 
policy, and is endeavoring in this way 
to be added help to the farmers of 
Massachusetts be it therefore Resolved, 

By the Massachusetts State Grange 
in annual session assembled in Wor- ; 
cester, Mass., Dec. 13-14-15, 1910, j 
that we cordially endorse this exten- j 
sion work of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, and that we urge the 
legislature to make adequate appropria- 
tion for the same. And be further 
Resolved, that we specifically endorse 
the idea of a campaign of education 
through the extension work of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College for 
the benefit of the Milk producers and 
Milk consumers of the State. 

This was duly passed without one 
dissenting vote. 



COMPANY 



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Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 
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WORKS, 17th STREET A LEH/GH AVENUE 
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The College Signal, Tuesday, January 10, 191 1, 



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COMMUNICATION 

(Communications to the Signal concerning mat- 
ters of general Interest are welcomed. The Signal 
is not to be held responsible (or the opinions thus 
expressed ) 

To the Editor. College Signal: 

The class of 1905, fully appreciat- 
ing the value of class alumni notes, 
takes this opportunity of stating that it 
has decided to send to the College 
Signal once each year through its 
secretary a complete set of statistics 
concerning the location and occupa- 
tions of the different members of 1905. 
The value of alumni notes published 
in a college organ never can appeal to 
any undergraduate as it does to even 
the most unprogressive alumnus. 
Whatever else may be his interests, 
an alumnus of an Institution will 
eagerly devour each bit of news con- 
cerning a fellow alumnus. He will 
oftentimes admit that almost his only 
interest in the publication is for the 
alumni news. The Massachusetts 
Agricultural College publishes no paper 
exclusively for the benefit of the 
alumni; the day is coming when it 
will publish such a paper. At present 
the Signal must fill the double need. 
How can it best be done? By trust- 
ing entirely to the efforts of the under- 
graduates for the publication of this 
information? I think quite the oppo- 
site. The only one best solution is for 
the paper to receive the full support of 
the alumni through the various class 
secretaries. The undergraduate edi- 
tor should s%e that these men are kept 
I in intimate touch with the Sicnal and 
endeavor to organize some system for 
the receipt of alumni notes and their 
publication by classes. 

These few suggestions may be of 
some value in directing a step in the 
proper direction. Always remember 
that one of the best ways of fulfilling 
the requirements of the alumni is to 
let them know about themselves and 
the college. 

In the interest of M. A. C, 

A. D. Taylor. 1905. 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 10, 1911 



THE OLD CORP DRUB STORE. 



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The place to have your group and single pictures taken correctly. Call 
and make your appointments. Visitors welcome. 



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Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHEKST. MASS 

FOR FARMS ! 

Big. Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Savings Bank BPk, 
Amherst, - Mass. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DBNTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 
Oto 1UA.M. ItBOtoSPiM, 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas adniin- 
stered when desired 



Olvmpia Candy Co. 

257 Main St., 
Northampton, - - Mass 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

ZOOLOGY. 

G. A. Post, class of 1913, has pre- 
sented a collection of eggs to the 
Zoological Museum. 

Several specimens for the Zoological 
Museum have been received from J. 
A. Hyslop '08, at present in Wash- 
ington. 

M. S. Hazen '10 has contributed a 
box of specimens of the different kinds 
of coal and also some fine specimens 
of fossil shark's teeth. 

D. N. West of the class of 1902 
has contributed to the Geological 
Museum several specimens of asbestos 
in various stages of preparation, in- 
cluding a one hundred pound piece of 
asbestos bearing rock. 



Wright 
& Ditson 

Football and Basketball suits 
the standard at all leading 
colleges. The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
Guards the best and most pract- 
ical, also Skates and Hockey 
Goods. The Wright & Dit- 
son Sweaters hair 
long been recognized 
as the best. 



A 



$ 



* 



College Students and Athletes 

!*r?rf- who want the real, superior 

«■«. <w" articles for the different sports 

u. m. *«t o,r should get the kind that bear 

our trade-mark. Catalogue Jree. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

22 Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

76 Weybosset Street, Providence, R. I 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

NINETEEN-F1VE. 

Adams, R. L., M. S., 331 Cayuga 
! St., Salinas, Cal. Director of 
Spreckels Sugar Co., Agr'l Exp. Sta., 
Spreckles, Cal. 

Allen, G. H., 11 Wiliiam St.. West 
! Somerville, Mass. Engaged in whole- 
sale manufacture of confectionery, 
Boston. 

Barnes, H. L.. Lakeview Farm, 
i Interlaken, Stockbridge. Farmer. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 
Done 

Agent for Laundry, H. W. Blaney, 'n. 
C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, E. L. Winn, 87 
Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursday 
Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
. .unations, violets and chysant hemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 

WOODWARD'S 
LONGH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only Jrom 1 A. M. to 4 A.M. 



Great River Water Power Go. 

E.A.SfS.A. ALLEN, Props. 
Office, Gillett Block. 

WESTFIED, MASS. 



ROOMS WITH HEAT, 
POWER <£ LIGHT 

F*0 R KE> IV T 



BALED SHAVINGS 

put up in attractive shape, 

in car lots. 

PRICE ON APPLICATION 



FRANK S. O'BRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND MACK 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 



8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, - - MASS. 

Telephone 



Bartlett. F. A.. Stamford, Conn. 
H. L. Frost & Bartlett Co. 
■ Crosby. H. D., Rutland. Farmer. 
Cushman, Esther C, 683 Hope 
St.. Providence, R. I. Assistant at 
Ammary Brown Memorial. 

Gardner. J. J., Durham. N. H. 
Instructor at New Hampshire State 
College. 

Gay, R. P., 44 Mariner's Place. 
Plainfield. N. J. 

Hatch. W. B.. North Amherst. 
With Olmsted Bros., Landscape Ar- 
chitects, Brookline. 

Holcomb, C. S., 67 Walnut St., 
Somerville. Student at New England 
Conservatory of Music. 

Hunt, T. F. , Care Botany Bldg.. 
U. of C, Berkeley, Cal. Plant 
Pathologist. 

Ingham, N. D., Santa Monica, Cal. 
In charge of Califoania State Experi- 
ment Station for the study of 
Eucalyptus. 

Kelton, J. R., 34 Pearl St., Am- 
sterdam, N. Y. Teacher. 

Ladd, E. T., 609 Falls Road Ter- 
races, Roland Park, Md. Baugh 
Chemical Co., 1 Ith Ave. and Clinton 
St., Canton, Baltimore, Md. Chemist. 
Lewis, C. W., Melrose Highlands. 
Lyman, J. F., Ph. D., 1345 High- 
land St., Columbus. Ohio. Assistant 
Professor of Chemistry, Ohio State 
University. 

Munson, W. A., Littleton. Man- 
ager for Drew-Munson Co. Fruit 
Grower. 

Newhall, E. W.. Santa Maria. 
Santa Barbara Co., Cal. Superin- 
tendent of Newhall Ranch. 
Patch, G. W., 260 Broadway, Arling- 
ton. Purchasing agent for Brown, 
Durrell Co., 104 Kingston St., 
Boston. 

Sanborn Taft, Mrs. M. L., Brooks 
Farm, Northfield, Vt., R. F. D. 4. 

Sears. W. M., Frankiin. Farmer. 
"Laymour" Fruit and Poultry Farm. 
Swain, A. N., 15 Merlin St., Dor- 
chester Center. Boston representa- 
tive Munson, Whitaker Co., 623 Tre- 
mont Building, Boston. 

Taylor. A. D.. M. S., 1 101 - 1 104 
Tremont Building, Boston. Personal 
representative and general superintend 
ent for Warren H. Manning, Land- 
scape Designer, Boston. Junior mem 
ber, American Society of Landscape 
Architect.-,. 

Tompson, H. F., Attleboro, R. F. 
D. 4. Manager of Reade Fruit Farm 
and Market Garden. 

Tupper, B., West Newton. Man- 
ager of Wauwinet Farm. 

Walker. L. S., 19 Phillips St., 
Amherst. Chemist, Mass. Agr'l Exp. 
Station. 

Whitaker, C. L., 103 Union Ave.. 
Mt. Vernon, N. Y. With Munson- 
Whitaker Co., offices Boston, New 
York, Chicago. 

Williams, P. P., Auburn, Ala. 
State Horticulturist and Professor of 
Horticulture, Alabama State College. 
Willis, G. N., 82 Bromfield Road, 
West Somerville. Resident Engineer 
on Highway Construction. 

Yeaw, F. L.. University of Califor- 
nia, Berkeley, Cal. Plant Pathol- 
ogist. 



■ i ..I... .. 1 . . .. 1 .1 . 11 — — - 

'■'■■■:'■ .•■'.;■'.•■■... 



FATIMA 




: 






With em h pet £<>?« of 
I alima r/mj % I a pen- 
rani i"<ip< *k 2 5 «/ 
t! 7./\ h .1 i ore a hunJ- 

si m • i H < ' /< | ■• p n- 
i,.. i, I i l.'\ I I * /«- 

Horn of 100. 




TURKISH 

BLEND 

CIGARETTES 



ECONOMICS 



When value, based on 
merit, is considered your 
enjoyment is doubled. 

The delightfully differ- 
ent Fatimas invariably 
make a friend. 

They fascinate, satisfy 
and appeal to the man 
who likes rare tobaccos 
skillfully blended. 

No gold tips or fancy 
box, but ten additional cig- 
arettes. 20 for 15 cents. 









THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 

1 

- I t . » ■».. i i-- i -»» u, i ■ "i. ' . , .. i " r . : . T'' 



••• • ' • .v;W. J ' .v ' 



m***" 




THE H. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



STAMFORD, CONN. 



There Is As Much Difference Between 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

And many other so-called "Basic Slags" as there is 1>. tween I high-grade 

mixed fertilizer and a poor one. 

Professors Maen.ker and Wagner have experimented with sixteen 
different makes of liasic Slags, and find that they vary in effect on growing 
crops from eighteen to one hundred per cent. 

The Total Phosphoric Acid may appear all right in a doubtful Hasic 
Slag, but remember it is Available Phosphoric Acid that you are seeking. 

We are Sole Agents for the Atlantic Seaboard for the Largest 
Producers in the World of 

Genuine Thomas Phosphate Powder 

(Basic Slag Phosphate) 

Manufactured by the improved German Method, and guaranteed of 
High Availability. 

It is, as you know, the best source of Phosphoric Acid and Lime, 
especially for Fruits, Legumes, Grass and Cereals. 

Social Literature free if you mention the College Signal. 

the: coe-mortimer co. 

SPECIAL IMPORTERS 

Sole Manufacturers of E. Frank Coe Fertilizers and Peruvian Brands 

24-26 Stone St. New York City 

BASSALOTTI & GENTASO 



JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 

Boot & Shoes Repaired 

FIRST CLASS WORK 

Amherst, - Mass. 



FRUIT. 

CONFECTIONERY, 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

■ RICH TO TAKK HOMR. 

CORNER AMITY & PLEASANT STREETS 






8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 10, 191 1. 



PI. J. Lame, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



fl U T 0— LIVERY HORSE 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Has started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 



Tel. 183. 




FOR 



RY, 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 

Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Knvelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kngraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

XW<* t-A 'c 57 * 63 Franklin stree, < 

"dlUa BOSTON. 



ALL OF THE 

VARSITY MEN 

and most of the upperclassmen 
wear 

DUDLEY 

HAND KNIT 

Shaker Sweaters 

"THKRE IS A REASON." 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course .s open to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford a splendid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

Kknyon L. Butterfield, President. 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society, 

Public Speaking Council, 



EDWARD l_. HAZEN, '14 



AHENT FOR 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



H. W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

L. E. Fagerstrom, Jr., Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill, President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

J. E. Dudley, Jr., President 

R. C. Barrows, President 

I. C. Gilgore, President 



IP hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



AT M. A. C. 



BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Amherst, Mass. 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressinc, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



CARS 



Leave AOCJIK COLLEGE for HOI - 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST lor AQOJE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mini, past each 
HOUR. 

Special Can at Reasonable Rate* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

AH the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, tf. Sunday, $2. Weekly, %i. 




V 






COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XXI. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 17, 191 1. 



No. 14 



FIRST SMOKER 



Rev. Dr. Lyon Speaks on The Triangle 
of Progress. 



Saturday night a goodly crowd enjoyed 
our first smoker. After a few college 
songs, Captain Martin introduced the 
speaker of the evening, Rev. Dr. Lyon 
of Holyoke. His witty stories, his 
forceful language, and his straight- 
forward, earnest delivery will be re- 
membered as one of the best talks of 
the college year. 

In taking "The Triangle of Pro- 
gress" for my subject, I had in mind, 
the triangle on the Y. M. C. A. pin. 
On the sides of this triangle are the 
words, Body. Mind and Spirit. I have 
named the sides of my triangle, Right 
Acquisition, Right Distribution, and 
Right Coordination. 

Right Acquisition is or.e of the great 
objects of life. Every man should 
have a restrained desire to get rich, 
a desire to become a kind of reservoir 
in which is stored wealth in money 
and education to be distributed to 
others. But, it must be understood 
that the man who does have the ca- 
pacity and ability for acquiring riches, 
stands little chance of being success- 
ful. Capacity to fill is just as neces- 
sary as is the something to be filled. 
Men should under restraint, seek to 
acquire honestly everything possible. 
This is an age of getting, and the man 
who has no ambition, no desire to get 
something is not a true, virile man, 
not a good college man. It is a time 
when an honest man is anxious to get 
all he can out of his business, his pro- 
fession, his college course ; he wants 
to be a constructive force in the 
world. To be a constructive force a 
man must have the constructive sinews, 
he must have a lot of enthusiasm, real 
enthusiasm with something back of 
it. A man may have the best inten- 
tions in the world, but without the pur- 
pose to carry out these good intentions, 
they are worth very little. 

The great question of the future will 
be, what have you got and how did you 
get it? One cannot acquire rights with- 
out having to stand before the world and 
answer these questions. You are com- 
ing out of college prepared to take 
your place in the world's affairs. Did 
you play the game fair every minute 
of those four years? Any unfair ac- 
tion will be a thorn in your flesh in af- 
ter years. The rules of the game 
prevail through life just as they do in 

(CoaHmied en pea* S] 



ALUMNI BANQUET 

Western Alumni Hold Annual Banquet 
in Chicago. 

The Western Alumni of M. A. C. 
held their annual reunion and banquet 
at the Union League Club, Chicago, 
during the last part of December. 
Although the attendance was not as 
large as last year, the enthusiasm and 
interest manifested in the affairs and 
progress at M. A. C. was stronger than 
ever before, and the meeting proved a 
grand success. 

Myron H. West, as toastmaster, in 
introducing Elmer D. Howe '81, the 
representative of the college, spoke of 
his relations to M. A. C. as an alum- 
nus and as one of its trustees, of the 
interest he has always shown and of 
the results brought about by his efforts. 
Mr. Howe spoke of the develop- 
ments at M. A. C. since the members 
present have graduated, the new 
Improvements which are being made 
from year to year, the increase In 
numbers cf the faculty and the enroll- 
ment of students and of the new 
courses offered. He stated that the 
standard of the college has been raised 
and that the entrance requirements are 
now up to the standard of the Carnegie 
Foundation and that alteady members 
of the faculty have been made benefic- 
iaries under that institution. 

Among the recent college events 
referred to were the death of Dr. 
Goessmann, the resignation of Prof. 
Charles Fernald, and the leave of 
absence granted Professor Mills, whose 
place as dean has been given to Pro- 
fessor Paige, who is doing exception- 
ally well in the discharge of his new 
duties. Mr. Howe spoke very highly 
of President Butterfield and the work 
he is doing for M. A. C. Among 
other things fostered by the President, 
are the wonderful appropriations 
received from the state, for new build- 
ings, equipment and maintenance, the 
new bungalow dormitory system and 
the development of the athletic field. 
In closing, Mr. Howe assured all, 
that M. A. C. has in the past and is 
today producing leaders, men who are 
needed in all industries and professions, 
All the members present were called 
upon by toastmaster West to give 
short talks showing how they had been 
beneftted by M. A. C. in their various 
occupations. It was generally con- 
ceded that the broad general education 
received at M. A. C. had been more 



SUNDAY VESPERS 



THE PAST YEAR 



(Continued on pace S-I 



Service Conducted by Rev. Philip S. 
Moxom of Springfield. 

"Salt is good, but if the salt 
becomes saltless. wherewith shall you 
season it. Have salt in yourselves 
and be at peace with one another." 
The above is the text selected by the 
Rev. Philip S. Moxom of Springfield 
in his address during Sunday Vespers. 
He went on to say "every man shall 
be salted with fire. This does not 
mean literally roasted by fire, but puri- 
fied. Salt is an antiseptic, conse- 
quently it purifies. This, therefore, 
explains the connection between salt 
and fire. Salt stands for a purifying 
energy, for hospitality, as a symbol oi 
savor. As applied to a person, he has 
force, individual qualities, has piquancy 
of wit. Without salt, a man has no 
character, he stands for nothing, he 
has no convictions, he has no desire 
for truth. Lack of salt indicates lack 
of moral stamina and decision, lack of 
individuality. 

Individuality and firm convictions 
give character. Believe something 
and take it into Ihe innermost recesses 
of your soul. We are invited to 
believe in God, in duty, and in the 
human soul. The question which 
may possibly arise with regard to this 
is what is God, what is duty, and what 
is the human soul ? Some people 
believe formally in God but have no 
grip on their convictions. To be indif- 
ferent is to be unchristian. It is 
impossible for a strong and useful man 
not to believe in God. Every person 
has some great task to accomplish. 
Don't shrink from this task, but make 
the most of it. Have salt in your- 
selves. Some say that it is impossible 
to believe In immortality. Such a 
belief gives a dark and gloomy aspect 
to death. If individual man perish 
forever, his character perishes forever. 
Why should a man be given strong and 
marked characteristics if they are to 
forever pass away at the coming of 
death ? It is a tremendous achieve- 
ment to believe in immortality. It 
means such a layi g hold of the reality 
of God that the soul lives by and in 
him. A firm belief in these three 
things, God, duty, and immortality, 
gives a man the salt without which we 
have no character. 

"Have salt in yourselves and have 
peace with one another." A gruff, 
harsh person acts as salt upon an open 

(Continued oa par* 5.] 



President and Treasurer Submit Annual 
Reports. 



Extracts from the president's and 
treasurer's reports for year ending 
Nov. 30, 1910. 

The following statistics are items of 
interest from the report just Issued : 

The legislative appropriation of 
$17,500 for the purchase of land has 
enabled the college to acquire the 
larger proportion of the land on which 
options were held. The legislative 
appropriations for land made during 
the past three years aggregate 
$23,500. This money has been ex- 
pended in acquiring the following par- 
cels: 1908, $500; 1909, $5500; 
1910, $17,500; total, $23,500. 

Appropriations for two new buildings 
were granted by the Legislature— 
$12,000 for a laboratory for pomology 
and market gardening, and $10,000 
for a building for animal husbandry. 
The former building, while essentially 
an Instruction building, will afford ad- 
mirable facilities for both experiment 
and teaching in the subject of cold 
storage of fruits and vegetables, for 
packing and for other forms of labora- 
tory work in pomology. The animal 
husbandry building fills a serious gap 
in the college equipment, enabling the 
courses in stock judging to be put on a 
thoroughly modern basis, affording also 
ample room for the large classes enter- 
ing during the short winter courses, 
serving as an auditorium for gatherings 
of farmers to witness demonstrations 
of various sorts, and, in general, as an 
arena for demonstration Instruction. 

Below are presented a few facts 
concerning the details ot the work of 
the extension service during the past 
year: 
Enrollment in conference of rural social 

workers, 335 

Grange lecturers in above. 40 

Enrolment In farmers' week. 550 

Lectures given by faculty, 159 

Lectures refused, 197 

Total number of correspondence courses.252 
Demonstration orchards. 6 

Better farming trains — 
Boston & Albany 4 days 

Trolly. 3 days 

Attendance at lectures, given from 

above, 9000 

Exhibits at fairs (five or six lectures 
and demonstrations given each 
day at each fair), 5 

Ten-weeks' course, enrollment. 64 

Poultry course, enrollment, 51 

Beekeepers' course, enrollment, 20 

Summer school, enrollment, 229 



[Continued on pace 4] 



Social Union Whist-Smoker Saturday Evening 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 17, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 17, 1911 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, Editor-ln-Chtef. 

HAROLD F. W1LUARD. 1911, Managing Editor. 
IRVING W. DAVIS, 1911. Alumni Notea. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY, 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYALN.HALLOWELL.19I2. Assistant Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912. College Note*. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT, 1912. Department Notes. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALLEN, 1911. Business Manager. 

ALBERT W.DODGE. 1912. Asst. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN. Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
P—t Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, JAN. 17. No 14. 



CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped In the 
Signal Office or handed to E. M. Brown 1 I , on or 
before the Saturday preceding each Issue.) 



M. 



Appreciation of the department 
lecture courses in Floriculture and 
Pomology was shown last week by the 
attendance at Mr. Thylo's and Profes- 
sor Jarvis' lectures. These systems 
of lectures are instructive to all as 
they are given by practical men on 
practical subjects. 



Stockbridge 
Recitation 



Jan. 17—6-45 F 

in Agricultura 

room. 

7-00 p. m., Glee club rehearsal 

in Chapel. 

7-15 P. m., Junior Landscape 

Club in Wilder Hall. 

Jan. 18 — 3-30 p. m., Band concert. 

7-00 p. m., Debating club in 

Public Speaking room. 

7-00 p. m., Mandolin club 

rehearsel in Chapel. 
Jan. 19-6-45 p. m., Y. M. C. A. in 

Chapel. 

Jan. 20— Hockey Rensaeiaer Poly- 
technic Institute at Albany. 

Jan. 21— Hockey Luden Field club at 
Albany. 

2-00 P, M,, Rifle team shoot- 
ing at Indoor Range in Drill 
hall. 

2-00 p, m., Demonstration of 
Veal and Lamb in Drill hall. 

Jau. 24 — 5-00 p. m,, Vesper Service 
in Chapel, Rev. Clarence E. 
Swift of Fall River. 



UP -TO - PATH 



FOOTWEAR 



PUMPS 



ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 



TENNIS SHOES 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



The idea of getting together for a 
more Informal gathering than the Sat- 
urday evening entertainments have 
afforded, resulted in a college smoker, 
which proved a marked success. 
These assemblings surely bring the 
students, and faculty more closely 
together and means of promoting 
such relations are valuable. The 
forceful and manly talk at this 
smoker was one which inspires men 
to act nobler, and more good can be 
accomplished at talks of this nature 
than from journal addresses. 

NOTICE 
The Social Union will give its first 
Student Whist-Smoker in the Drill 
Hall, Saturday, Jan. 21st at 6.45 p.m. 
Progressive-hid -whist will he played. 
Every student and member of the 
faculty is urged to turn out. About 
200 can be accommodated at whist. 
Those students desiring to play 
should give their names to any mem- 
ber of the Senate before Friday even- 
ing. All faculty will be accommo- 
dated. Those who do not play whist 
come around and enjoy a smoke. 



NEW 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Prof. Edward White has been oblged 
to give up his Bible class because of 
ill health. 

Mr. Thylo, secretary of the H. A. 
Dreer Co., gave a lecture Friday to 
the floriculture classes on " Floricul- 
ture Stimulated by the Amateur." 

The short course men held a mass 
meeting In the chapel Friday evening 
and proceeded to organize as a class. 
The following officers were elected: 
President, E. H. Parks; vice-presi- 
dent, A. L. Shephard; secretary and 
treasurer, T. M. Powell; sergeant at 
arms, M. E. Bragdon ; class historian, 
H. W. Ryder, class captain, R. E. 
Otis. 



TRAVELING 

TOILET SETS 

NEW STYLES 



PROFESSOR IN ANIMAL 
HUSBANDRY 

At the last meeting of the board of 
Trustees Mr. J. A. McLean was ap- 
pointed Associate Professor of Animal 
Husbandry and will begin his work at 
the beginning of the second semester. 
This appointment was made necessary 
by the resignation of Mr. R. L. Grib- 
ben, who has had charge of the work 
for the last three years, and resigned 
to go into practical farming in Iowa. 
Professor McLean received the B. A. 
degree from McMasters University, 
Toronto, in 1902, having specialized 
in Natural Science. After graduation 
he was on the instructing staff at the 
Ontario Agricultural College and then 
went to the Iowa State College for 
technical work in Animal Husbandry, 
and received the B. S. A. degree 
from that institution. He was ap- 
pointed Assistant Professor of Animal ; 
Husbandry in the Colorado Agricul- j 
tural College and served one year ! m 

before returning to the Iowa State | SliaVl tig MirrOrS. 
College as an Associate Professor in 
the same subject. Two years later 
he went to Mississippi and had charge 
of the work in Animal Husbandry in 
the Agricultural Experiment Station 
there for two years. 

Professor McLean is thoroughly 
familiar with the practical side of the 
subject, his early life having been 
spent on a stock farm in Ontario. His 
appointment and the completion of the \ 
new Animal Husbandry Building can- 
not fail to put this important branch of 
the work of the Division of Agriculture 
on a firm basis. 

Both the college and the Live Stock 
Breeders of Massachusetts are to be 
congratulated on the continued devel- 
opment of this Important department. 



THURBER'S 

COLLEGE LUNCH 



AMIIICIV.S I - . MAS! 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



CAP & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Go. 



616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 



Jewelers and Silversmiths, 



Diamond Merchants. 



Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 



SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prizes. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



NEW ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 
OF ENTOMOLOGY 

The Trustees of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College at their last meet- 
ing elected Dr. Guy Chester Cramp- 
ton of Clemson, S. C, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Entomology. Dr. Crampton 
is a native of Alabama. He gradu- 
ated from Princeton in 1904, took two 
years of graduate work at Cornell Uni- 
versity, receiving his M. A. there in 
1905, followed by two years at the 
Universities of Freiburg, Munich and 
Berlin, where he received his Ph. D. 
in 1908. He was an instructor in 
biology at Princeton from 1908 to 
1910 and since the summer of 1910 
has been professor of Zoology at Clem- 
son College. Dr. Crampton has 
studied under Professors Comstock, 
Riley, Sllngerland, and MacGillivray 
in entomology in this country, and with 
Professors Heymous, Kolbe and 
Degener abroad, besides working with 
Professors Conklin, O. Hertwig, R. 
Hertwlg, Wiedersheim, Schulte and 
Weismann in zoology. His work at 
the college will be mainly along the 
line of insect morphology and will 
greatly strengthen the department of 
entomology. It is expected that he 
will begin his work sometime In April. 

Kenyon L. Butterfield. 
Jan. 14th, 1911. 




Sanderson 
j & Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. ('. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 



— *- the country produces. 

The Kill Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 

Hatters, 

Tailors. 



C&rptrvter & Morehouse, 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



The Worthy. 

FRANK WF.BHER,M(.«. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



DEUEL'S 



Drug Store 



The Prospect House 

Good Board and 
Clean, Airy Rooms 

MRS. E. E. PERRY 

There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



Amherst Corner In Rattiskellar. 

YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



OF- 




TOBACCO 



AT 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



The College Drug Store 



RIFLE ASSOCIATION 

Under the auspices of the National 
Rifle Association of America, the inter- 
collegiate indoor rifle shooting league 
this week began a series of fifteen 
matches, with sixteen colleges repre- 
sented. The matches will continue 
weekly until April 22. The scores of 
the first week were: Massachusetts 
Agricultural College won from Rhode 
Island State college 1761 to 1430; 
Columbia University won from Cornell 
university 1809 to 1695 ; Dartmouth 
College from University of Minnesota 
1621 to 0. Minnesota having made no 
report ; Princeton University won from 
the University of California 1413 to 0, 
California having made no report; 
Lousiana State University won from 
the Uuniversity of Arizona 1462 to 
1346; University of Iowa won from 
Missouri State Military School 1870 to 
1621 ; Purdue University won from 
New Hampshire college 1642 to 1353; 
North Georgia Agricultural College and 
Washington State college made no 
reports of their match. 

A trophy to the club and silver 
I medals to individual members will be 
given for the greatest number of victor- , 
ies. A bronze figure has been donated 
as a special prize by J. A. Baker, Jr., 
and P. St. G. Bissell, Jr., two mem- 
bers of the Columbia university rifle 
team, and will be given to the non- 
military college making the best record 
in the matches. 

It will remain in competition for ten 
years and become the property of the 
team, winning it the greatest number 
of times in that period. 



PRINTER, 



No 1, Cook Plare 



Amherst. Mass. 



Established 




** 



1851 



■\h Lv 



Eimer & Amend 



205-2 U Third Ave., Cor. 1 8th St. 



New York 



Headquarters For 

Chemicals, Chemical, Physical, Bacteriological 
Apparatus and Assay Goods 

We carry the largest stock of Laboratory Supplies in the U. S. 

PROMPT SERVICE 



Our European connections are such that we are enabled to offer you 
the best service for duty-free importations on scientific supplies at the 
lowest prices. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 17, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 17, 1911. 




THEY talk about Dr. Elliot's five feet of 
books, but in this weather what one needs 
is five feet of overcoat. It's here— all 
wool, built with intelligence and honesty; a com- 
bination of hand-work, head-work and business 
enterprise. 

If you are an out-door man it's worth 
#35. to you— but our price is only $26. 

OOOLEYBROS. 

Wkstfikld, - - - Mass. 



STUDENT 

ALL THE MAGAZINES FURNITURE, 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



M. I). OILMAN. C. A. MOFFKT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealer* 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Maim Street. 

Worcestkk, Mass. 



H. W. FIELD 

... PbORIST ... 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



OPT. ACAhKMV OF MUSIC, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



GAPS and GOWNS 

« 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



THE PAST YEAR 

[Continued from pace I .] 

The legislative budget, as voted by 
the board of trustees at its meeting in 
Boston, Nov. 4, may be summarized 
as follows : 



Itema. Increase. 


Total. 


Administration. $4,250 


$25,000 


Maintenance, equipment, 43.250 


88.000 


Investigations. 5,000 


15,500 


Instruction, 22.500 


70,500 


Short courses and extension 




leaching, 15,000 


30,000 


Inspection service, 


3,000 



$90,000 $232,000 
Requests for appropriations for spec- 
ial purposes, 1911: 

Improvements, west experiment sta- 
tion building, $7,500 
Enlargement Draper hall. 25,000 
Dormitory, 20,000 
Dairy building and equipment, 75,000 
Department equipment, 15,000 
Repairs. 20,000 
General improvaments, 25,000 

$187,500 
REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

The treasurer's report for the year 
ending Nov. 30, shows a year of great- 
est activity since the founding of the 
institution. The current expenses of 
the college proper have been $182,- 
693.14. The receipts were $193, 
029.03. This leaves a credit balance 
of $10,335.89 In the year's work. 
The experiment station disbursements 
were $61,674.64. The receipts were 
$60,791 .90. This shows an increase 
of the expenditures of $872.74 over 
the receipts. However, they started 
the year with a balance of $6,682.68. 
There has been expended on account 
of special appropriations $121,927.59. 
This is divided principally between the 
zoology building, $50,380.72; animal 
husbandry building, $4166.35; labor- 
atory for pomology, $1223.38; land, 
$18,172.92; replacing barns, $13,- 
689.04; repairs and improvements, 
$25,273.99; teaching and office 
equipment, $8722.85. The inventory 
for the whole institution is valued at 
$883,222.64. This is divided as 
follows: — 

Land, $67,656.24 

College buildings. 489,900.60 

College equipment, 236,709.38 

Experiment station buildings, 29,850 00 

Experiment station equipment, 59,106.42 

This is an increase of $128,284.82 
over the inventory of a year ago. The 
principal increases are in the land, 
which has increased $18,000; college 
buildings, which have increased $88,- 
000 college equipment, which has 
increased $22,000. 

The division of agriculture has had 
a very prosperous year. The net cost 
of the agricultural division to the col- 
lege has been $6185.14. An inven- 
tory of the produce, cattle, swine, 
horses and equipment of the division, 
purchased from current funds, shows 
that they have increased in value 
$4112.59 over a year ago. This 
would mean that the net cost of the 
division to the college has been only 
about $2072.55, which is the best 




.(DflH, 



ffi 






A GOOD THING 



It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E. M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



Clapp, '12. 



Heers, '12. 



We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASKMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



>E. N. PARISEAU,.* 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON 



RAZORS HONKI) 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. MAGRATH & SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



showing that it has ever made. An your profession, your games unless 
inventory of the cattle shows $10,042; you have team-work. It is the same 
of the horses, $4400; of the produce in college as it is in life ; show me a 
on hand, $5000. The horticultural ' college where the frindship between 
division has made a very creditable I the men is cold and I will show you 
showing. The total division receipts a college where the spirit is of the 
have been $7428.98; bills receivable, lowest order. 

$883.70; apportionment, $7100; This is an age of interdependence, 
total division disbursements, $13.- There are plenty of men who will help 
890.57; bills payable, $122.93; un- put a man down, but th re are not 
expended balance, $1399. 18. A year enough men who will help him to get 
ago this balance showed $236.38, an j on his feet again. Every time an in- 
increase of over $1 150. An inventory j dividual in a community cheapens 
of the produce on hand, compared 1 himself he cheapens the whole com- 
with a year ago, makes an increase of j munity. We have no such thing as 
$85.60. The trust funds held by the j independence. When we see weak- 
institution show an inventory value of | ness anywhere, it is our business to 



$41,100. There has been received 
from the late Dr. John C. Cutter of 
Worcester a bequest of $1000. The 
income from this fund is to be used to 
purchase books for the college library 
on hygiene. 



brace it up. Each for all and all for 
each, should be our motto. Link 
yourselves to-gether for yourselves and 
for the prestige of your institution and 
play the game fair." 



FIRST SMOKER 

[Continued from first page) 

any sport, and anyone who wants to 
succeed must respect the rules. It is 
true that there are fouls in every walk 
of life. Some are accidents, some 
are not, some men play foul in all 
times of life. You will never cease to 
regret any foul play. Let's be able 
to stand on our feet confronting the 
world without dishonor and make a 
success. 

It is not manly to get, simply for the 
purpose of getting. It is a great thing 
to have a large store of riches and 
resources, but it is still a greater thing 
to distribute this store among the 
needy. Andrew Carnegie, no boubt 
enjoyed himself immensely in accumu- 
lating his enormous wealth, but now 
he is having the time of his life in 
simply passing it on. The great ob- 
ject of your getting is in passing it on. 
I want, therefore, that you should 
consider distribution &z one of the 
sides of the triangle. We are get- 
ting, in order that we may make the 
world better by distributing whatever 
we get. It is a great thing to know 
how to distribute. Learn to distrib- 
ute fairly ; learn to give the best you 
have and don't let the fact that you 
have done a fine thing, be a surprise 
to any one. Remember that the best 
of distribution is giving back some- 
thing that costs— something that re- 
quired a sacrifice on your part to at- 
tain. Every day the mothers and 
fathers of some of you are giving up 
something in order that you may have 
a college education. It is up to you 
to pay back what you owe them. 
Down in Panama we are digging a 
canal to unite the two oceans. We 
want to dig canals from our stores of 
resources to the great ocean of con- 
structive force 



SUNDAY VESPERS 

[Continued from page I .] 

wound. Have strong convictions and 
be able to sacrifice, but be peaceable. 
The morally strong man is firm, but 
gentle. How shall we grasp this 
marvellous synthesis of seemingly 
opposite qualities ? Faith in God will 
make us broad enough to combine 
both of these characteristics. We 
must combine conviction with gentle- 
ness, firmness with sympathy. Be a 
Christian so plainly that you can say 
you are such. Get a grip upon a real 
faith in God. This will make yon 
capable of serving others. 

WESTERN ALUMNI BANQUET 

[Continued from first pate.' 

beneficial than work In which one had 
specialized, and the feeling most dom- 
inant was that the agricultural college 
produces better and broader minded 
business men than technical institutions. 

During the banquet and well inter- 
mingled with the toasts, were college 
songs, sung by the Lexington quartet, 
an exceptionally clever group of sing- 
ers, who greatly enlivened the meeting. 

As a grand finale, the college song 
was sung, followed by the long college 
yell, led by Damon '10. for M. A. C. 
and for Mr. Howe. 

Those present were: El'mer D. 
Howe '81, guest and representative 
from the college, L. A. Nichols '71, 
E, B. Bragg '75, A. F. Shivenck 
'82, C. F. W. Felt '86. A B. Smith 
'95, P. C. Brook '01. M. H. West 
'03, C. A. Tirrell '06. W. A. Cum- 
mings '08, A. L. Whiting '08, H. G. 
Noble '09 and E. F. Damon '10. 

The following officers were elected 
for the ensuing year: M. H. West 
'03. president; A. F. Shiverick '82. 
vice-president; Charles A. Tirrell '06, 
secretary and treasurer. 



44 



PROF. STOCK 



ft 



Ami the siiiKlt- Klenif ill llot-t rim-. 

Professor Stockbridge had BO patience with so-called single 
element doctrine, which depends for ita aucceea <>n the potential 

fertility — no patience with the tanner who was trying to tind out for 
himself if he could leave out any one of the three leading element! 
of plant nutrition (nitrogen, potash and phosphoric acid), or how 
little of each he could get along with. That was a proper subject 
for the scientific worker to investigate hut until he knew more 
about it, the practical farmer, who had his living to make and 
his bills to pay, should not tinker with it. To Stockbridge it 
meant, in the end. improvident farming. At best, the farmer had 
to take great chances, especially with the weather, the largest 

factor in crop raising, over which he had no control, but lie 
should take no chances with the tilings which he could control. 
AflBOBf these were the amount and kind of manure which hr an 
plied to his crops. Tluis, if he hoped foi a stated < lop he should 
it least fertilize intelligently for that crop. Foi the man who was 
dependent on his crops any other course was unwise. Moreover, 
any other course would leave the soil machine in a poorer comli 
lion than lie found it. Broadly speaking, to encourage liini to 
take out more than lie put hack was not only had econom\, but 
bad morals, and should be dtsCOtSfagtd, lot in the end it would 
lead to irop bankruptcy. 

" Stu,/\ the plant footi problem. " 

Fertilizer Company 



BOWKER 



43 Chatham St. Boston 



I. RE. LABROVITZ 



THE 



Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits and Overcoats To Order 
Always a large and select line of Foreign and Domestic Woolens. 

Dyeing, Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing a Specialty 

A guaranteed fit in .ill the latest kinds of garments. 

Renovated Suits Kor Sale. 

A first class line of dent's Furnishing Goods always on hand. K. & VY. 

Collars and Dress Shirts. Satisfaction guaranteed in every transn lion 



1 1 Amity Street, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Tel. 303-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



FRESHMAN BASEBALL MANA 
CER ELECTED 



Right coordination or team work is Last Tuesday the Freshmen had a 
what we need in the world to-day. | very close election for their baseball 
The day of individualism has passed, j manager. The votes cast stand in 
and team-work now lies on the hori- following order : 

zon of modern demand. You will ! Bittinger 31 .Higgins 30, Shirley 16, 
never find success in your business, I Wheeler 20, Bokelund 13. 



Dance Programs 








[ >V 










Fraternity 


and 














and 


Invitations 














< lass Inserts 


Menus 


















for Annuals 


Leather Dance 
Cases and 




(1 


]| 


h 








Fraternity 
and Class 


Covers 


"g 




\ 






Calling 


Cards 


Stationery 


Wedd 


Invitations and 





1MIOTOGKAVUHRK 

WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 17, 1911. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 17, if it 



•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•....•.•.•.•••.•.■.•.•.•.•.•.•.•,.•.•..•.•.•.•.•.• 



GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 








THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 



FOR 1-' YKARS OFFICIAL 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



AT WILLIAMS COLLKGK 



Has just opened an up-to-date and thoroughly equipped 
Studio for high grade work, in the 

NASH BLOCK, MAIN STPCCT, HMHCB5T 

Where absolute satisfaction is guaranteed every customer. 
All styles, up-to-date and prices reasonable. 



INITIATION BANQUETS 

The following initiation banquets 
were held last week: 

Kappa Sigma at the Prospect House, 
Friday evening. 

Beta Kappa Phi, at the Amherst 
House, Friday evening at eight 
o'clock. 

Theta Phi at The Draper, North- 
ampton, Friday evening at eight o'clock. 

Kappa Gamma Phi at the Amherst 
House Saturday evening at eight-thirty 
o'clock. 

Sigma Tau Delta at the Prospect 
House Saturday evening at eight 
o'clock. 

Phi Sigma Kappa at the Draper 
Northampton Saturday evening at 
eight o'clock. A number of visiting 
delegates were present. 

DRAMATIC READING CONTEST 

The special contest in Dramatic 
Reading will be held at Assembly on 
Jan. 25th. The preliminaries will 
occur on Wednesday and Thursday 
evenings of this week. Jan. 18th and 
19th, at 8-00 o'clock in the Public 
Speaking room. The following assign- 
ment of contestants is made : Wednes- 
day evening — Read, Wells, Foster, 
i Simmons, Griggs, French, Chun and 
Jordan; Thursday evening — Freed- 
man, Guild, Baker, Barsfow, Blake 
and Zabriskie. Three contestants will 
be selected from the first contest and 
two from the second. These five 
contestants will compete on Jan. 25th. 
The first prize will be a ten dollar gold 
piece, the second prize a five-dollar 
gold piece. 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE 0L0 CORNER DRUB STORE. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass 



The place to have your group and single pictures taken correctly. Call 
«md make your appointments. Visitors welcome. 



STKAM FITTING, Telephone 59~ 4- 

OAS PITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lkad Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 
Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, - Mass. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Opfick Hours: 

StO 1UA.M. I.HOtn.-.l'.M. 



KAPPA SIGMA DANCE 

More than thirty members of the 
Kappa Sigma fraternity attended a 
dance held at the Odd Fellows' hall 
Saturday afternoon and evening. 
Delegates from the Vermont, New 
Hampshire, Dartmouth and Harvard 
chapters were present. Dancing lasted 
from four until nine. Music was fur- 
nished by a stringed orchestra. Sup- 
per was served early in the evening by 
the Gold Dust twins. The patronesses 
were Mrs. Foord. Mrs. Lockwood, 
Mrs. Wellington, Mrs. Waugh and 
Mrs. White. 



Wright 
& Ditson 

Football and Basketball suits 
the standard at all fading 
colleges. 'The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
( iuards the best and most pract- 
ical also Skates and Hockey 
Goods. The Wright & Dit- 
son Sweaters have 
long been recognized 
as the best. 



-i 1 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



Olvmpia Candv Co. 



257 Main St., 
Northampton, 



Mass. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



POMOLOGY DEPARTMENT 
TALK 

Thursday night Professor Jarvis of 
Storrs, Conn., gave a very interesting 
illustrated lecture in French Hall, to 
not only the short course men but to 
all students of the college who cared 
to attend. His subject was "The 
Renovation of Old Apple Orchards." 
That the men were interested in the 
subject was attested by the fact that 
that the hail was crowded. 

He dealt chiefly with the small 
orchards of about ten acres which are 
often found in New England. Among 
the problems and the requirements to 
which he gave his attention were the 
forming of a new head on an old body, 
the use of fillers, pruning, spraying, 
and fertilization. Particular mention 
was made of the work of Mr. George 
Drew and Of the Connecticut College 
I along these lines. 



College Students and Athletes 

C^feSS*- who want the real, superior 

■ca. <^ articles for the different sports 

u.» ..», or, should g«-t the kind that beat 

our trade-mark. Catalogue J ree. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass 

2: Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cai 

76 Weybosset Street, Providence, R. 1 

Harvard Square. Cambridge. Mass. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. W. ISIaney, '11 
C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, E. L. Winn, 87 
Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursday 
Delivers Thursdays and Saturd u 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
( arnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Hldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only J rom 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Great River Water Power Go. 

/ .1.&-S.A. ALLEN, ?r*ps 

Office, Gillett Block. 

WESTFIED, MASS. 



/?OOMS WITH HEAT, 
POWER <£ LIGHT 

FOR ** K N T 



BALED SHAVINGS 

put up in attractive shape. 

in car lots. 

PRICE ON APPLICATION 



FRANK S. O'BRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND hACK 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 

8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, • • MASS. 

Telephone 



SOPHOMORE ELECTIONS 

Last Tuesday evening a business 
meeting was called by the president of 
the sophomore class. A report was 
rendered to the class regarding the 
awarding of numerals for baseball and 
football during the past year. The 
following managers of class athletic 
teams were elected : Hockey, Wlllard 
S. Little; baseball, H. E. Goodnough. 
The track manager, E. H. Cooper, 
was previously elected. Three mem- 
bers of the Sophomore-Senior Prom- 
enade Committee were also elected as 
follows: H. T. Roe'nrs, George Za- 
briskie, and C. A. Shute. 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES. 

Horticultural 6, (Catalog, p. 56) 
will not be given in 1910-11. Stu- 
dents wishing to take plant breeding 
are recommended to elect Agronomy 4. 

The substance of Landscape Gard- 
ening 6 will be changed for 1910-11, 
so that instead of being an elementary 
course without prerequisites, it will be 
a more advanced course especially ad- 
dapted to seniors specializing in land- 
scape gardening. It will treat of archi- 
tecture in its relation to landscape 
gardening. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

M. A. C. CLUB OF WASHINGTON, D. C. 

The 1911 annual dinner of the club 
will be held at the Cosmos club, 1520 
H. Street, Washington, D. C., Sat- 
urday, Jan. 28, at 6 P. m. President 
Butterfield is expected to be present 
and we hope for the best meeting of 
years. 

C. H. Griffin, Secretary. 

Northampton, Jan. 12,1911. 

Will you be ready for the trip to 
the beaches of Southern Texas, 
through orange groves and fig orchards 
on to the irrigated farms of the South- 
west and on to old Mexico? Trip 
starts Feb 6th tickets between $60 and 
$65 dollars round trip. Sleeper about 
a dollar a day. Trip 12 to 16 days. 
Extension tickets may be had. Excel- 
lent service. Best trains. Reply at 
once. Regular fare one way over 
$100 Special car all the way. We 
must notify railroad by the 25th. 
Yours truly, 
H. D. Hemenway. 

Adjourned annual meeting of the 
M. A. C. Club of New York, Saturday 
evening Feb, 4th, at the St. Denis 
Hotel, Broadway and Eleventh Street, 
to amend by-laws, elect officers and 
transact such other business as may 
come before said meeting. 

No formal speaking, but an unusual 
opportunity for Aggie fellowship. 
Evening clothes unnecessary; will sit 
down to dinner at half-past six o'clock; 
seats will be reserved for those remit- 
ting ; tickets, two dollars. 
By order of the Executive Committee, 
John A. Cutter, M.D. '82, Sec. 
Jan. 10, 191 1. 

N. B. — The above notice is mailed 
to those who have already attended the 
New York reunions ; the expense of 
notifying all graduate and non-graduate 
alumni which occurs in the propaganda 
for the annual reunion is herewith elim- 
inated; all to whom this notice by 
courtesy of the Signal may come. 
we will be very glad to have with us. 
—J. A. C. 



■■■I I • '■■■ ' •*■ ' — -i 



FATIMA 






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With each package of 
hall ma you gel a ben- 
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which secure it hand- 
some ftl, colled- pen- 
nant (12x32)— stltx* 
Men of 1 00. 



^TURKISH 

13 BLEND 

CIGARETTES 

PSYCHOLOGY 

The brain is a complex 
organism with many mar- 
velous attributes. 

Memory is one of them — hence do 
not forgft Fatimaa. 

Thought is another — think of their 
goodness, their distinctive individu- 
ality. 

Intelligence— the master thought 
is what we use in blending such rare 
tobacco*. 

And Reason, well, thty appeal 
to you because you cannot reason 
any other cigarette so satisfying and 
enjoyable. College men say they're 
"different" — and they know. 

20 for I 5 cts. — in a plain package 
— and you get ten additional. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 



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wm 




Gold Medal Corn 

The Only Gold Medal 

Gives at the (irand New England Corn Im- 
position held at Worcester,. Mass., Nov. 7th to 
1 2th, was awarded to Hon. Theodore C. Bates 

For CROP and for EXHIBIT 

Those who visited the Corn Exposition will recall the (ireat Pyramid and 
(ireat Cone of Corn near the entrance. 

There mere 3,000 Perfect Ears of Corn on the Cone 

none of them less than 12 inches long. 

There mere 2,000 Perfect Ears of Corn on the Pyramid 

from 12 i-2 to 14 inches long. 

On One Acre of Flint Corn Mr. Bates Raised One Hundred Seventy - 
Three and Three-Tenths (173.3) Bushels of Ears, Weighing 70 Hounds 
to the Bushel. 

Allowing 4j per cent for moisture and cob, and reducing to 12 per cent 
moisture basis (average moisture in crib dry corn) we find that Mr. Hates 
produced 

One Hundred Forty and Three-Tenths (140.3) Bushels of Shelled 
Corn per Acre ; 56 pounds of shelled corn to the bushel. 

The yield was certified by three competent men as sworn to by them before 
the clerk of the courts at Worcester. 

The Worcester Magazine says : 

" The Authorities at the Corn Show give this Yield the Credit of 
Excelling any Record of Flint Corn In this Country." 

Truly a wonderful tribute to Mr. Bates' skill as a farmer, to New Kngland 
Soil, and to 

PERUVIAN VEGETABLE GROWER 

with which this remarkable crop was raised. 

MANUKAC TUKEI) ONLY MY 

THE COE MORTIMER CO 

Sole Manufacturers of E. h rank Coe Fertilizers 
and Peruvian Brands, Special Importers of Genu- 
ine Thomas Phosphate Powder. 

24-26 Stone St., New York City. 

If you have not received a copy of our handsome 
Annual Memorandum book we shall be glad to 
send you one if you mention the College Signal. 




The College Signal, Tuesday, January 17, 1911. 



pi. J. Lapoile, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



BUT0-L1VERY HORSE 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 183. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Has started on its forty-third year ; total enrollment of four year men to 

date is over 375. 

The College announces for the first time, a course in 

FORESTRY, 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 

Ward's Fountain Tens, Fine Papers 
and Knvelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kngraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
KaiKjuet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

X\T<* rA 'c 57 " 63 Franklin Street ' 
VVttlU O BOSTON. 



ALL OF THE 



This will consist of lectures and field exercises ; the course .s open to juniors 
and seniors only. More advanced courses will be offered in the second 
term of this year. The numerous courses offered in Botany, Entomology, 
Chemistry, and Landscape Gardening afford a splendid fundamental train- 
ing for a person planning to follow Forestry as a profession. 

For a complete catalog or specific information, address 

Kknyon L. Huitkkhkld, President. 



Allen Bros. 

Contractors & Builders. 
Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



VARSITY MEN The **«. s<««.. 

Athletic Board, 
Football Association, 
Baseball Association, 
Track Association, 
Hockey Association, 
Tennis Association, 
Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 
Y. M. C. A., 
Fraternity Conference, 
Musical Association, 
Stockbridge Club, 
i Rifle Club, 
M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 
Debating Society, 
Public Speaking Council, 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



and most of the upperclassmen 
wear 

HAND KNIT 



Shaker Sweaters 



111 EKE IS A REASON. 



H. W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill, President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

E. Dudley, Jr., President 

R. C. Barrows, President 

I. C. Gilgore, President 



Amherst, Mass. 

F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



J- 



When Fitting Out Your Room 



AMHERST. MASS. 

COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyking, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTMM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



1 nw vkdi m isCN.fi Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 
a«;knteor Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



CARS 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



AT M. A. C. 



BASSALOTTI & GENTASO 



JACKSON &f CUTLER 



FRUIT. 



CONFECTIONERY, 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

H KICKS TO TAKE HOMh. 

COBNBD AMITY & PLEASANT STREETS 

JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 

Boot & Shoes Repaired 

FIRST CLASS WORK 

Amherst, - Mass. 

BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 




THE H. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 

Landscape Foresters ani Entomologists 

STAMFORD, CONN. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Leave AOQIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AUUIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mim. paat each 
HOUR. 

Special Car* at Reasonable Kate* 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



MANUFACTURERS of 



M 



Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, $2. Wetkly, %i> 




r% 



OLLEGE 



JAN 30 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 




Vol. XXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 24, 191 »• 



No. 15 



HOCKEY 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute De- 
feated by Overwhelming Score. 

The M. A. C. hockey team had an 
easy time defeating the seven of the 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at 
the Empire Curling rink last Friday 
night by a score of 13 to 1. The 
game was marked by much roughness, 
both teams resorting to tripping tactics 
trom the start. The team work of M. 
A. C. featured the contest. 

At no time during the struggle did 
the Trojans have a chance to win, being 
outclassed from the time the contest 
started. Our boys scored at will and 
the contest was too one-sided to be 
interesting. 

The teams line-up as follows: 

r. p. 1: 



SUNDAY VESPERS INTERCOLLEGIATE SHOOTING 



HOCKEY 



M. A, C. 

Ackerman. g 
Adams (Cabt.) p 
Needham. cp 
Jones r 
Woolley, rw 
Peckham, Iw 
Huchinson.c 



g, Thompson 

p, Berger 

cp. Higbee 

r, Norton 

rw. Stevens (Capt.) 

Iw. Page 

c. Reynolds 



Rev. Clarence E. Swift of Fall River 
Leads the Service. 

"The Power of Endless Life" was 
the subject of the address by Rev. 
Clarence E. Swift of Fall River. 

He said. "Jesus came to His high 
office because of a certain original, 
Indwelling life, the endless life. The 
purpose of certain portions of the 
Scriptures Is to put a new interpreta- 
tion of the value of life. The value 
of endless life to children and to men 
is that endless life has its message to 
the believing one that Christ is forever 
with us. The endless life of Christ is 
a proof that He can be with us. 

There was a time when endless life 
was considered as in a realm by itself. 
Today, philosophy and science are 
opening their doors to any proof of the 
possibility of endless life. The prac- 
tical assurance of this endless life is in 

His life. 

What is the value to ourselves of 
our own endless lives? What does 
earth gain afler all from its vision of 
what is to come in the endless lives of 
human beings? What to us Is the 
power of our own endless life? 



M. A. C. Again the Winner. Arizona Strong Louden Field Club Defeated by 
Defeated. a Small Margin. Score 5 to 4. 

The highest score of the week's Our hockey team defeated 



THE DAIRY DEPARTMENT 

There are 32 men taking the short 
winter course in dairying. Only 22 of 
this number are able to get the prac- endless life meana contrast in circum 
tical training in our dairy room. The I stances of one aspect and comple- 
other 10 are obliged to study the theo-tlon in character from another. 



matches was made by Columbia. 
The results of the week's matches. 
Columbia defeated Dartmouth, 1859 

to 1570. 

Iowa beat New Hampshire, 1855 to 

1531. 

M. A. C 

to 1511. 

Princeton defeated Minnesota, 1609 

to (by default). 

Louisiana defeated California, 1448 
to (by default;. 

Purdue won from North Georgia 
"Aggies," 1642 to 1356. 

Cornell defeated Washington State, 
1766 to 1758. 

Missouri State won from Rhode 
Island, 1730 to 1675. 

The score for the first week, ending 
Jan. 14th, was the third highest made, 
Iowa State and Columbia beating us. 
The official individual scores were : 

Standing Prone Total 



retical part of the course only. There 
is no room to accommodate them. 
Eighty men would have been registered 
in dairy class if they could have been 
accommodated. 

There are six cream separators, 
namely the following: two Sharpies 
separators, one Daisy Maid Cream 



the times of the Old Testament it was 

the first. 

There are circumstances in which 
Heaven appeals to us as different as 
possible from earth. The power of 
the vision of our endless lives is to give 
us freedom of spirit In circumstances. 
Man can't be a slave if he has a 



reparaloTma'de bv'The" I nternational | vision of a bright future That a 
Harvester Company, one Improved \ thrall in person may be free in sp.rU 
„ has been demonstrated n every form 

United States Cream separator, made h« been cie J 



by the Vermont Farm Machinery Com- 
pany, and two De Laval separators No. 
9 aud No. 15. Five of these are new 
this year. 

There are five or six butter-churns 
and almost every other convenience 
that one finds in -the modern dairy, 
except the room. 



SIGNAL COMPETITION 

STUDY UP TO JAN. 21st, 1911 

Carpenter 19.57^ 
Williams 19.51 I 
Harlow 13.26 {1912. 
Hutchins 4.75 J 
Zabriskie 24.16 ) , 913 
Anderson 14. 10 \ 

Clark 10.62 "| 
Foster 10.30 
Wheeler 8. 15 
Allbee 4.90 
Damon 4.86 
Simmons 3. 12 J 



J-1914. 



Dalton ' 1 2. has been elected head of 
the Navy eleven for next year. 



and condition of human life. The 
endless life is a bright future which is 
looked forward to and which helps all. 
Man or child may become free when 
visions are of a future city builded by 
God. Cripples, orphans, ruined men 
have you seen with their faces lighted 
up, lighted up because of that future 
endless life. 

The vision of endless life is brighter 
when viewed on the side of character. 
This mortal life is but one chapter. 
There is a continuing factor, the undy- 
ing personality, character, individual- 
ity. The body dies; but the self is 
'there, personality is there. What we 
are in the endless life depends upon 
what we are here, that other part of 
our lives being a logical conclusion of 
what our lives are here. It Is an 
awful yet comforting thought. I be- 
lieve the big reason for honesty here 
in college is for honesty afterwards in 



1. Baker, H. J. 

2. Brett. A. C. 

3. Edminister. A. F. 

4. Floyd, E. R. 

5. McLaughlin, F. A 

6. Racicot, P. A. 

7. Robinson, R. C. 
8 Sharpe, A. H. 
9. Stevenson, L. O. 

10. Wilde. E. 1. 



Louden Field Club seven at the Empire 
Curling rink last Saturday night by the 
narrow margin of one point, being on 
the long end of a 5 to 4 score. At 
the end of the second half the score 
was tied with four goals each and the 
defeated Ar.zona, 181 3 1 captains decided to play an extra 

period of five minutes. Hutchinson 
scoring the winning goal after four 
minutes had passed. 

The game was marred somewhat, 
by the rough playing of both teams; 
occasionally two men being off the Ice 
at the same time. The passing of 
both teams was exceptionally good. and 
but for the remarkable defense work 
of the points and covers the score 
would have been larger. 

On the face-off, the puck was shot 
into our territory and the club forwards 
kept it there for about four minutes, 
when our team carried It out of danger 
by clever passing. Hutchinson 
received a pass near the Field Club 
goal and shot it into the netting for the 
first score of the game. Peckham 
added another to the Massachusetts 
score seven minutes later, after the 
disc had been shot up and down th^ 
rink. Hutchinson made a goal a few 
minutes later, when he picked the 
puck out of a scrimmage and sent it 
flying into the cage. MacCormack 
brought hope to the Field Club support- 
ers, when he scored a goal on a sensa- 
tional shot from the centre of the rink. 
For the rest of the half the puck was 
kept in our territory, but the good work 
by Ackerman as goal-tender kept all 
of the Field Club's forwards' shots out 
of the netting, with the exception of 
one by Stanley. 

Stanley tied the score five minutes 
after the beginning of the second half 
after he had carried the puck from the 
centre of the rink, eluding his oppon- 
ents in clever fashion. The disc see- 
sawed up and down the rink for over 
five minutes before our boys carried it 
from the centre to near the Field 
club's goal. Then Jones slipped it past 



1. Baker, H. J. 
2 Edminister. A F. 
3. Johnson, B. P. 
7. Lloyd, E. A «^» 

5. McLaughlin, F. A. 

6. Racicot. P. A 

7. Sharpe. A. H. 

8. Stevenson, L. O. 

9. Walker, H. C. 
10. Wilde, E. I. 

821 940 1761 
The score for the week ending Jan. 
21st, 1911, was 1813, made against 
the University of Arizona. The offi- 
cial individual scores were : 



77 


96 


173 


88 


86 


174 


74 


85 


159 


87 


9 V 


184 


82 


99 


18! 


80 


94 


174 


87 


100 


187 


74 


93 


167 


90 


97 


187 


82 


93 


175 




_. 


■ 



Sunning Prone Total 



87 

89 

87 

88 

79 

85 

87 

96 

86 

82 



95 
95 
95 
95 
100 
96 
91 
96 
91 
93 



182 
184 
182 
183 
179 
181 
178 
192 
177 
175 



1813 
was 



866 947 
The third week's shooting 
against the University of California. 
Although there were two entirely new 

men McDougall '13and Murray '14, French and placed M. A.C. in the lead 

the work of the team was better than I again. So quickly did the Field Club 

before The unofficial scores were: j tie the score that the spectators could 

standin. Prone tou. hardly realize what had taken place. 

,86 i Wheeler lost the puck on the next 

169 ! face-off, but promptly recovered It and 

\ 7 q 9 ' sent It flying past our defense into the 

184 1 netting. It was the most spectacular 

187 play of the game, and one, the dupli- 

193 cate f which will not be seen in 

170 Albany ior sometime. For the remain- 

!~ ing nine minutes neither team 



1. Baker, H.J. 

2. Edminister, A. F. 

3. Lloyd. E. R. 

4. McDougall, A. F. 

5. McLaughlin, F. A. 

6. Murray, J. K. 

7. Racicot, P. A. 

8. Robinson. R. C. 

9. Sharpe, A. H. 
10. Stevenson, L. O. 



90 
80 
82 
93 
88 
93 
95 
78 
97 
78 



96 
89 
97 
96 
96 
94 
98 
92 
100 
93 



(Continual on page 4.] 



874 951 1825 



[Continued on pat* *1 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 24, 19' * 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 24, 191 1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 
EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, EdItor-tn-Chtof. 

HAROLD F. WILLARD. 1911. Managing Editor. 
IRVING W. DAVIS, 1911. Alumni Notet. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY, 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYALN.HALLOWELL.1912. Assistant Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912. College Notes. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Department Notes. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
PARK W. ALLEN, 191 1. Business Manager. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1 9 1 2, Asst. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN. Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Pee* Office. 

Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, JAN. 24. No 15. 



CALENDAR 



Jan 



Jan 



The subject of the communication 
in this issue calls for a word of com- 
ment. That the campus of our col- 
lege is beautiful is not to be denied, 
and though in the past there has been 
no definite plan for development, nor 
a sufficient appropriation to carry out 
improvements, now that the depart- 
ment of Landscape Gardening has the 
care of the campus, we can surely 
look for changes. Even yet. the funds 
for proper treatment are lacking, so 
the assistance of each student is re- 
quested. Simply a little thoughtful- 
ness on the student's part will aid in 
keeping the campus neat and tidy. 
Do not litter the campus with refuse; 
proper receptacles are provided for 
such matter. Under the direction of 
the Landscape Department affairs will 
assume a different attitude and not 
only will the campus be kept beautiful 
but it will be made even more attract- 
ive than it now is. 



[Notices for this column should be dropped In the 
Siohal Office or handed to E. M. Brown 1 1 , on or 
before the Saturday precedlnc each issue. J 

24—7-00 p. m., Stockbridge club 
in Agricultural recitation room. 
7-00 p. m,, Glee club rehearsal 
in chapel. 

7-15 p. m.. Junior Landscape 
club In Wilder hall. 
25—3-30 p. M., Dramatic Read- 
ing contest in chapel. 
7-00 p. m., Debating club in 
Public speaking room. 
7-00 P. m., Mandolin club 
rehearsal in chapel. 
Jan. 26—3-30 p. m., Hockey. Mass- 
achusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy on college lake. 
6-45 p. m., Y. M. C. A. in 
chapel. 
28—3-00 p. m.. Hockey, Spring- 
field Training school at Spring- 
field. 

7-30 p. m., Social Union enter- 
tainment to be announced. 
Jan. 30—8-00 a. m., Final exams, 
begin. 



UP -TO- DATE 



w 



P UMPS 

ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 

TENNIS SHOES 

EXPERT REPAIRING 



Jan. 



The mission of Social Union is cer- 
tainly being fulfilled by the interesting 
and varied line of entertainments 
which it is giving. Never before has 
such a thing as a college smoker been 
held; neither has a college progressive 
whist party ever been given. Speak- 
ers of reputation, dramatic readers, 
and companies of players have their 
place in the series of entertainments 
but those which afford an entirely new 
nature are those given on the last two 
Saturday evenings. The purpose of 
providing a reason and means for as- 
sembling and then a chance for 
becoming better acquainted with all 
friends of the institution, but particu- 
larly those in it, is the object of the 
Union. Informal gatherings attain 
these ends with more success than do 
the formal chapel gatherings and the 
idea of appealing to a man's personal 
nature is stronger than that of his 
moral nature. So while the talks 
have a beneficial affect and one which 
could not otherwise be supplied yet the 
smokers appeal to more and in a man- 
ner which could also be carried out In 
no other way. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

The schedule of finals has been 
posted in North college. 

Mr. Norman led the Y. M. C. A. 
meeting Thursday evening. 

S. B. Freeborn of Ware went home 
last Tuesday, taken suddenly ill with 

grippe. 

Two initiation banquets were held 
Friday evening; Q. T. V. at the 
Amherst house and C. S. C. at The 
Draper, Northampton. 

Dr. P. L. Reynolds officiated as 
referee and diving judge at the Am- 
herst College Inter-Class Swimming 
meet held in the Pratt Gymnasium 
Saturday afternoon. 

On Feb. 1 1th, the relay team will 
meet Worcester Tech at the B. A. A. 
meet in Mechanics Building in Bos- 
ton. Manager Piper also states that 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full lint of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



THURBER'S 

COLLEGE LUNCH 

AMHKMMT, IVtAflM*. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 



material will be 



TRAVELING 

TOILET SETS 






Makers 
of 



other promising 
entered, 

Friday the Track association starts 
to Providence, R. 1. to enter in a dual \ 
meet with Rhode Island State college, 
to be held Saturday in the armory, i 
The relay team, 1000 yds., and three | 
mile events will be run. 

Tuesday night, Jan. 17th, the band: 
played at the Ice Carnival given by 
the girls of Mount Holyoke college, j 
It was an ideal night— the full moon, 
the bright stars, and the good playing of 
the band made an enjoyable evening 

for all. 

INUI— JAPANESE ORATOR 
Mr. Kiyo S. Inui, a young Japanese 
j orator, graduate of the University of 
! Michigan, will give a live talk on an 
I interesting Oriental topic as the enter- 
tainment for next Saturday evening in 
the Social Union series. This enter- 
tainment will be an informal smoker 
which all men connected with the 
college are urged to attend. In the 
Union Room, North College. Saturday, 
I Jan. 28th at 6-45 o'clock. 



NEW STYLES 



Shaving Mirrors. 



CAP & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



The Prospect House 

Good Board and 
Clean, Airy Rooms 

MRS. E. E. PERRY 



DEUELS 



Drug Store 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Co. 



616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 



Jewelers and Silversmiths, 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



or 



Diamond Merchants. 



Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 



SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prizes. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.*. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



The Worthy 

FRANK WEBBER, Mf.R. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



AmhrrMt Corner in RathskHlar. 

YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



WEDNESDAY NIGHT LECTURE 
IN THE CHAPEL. 

Last Wednesday night, in the 
ehapel, Mr. Wilfred Wheeler of Con- 
cord. Mass., a successful, practical 
fruit grower and market gardener, gave 
an intensely interesting talk on "Some 
Observations in Massachusetts Or- 
chards." 

During his frequent trips throughout 
the state, he has been particularly 
struck by the immense quantity of 
available land for orchards, the greater 
part of which may be bought from 
$15 to $25 per acre. He believes 
that North Middlesex County Is the 
best part of the state for well-shaped, 
good-colored, and sound fruit. He 
recommends this section to all men 
who intend to take up apple-growing 
in this state. 

He set forth some of the faults peo- 
ple make in laying out and planting 
young orchards. 

1 . The alignment of rows and lay- 
ing (poorly done in nine out of ten 
cases), This Is a very general fault. 

2. Trees are planted a little too 
deep. Very often two or three In- 
ches deeper than when planted in the 
narrow rows. 

3. Poor Drevious preparation of 
the land. This is by far worst of all. 
An ideal preparation should take at 
least three years. 

4. In a great many cases, fill-in 
crops are planted too close to the trees. 

5. Pruning is oftentimes overdone 
or underdone. A great many trees 
are headed too high. 

The art of growing and caring for 
trees is to know just when to do a 
thing and when not to. We need 
more trained men in the business to 
get the best results. 

We praise F. A. Smith, a graduate 
of M. A. C, for his thorough orchard 
intelligence and for his splendid orchard 
at Turner Hill, which won first prize in 
the state contest for good orchards. 

We have got to fertilize along lines 
for color and quality, as well as for the 
growing of the trees. Let us become 
trained orchardists in the truest sense 
of the word, like Mr. Smith of M. A. 
C.and we will be mighty sure to know 
just when to do a thing and when not 
to. 




OF- 



iiaars & Ci 




TOBACCO 



AT 



C. R. ELDER I The College Drug Store 



PHOTOGRAPHS IN CLASS ROOM 

Mr. MacKimmie has recently placed 
fourteen very interesting, framed pho- 
tographs of the famous buildings and 
old-time paintings around the moulding 
of his class-room. His idea in putting 
them up is not simply for looks, but in 
order that the students may thoroughly 
acquaint themselves with a large 
number of the old-time, world-famed 
pictures and buildings ; the Roman 
Pantheon, the Leaning Tower of Pisa 
and the works of many great artists 
and sculptors. He expects to change 
them from time to time, putting up 
new ones, so that a wider knowledge 
and a broader view may be gained of 
the world's greatest works and master- 
pieces. 



Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. student* 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

C L^^ S the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



£&rp*rvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst. Mass. 



Established 




1851 



i*f*^. 



Eimer & Amend 



205-2H Third Ave., Cor. I8th St. 



New York 



Headquarters For 



Chemicals, Chemical, Physical, Bacteriological 

Apparatus and Assay Goods 

jt > 

We carry the largest stock of Laboratory Supplies in the U. S. 

PROMPT SERVICE 



Our European connections are such that we are enabled to offer you 
the best service for duty-free importations on scientific supplies at the 
lowest prices. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 24. 1911. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 24, '9 



1 1, 







THEY talk about Dr. Elliot's five feet o f 
books, but in this weather what one needs 
is five feet of overcoat. It's here— all 
wool, built with intelligence and honesty; a com- 
bination of hand-work, head-work and business 
enterprise. 

If you are an out-door man it's worth 
$35. to you— but our price is only %&. 



HOCKEY 

[Continued from page I .] 



COOLEY BROS. 



Wkstfield, 



Mass. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



able to score, although both goals were 
threatened many times. 

In the extra period both teams 
showed the strain of the hard playing, 
and the shooting and passing was not 
as good as previous. Hutchinson 
scored the shot which turned out to be 
the winning tally, one minute before 
the period ended, after receiving a 
pretty pass in front of the Field Club's 
cage. 

The sensational shooting of Hutch- 
inson and the goal tending of French 
featured an exciting game. 

The line-up: — 

M. A, C. LOUDEN FIELD CLUB. 

Ackerman. g g. French 

Adams, p p, MacCormack, Burllngame 
Needham, cp cp. Mayer 

Jones, r r, Burllname, MacCormack 

Peckham. Iw lw. Stanley 

Woolley, rw rw, Dunn 

Hutchinson, c c. Wheeler 

Summary: Score — M. A. C. 5. Louden 
Field Club 4. Coals — Huchinson 3 : Jones, 
Peckham, Stanley 2, MacCormack, 
Wheeler. Penalties, two minutes— Mac- 
Cormack, Needham 2, Mayer 2, Jones. 
Five minutes — Stanley, Needham. 
Referee— MacDonald. Umpire— Braman. 
Timer— Brooks. 




jtouH. 



i 



1 



A GOOD THING 



AND 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



H. W. FIELD 

... FLORIST ... 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



If. D. OILMAN. C. A. MOKFKT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealer* 

IN 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Maim street. 

Worcester, Mass. 



COX SONS 



It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $$s°> M-oo. *5-°°- 

E.M.BOLLES 

" THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



Clapp, '12. 



1 leers, '12. 



SUNDAY VESPERS 

[Continued from first pafa.l 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



OPP. ACADEMY OF MUSIC, 

NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 




AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



this life. It is the same for the next 
life. 

I know it comes into your mind now 
about the Prodigal Son and the Thief 
on the Cross. Forgiveness, words are 
not capable of expressing too strongly 
the forgiveness of God. He will for- 
give, but it Is the prodigal who will not 
ask to be forgiven. The prodigals 
who do this are few and far between. 
Multiply as you will the possibilities of 
grace, you cannot but come to the 
result that that other part of eternal 
life depends upon what we are here. 

But, you say, what about our aims 
and ambitions which we sought for. 
We did not attain them. According 
to you our future life depends upon 
what our lives are here, then there we 
shall be reckoned with unfairly, for we 
did not have time to fulfill our lives 
here. 1 ask do you and 1 want to be 
forever what we are now? Life is a 
matter of proportion. Do you want 
that we should be carried on now to 
the logical end? As we progress on 
our endless life so will we attain those 
aims which we lost here. The man 
who takes God for granted never fails. 
Earth has its vision of heaven, and it 
gains from it this power of endless life. 

Y. M. C. A. 

The Y. M. C. A. meeting last 
Thursday evening was led by Professor 
Foord who gave a concise and effective 
talk upon the necessity for honesty 
with one's self, for strength of charac- 
ter, and for temperance in all the varied 
forms of college life. At the close of 
his address a short business meeting 
was held and thirty new members were 
voted into the association. 



We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



j»E. N. PARI5EAU,> 

HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



RAZORS J10NED 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



SOCIAL UNION 

The first progressive bid-whist 
smoker held at M. A. C. was given in 
the drill hall Saturday evening. Stu- 
dents and faculty mingled and enjoyed 
an evening with cards and cigars. 
Thirty tables played, and at the end of 
twenty-two hands the scores were col- 
lected and the awards announced. 
Prizes were given to the two highest 
and the lowest point winners. The first 
prize was awarded to B. P. Johnson 
'14. the second to E. I. Wilde '12, 
and to E. J. Robinson '12. was given 
the booby prize. A four-piece set of 
M. A. C. seal jewelry went to the win- 
ner, who had 72 points, and a pearl- 
handled jack-knife to the possessor of 
the next highest score of 69 points. 
This evening was greatly enjoyed 
by all of the participants and as the 
partners were changed every hand the 
"getting together" and becoming 
acquainted with faculty members and 
each other was greatly encouraged. 

After the playing had ceased In- 
formal dancing was begun and the fel- 
lows further enjoyed themselves. 

COMMUNICATION 



would be wrong, in the least, for any 
student to pick up a wandering news- 
paper, or a stray boot, which he might 
find at large upon the campus, and con- 
sign It to its proper resting place. 

We are trying hard, with very inad- 
equate funds, to organize a more effic- ; 
ient system of care for the college 
grounds. We urgently need the prac- 
tical cooperation of the student body, 
of every individual student, and I feel 
that we can count on the help of every 
man who has the least sort of pride in 
our beautiful campus. 

F. A. Wauch. 



(Communications to the Signal concerning mat- 
ters o( general interest are welcomed. The Signal 
is not to be held responsible tor the opinions thus 
expressed.) 

To the Editor. College Signal: 

Everyone connected with M. A. C. 
is proud of the college grounds. The 
students patriotically and justly feel 
that we have one of the finest cam- 
puses possessed by any college in the 
country. Moreover, we all want it to 
be better, and are all interested in the 
future development and improvement 
of the whole estate. 

It Is generally known that elaborate 
plans are under way for the develop 
ment of the grounds, including their 
more systematic care. There is one 
important matter in which every stu- 
dent can cooperate with the manage- 
ment to secure a very substantial 
improvement. As a business fact, 
the most difficult problem which we 
have to meet, is that of keeping* the 
grounds clean and in order. This 
costs more in labor and money than 
anything else connected with the whole 
landscape gardening enterprise. 

A large part of the waste which 
Utters the campus and greatly detracts 
from its beauty, comes from the care- j 
lessness and thoughtlessness of stu- i 
dents. There are quantities ofj 
cracker boxes, shredded wheat boxes, 
and even bottles, and cigarette boxes, 
left lying about, when really there is 
no need for it. There are proper 
places to throw such waste, and cer- : 
tainly every student who has any , 
college spirit will think it worth while, I 
to take some pains to put the waste in I 
the waste boxes. Surely the student 1 
sentiment on such questions of house- 
hold cleanliness is not so low as to per- 
mit any man to empty his waste bas- 
ket out of the back window, or to leave 
out on the lawn the rejects of his mid 
night lunch. Indeed. 1 do not think it 



DRAMATIC READING CONTEST 

The special Dramatic Reading Con- 
test announced two months ago will 
occur at Assembly this week. As a 
result of last week's preliminaries, the j 
following five men will contest for 1 
prizes: W. Y. Chun '13, The Quar- j 
rel Scene from "Julius Caesar"; L. j 
F. Guild '13, "The Polish Boy" by] 
Stephens; H. M. Baker ' 13, "The 
Unknown Rider" by Lippard ; F. W. 
Read '14, "The Soul of the Violin" 
by Merrill, F. D." Griggs '13, The 
Galley Scene from "Ben Hur" ; alter- 
nate R. C. Blake '13. 

The prizes are a ten-dollar gold 
piece and a five-dollar gold piece. 

These contests are intended to dis- 
cover new dramatic material among 
the younger students of the college, 
and as such fulfilled their purpose well 
this year, as this week's contest will 
show. 



"PROF. STOCK" 

AlHl tlif Single .Klfiiifiit Itiiftrlnr. 

Professor Stotkbridge had no patience with m. tilled single 
element doctrine, which de|K.'nds for its mk i-ess on the potential 
fertility— no patience with the farmer who was trying to find OUl for 
himself if he could leave out any one of the three leading elements 
of plant nutrition (nitrogen, potash ami phosphoric at id), or hoe 
little of each he could get along with. That was 1 proper Itlbjc* 1 

for the scientific worker to investigate but until be knew more 

about it, the practical farmer, who had his living to make ami 
his bills to pay, should not tinker with it. To Btockbridgfl it 
meant, in the end, improvident farming. At best, the farmer had 
to take great chances, especially with the weathei, the largest 

factor in crop raising, over which he had no control, bat he 

should take no chances with the things which he could control. 

Among these were the amount and kind ol manure which lw »D 

plied to his crops. Tims, if lie hoped fa I Stated I top he should 

.it least fertilise Intelligently for that crop. For the man who was 

dependent on his crops any other COOfM was nnwisr Moreover, 
any other course would leave the soil machine in I poorer eondi- 

tion than he found it. Broadly speaking, to encourage him to 

take out more than he put hack was not onllf bad economy, l>ut 
had morals, and should he discouraged, for in the end it would 
lead to crop bankruptcy. 

" Shufy t/ir />/, 1 nt foo,/ />><>l>/f»i. " 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 






I. M. LABROVITZ 



THE 



RESOLUTIONS 

Whereas. It hath pleased God in His 
infinite wisdom to take unto Himself the 
motner of our beloved classmate. Herbert 
T Hatch, be it 

Rosolved. That we. the members of the 
class of Nineteen Hundred Thirteen do 
extend to him and his family our heartfelt 
sympathy in this their hour of sorrow ; and 
be it further 

Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to our bereaved classmate, that a 
copy be filed in the records of the class and 
that a copy be published in the College 
Signal. 

( Nils P Larsen. 
For the Class. ! Reyer H.Van Zwai.enburg, 
( Everett H. Coo*er. 

Whereas. It hath pleased God in His 
infinite wisdom to take unto Himself the 
father of our beloved classmate. Walter E, 
Rosebrooks. be it 

Resolved. That we, the members of the 
class of Nineteen Hundred Thirteen do | 
extend to him and his family our heartfelt 
sympathy in this their hour of sorrow, and 
be it further 

Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to our bereaved classmate, that a 
copy be filed in the records of the class and 
that a copy be published in the College 
Signal. 

I Nils P. Larsen, 
For the Class. ] Reyer H.Van Zwalenburg 
( Everett H. Cooper. 

Whereas, It has pleased God in his infinite 
wisdom to take unto himself the mother of 
our beloved friend and brother. Herbert T. 
Hatch, be it 

Resolved, That we, the members of the 
Sigma Tau Delta Fraternity, do extend to 
him our sincere sympathy in this his hour of 
sorrow : and be it further 

Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to our bereaved brother, that a copy 
be filed in the records of the Fraternity, and 
that a copy be published in the College 
Signal. 

( h. c. hutchings. 
For the Fraternity, j Everett H. Cooper, 

f George A. Mallett. 



Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits and Overcoats To Order 
Always a large and select line of Foreign and Domestic Woolen-,. 

Dyeing, Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing a Specialty 

\ guaranteed ht In all the latest kinds of garments. 

Renovated Suits lor Sale. 

A first-class line of Kent's Furnishing floods always on hand. K 0/ \\ . 

Collars and Dress Shirts. Satisfaction guaranteed in every traiis.i. Hon 



1 1 Amity Street, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Tel. 302-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Mentis 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

.ind 

' I iss Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and (hiss 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 

PHOTOGKAVUllBal 

WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 24, 191 1 . 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 24, 1911 



■..•.■.■ .\- .•.■.■.■.■.■.■..•.■.■.■.■..■.■.■.■.■.■..■.■.■.■.■..■.■.■.■.■.■.■.• .-.r .-.■.•.■ .-&M 

GOODS FOR MEN. 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



A 




^ WA>fi) Wsh and Scotch Woolens. 

4 ' < r 



THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 

//////////.^^^^^^■.•••••.•.•••.•••••.••••••'■'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'■'•'•'>VA 



H. E. KINSMAN, 



FOR ia YKARS OFFICIAL 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

AT WILLIAMS COLLEGE 

Has just opened an up-to-date and thoroughly equipped 
Studio for high grade work, in the 

NASH BLOCK, MAIN STRCCT, tt/IHCBST 

Where absolute satisfaction is guaranteed every customer. 
All styles, up-to-date and prices reasonable. 



The place to have your group and single pictures taken correctly. Call 
and make your appointments. Visitors welcome. 



S I CAM PITTING, Telephone 59—4. 

GAS FIT TIN*;, TIKNIMG. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Wini>ows, 
Memorial Windows, 
l.KAIl I.ic.hts, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 

FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village .Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, - Mais. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Okkk I Hours: 
WtoltfA.M. I.HOI.i.-ll'.M. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 

The Department of Landscape 
Gardening is having an exhibition this 
week of photographs by Professor 
Waugh. These are enlargements 
and modifications from negatives re- 
cently made in Germany, Italy, and 
England. Everyone is welcome to 
inspect them at any time during the 
week, between 8 a. m. and 9 p. m., 
Sunday excepted. They will be dis- 
played in the reading room on the 
main floor of Wilder Hall, until Jan. 
25th. 

FLORICULTURE. 

Last Friday, Jan. 20th, Mr. C. F. 
Boyle of Galvin Bros., Inc., lectured 
before the class in floriculture, He 
gave demonstrations in the different 
modes and manners of designing 
flowers in wreaths, garlands, etc. 

Next Friday, Jan. 27th. Mr. W. 
Elliott of Brighton, Mass., will lecture 
on roses. He is a well known rose 
culturist and his wonderful flowers 
have taken majiy prizes at the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Building 
in Boston. 

On Saturday, Jan. 21st, an observa- 
tion trip to the commercial ranges and 
retail stores of Springfield, Mass. was 
taken by the floriculture classes. 

POMOLOGY. 

Prof. Sears has been appointed 
Vice President for Massachusetts of 
the New England Fruit Show. It is 
expected that another exhibition will 
be held the coming autumn. 

The Short Course class in Pomo- 
logy, under Mr. Norman's direction, 
has been cleaning up the scattered 
old apple trees on the college property 
south and west of Prof. Hasbrouck's 
house. The trees have been pruned 
and scraped and certainly look more 
hopeful to those who did the work. 
Perhaps the general public may not 
share this view at present but every- 
body will admit that they look different 
and the Pomology Department is will- 
ing to wait for the justification of the 
methods used. 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



REPORT OF TENNIS ASSOCIA 
TION, SEASON ioio 

Receipts. 
i Appropriation, $75 00 

i Guarantees, 43 00 

! Equipment. 14 95 



$132 95 



Olvmpia Candv Go. 

257 Main St., 
Northampton, - - Mass. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



Total receipts, 

Expenditures. 

Equipment, $28 35 

Guarantees and entertainment, 18 05 
Trips, 76 61 

Miscellaneous, 7 85 



Total expenditures. 
Balance, 



i 



$130 86 
$2 09 

Frank L. Thomas, Mgr. 
John N. Summers, Auditor. 

The account was accepted by the 
Athletic Board and at the same meet- 
ing, the following men were awarded 
the tMt: Captain Rockwood, L. M. 
Johnson, D. Y. Linn and Manager 
Thomas. 



Wright 
& Ditson 

Football and Basketball suits 
the standard at all leading 
colleges. The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
C iuards the best and most pract- 
ical, also Skates and Hockey 
Goods. The Wright & Dit- 
JL son Sweaters have 
%U"'StJ long been recognized 
_ i£ as the best. 

<£_> College Students and Athletes 

fSti?* who want the real, superior 

««•. <J2> / articles for the different sports 

»•• *» T °" should get the kind that near 

our trade-mark. Catalogue Jree. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

22 Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

76 Weybosset Street, Providence, R. I. 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. W. Blaney, '11, 
C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, E. L. Winn, 87 
Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursdays. 
Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations, violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a; Main St., Masonic Hldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only jrom I A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Great River Water Power Go. 

E. A. b* S. A. ALLEN, Props. 
Office, Gillett Block. 

WESTFIED, MASS. 



ROOMS WITH HEAT, 
POWER A LIGHT 

FOR 1* 1£ KT 



BALED SHAVINGS 

put up in attractive shape, 

in car lots. 

PRICE ON APPLICATION 



FRANK S. O'BRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND HACK 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 

8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, - - MASS. 

Telephone 



ALUMNI NOTES 

M. A. C. CLUB OF WASHINGTON, D. C. 

The 1911 annual dinner of the club 
will be held at the Cosmos club, 1520 
H. Street, Washington, D. C. Sat- 
urday, Jan. 28, at 6 p. m. President 
Butterfleld is expected to be present 
and we hope for the best meeting of 
years. 

C. H. Griffin, Secretary. 

To the Members of the Class of 
1909. M. A. C.: — 

If you haven't sent in your letter 
for the forthcoming class letter do so 
at once. This letter promises to be 
better than the last. Everyone has 
more to write. You want to hear from 
your friends; your friends want to hear 
from you. The letters received have 
been great, but we want to hear from 
all. Don't wait ! Write now, to-day ! 
Charles S. Putnam, Sec. 

Walpole. N. H., Jan. 18, 191 I. 

'83.— C. H. Preston has been re- 
elected' to the Board of Trustees of 
the College. 

'95.- H. D. Hem3nway. general 
secretary of the Peoples' Institute of 
Northampton at the recent election 
was elected a member of the City 
Council for 1911. Mr. Hemenway 
is organizing an excursion to Southern 
Texas and Mexico to start Feb. 6th. 
The party will be gone about two 
weeks. Less than a one way fare and 
a special car all the way makes the 
trip attractive. 

'00.— J. E. Halllgan has been 
appointed football coach of tne Louis 
iana State university for next season, 
succeeding Mayhew of Brown who will 
hereafter assist in coaching. Mr. 
Halligan was referee at the football 
game between the Harvard Law school 
and an All- Louisiana team. 

'05.— H. F. Tompson Is becoming 
prominently connected with the Veg- 
etable Growers Association of Amer- 
ica. He is the state vice-president 
from Massachusetts and chairman of 
the membership committee. At the 
recent convention of the association 
at Grand Rapids, Mich., he read a 
paper entitled "The Details of the 
Operation of a Massachusetts Market 
Garden " In his report as state vice- 
president he gave statistics concerning 
the market garden busines under glass 
in Massachusetts. 

'06.— Married in Newburyport, 
Dec. 31, C. E. Hood and Miss Ethel 
Ruby Welch. 

'06. — J. E. Martin visited relatives 
in Brockton during the Christmas 
Holidays. 

'08.— Married in Cambridge, Vt, 
Dec. 7, H. B. Reed and Miss Ildah 
Millicent Gray. At home after Jan. 
15, Greenwich, Conn. 

'10. — L. C. Brown recently under- 
went a successful operation for appen- 
dicitis. 

10.— R. S. Eddy, F. T. Haynes, 
W. C. Johnson and W. A. Cloues had 
a reunion and banquet in Boston dur- 
ing the Christmas holidays 



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Gold Medal Corn 

The Only Gold Medal 

(.iven at tin: Grand New England Corn Im- 
position held at Worcester, Mass , Nov. 7th to 
1 2th, was awarded to Hon. Theodore C. Bates 

of North Brookfield, Mass. 

For CROP and for EXHIBIT 

Those who visited the Corn Kxposition will recall the Creat Pyramid and 
(it eat Cone of Corn near the entrance. 

There mere 3,000 Perfect Ears of Corn on the Cone 

none of them less than 12 inches long. 

There mere 2,000 Perfect Ears of Corn on the Pyramid 

from 13 1-2 to 14 inches long. 

On One Acre of Flint Corn Mr. Bates Raised One Hundred Seventy 
Three and Three-Tenths (173.3) Bushels of Ears, Weighing 70 Pounds 
to the Bushel. 

Allowing 43 per cent for moisture and cob, and reducing to 12 per cent 
moisture basis (average moisture in crib dry corn) we find that Mr. Mates 
produced 

One Hundred Forty and Three-Tenths (140.3) Bushels of Shelled 
Corn per Acre ; 56 pounds of shelled corn to the bushel. 

The yield was certified by three competent men as sworn to by them before 
the clerk of the courts at Worcester. 

The Worcester Magazine says: 

'• The Authorities at the Corn Show give this Yield the Credit of 
Excelling any Record of Flint Corn In this Country." 

Truly a wonderful tribute to Mr. Bates' skill as a farmer, to New Kn^Iand 
Soil, and to 

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with which this remarkable crop was raised 
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If you have not received a copy of our handsome 
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send you one if you mention the COLUBQS SlOMAI* 




The College Signal, Tuesday, January 24, 191 



PI. J. Lapone. Inc. 



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and Knvelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kngraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

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Offers a thorough training in agricultural 
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NECESSARY EXPENSES MODERATE 

LOCATION OF COLLEGE IDEAL 

ATTENDANCE RAPIDLY INCREASING 

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Amherst, Mass. 



VARSITY MEN 

and most of the upperclassmen 
wear 

DUDLEY 

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'THERE IS A REASON." 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

M. A. C. Dramatic society. 

Debating Society. 

Public Speaking Council, 



H. W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis. President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill. President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

J. E. Dudley. Jr., President 

R. C. Barrows. President 

1. C. Gilgore, President 



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THT COLLEGE SIGNAL 

■ — r» « a ■ — ^— ■ — 



Vol. XXI. 



9 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



I 



I 



HOC|J 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 31, 1911. 
ASSEMBLY BREEDERS MEET 



No. 16 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 



Successful Meeting of Connecticut Val- 
ley Breeders' Association. 



Professor J. C. Graham Appointed to 
Head New Department. 



First Defeat of Season Administered by Dramatic Reading Contest Held in Col- 
M. I. T. lege Chapel. 

Our hockey team met its first The first Dramatic Reading con- 
defeat of the year at the hands of test ever held in this college took place 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the College chapel Wednesday af- 
by the score of 4-3. A tie score at ternoon, Jan. 25, in the regular as- 
the end of the second half necessitated sembly period. Professor F. B. Mc- 
the playing of an additional period in Kay, who presided at the contest spoke 

which "Tech" scored two goals and first, giving a short sketch of the idea j addressed by P. M 
Massachusetts one. The game ; of the contest which was to bring out spoke on "What the Dairy Bureau of 
started with the puck in Tech's terri- | anyone of dramatic ability. He then!; the state is doing for the farmer.' 

tory where it stayed for about five j introduced Woon Y. Chun who was en- j This address was followed by a very ^ SUCC essful teacher, 

minutes, when the Tech team by very thusiastically received In the "Quarrel | Interesting and instructive talk by Dr. ! ^^ rec omrr.ended by the 

clever team-work brought the puck Scene from 'Julius Caesar." He was Mark W. Richard. Secretary of the i s of the Univers | t y of Wls- 

down and Stucklen shot the first goal. ; followed by Louis F. Guild who gave State Board of Health on ' 



The Connecticut Valley Breeders' 
Association met here Jan. 24th for 
their convention which proved to be 
one of the most successful of it- kind 
ever held. At 10-30 the convention 
numbering about sixty, were very ably 



Announcement was made on Jan. 
26th that the trustees of the college 
have appointed J. C. Graham to be 
h- ad of the newly created department 
of poultry husbandry. Mr. Graham 

were very <tuiy r * 

Harwood who 1 -^orn on a Western farm gradu- 
ated from a Western Normal school 
and has been studying poultry hus- 
bandry at the University of Wisconsin. 



; cousin and school officials with whom 
Board of Health and its Relation to co " b "' 

' he has worked. He will begin his 
the Milk Problem in Massachusetts. < ne nas wu '* cu - • 

. ,, duties In Amherst about the middle of 

This talk was very enthus.astically 1 *i Um in A ™ 



The play was back and forth until > Stephen's "Polish Boy" in a very im- 
Stucklen shot another goal. It was ■ pressive manner. The Speaker's in- 
then that the Massachusetts team I terpretation of the death scene was ex- 
started its real work, Hutchinson j cellent. Horace M. Baker was then 
shooting a difficult goal which was fol- introduced and gave "The Unknown 
lowed by a decisive shot from Peckham \ Rider," by Lippard, in a way which 
which tied the score and closed the i brought him a well-merited reward, 
period. The second period was decis- \ Mr. Baker has a splendid voice which 
ively in Massachusett's favor although added much to the selection which is 

we were unable to score. Our for- ' naturally strong. Frederick W. Read 1 served in Draper Hall at 12-45. At 
wards were always clustered around | gave Merrill's "Soul of ^he Violin." i half-past one Professor J. A. Foord 
the Tech goal and Rauney. the Tech in a very able manner. Concluding gave an address on ' What the Farmer 



received. At twelve o'clock there 
was an inspection of the college barns 
which was very intructive. All were 
loud in their praise of the way in 
which the barns were kept and their 
general arrangement. Dinner was 



February, and will have the supervis- 
ion of much of the work of the short 
poultry course, which will begin Feb. 
27th. 



goal was literally showered with shots ! the program was '''he Galley 
which he took care of by phenomenal Scene from 'Ben Hur" given by Fred- 
playing, which repeatedly saved his 
team from defeat. The third period 



can do for himself." This talk was 
very practical, informal and highly 



of five minutes was marked by the 
quick rushes and shooting of both 
teams. Tech scored twice in quick 
succession and the way in which the 
Massachusetts team went into the 
game left no doubt In the spectators' 
minds that time was the only 
question regarding the outcome of 
the game. Jones scored for us by a 



erick D. Griggs in a very impressive instructive. hollowing ProftMK* 

manner which coula not but inspire | Foord, Professor W. D. Hurd gave an 
the audience. extremely interesting and practical talk 

The judges, -Mrs. J. B. Lindsey. j on the benefits of Breeders' Organiza- 
Rev. John L. Ivey and Mr. J. K. | tion. The convention was then open 



Mills '77 then rendered the following 
decision. 

First.— Horace M. Baker. 

Second.— Frederick D. Griggs. 

Third, with honorable mention, — 
Louis F. Guild. 

The first and second prizes were ten 



very clever shot with about two min 

utes ieft to play. During these two ! and five dollar gold piece. 

minutes several shots were made at 



^7^7^ ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSE 

what rough in the second period, three IN BEE KEEPING 

men being off the ice at once. a course in bee keeping will oe given 

The Door condition of the ice was : tne sc cond semester by Dr. Burton N. j 
' " c ^ , , . ,. .. ,;inate them at once for if they get well tn _ things of those who have pre - 
responsible for the difficulty experi, Gates. Some of the subjects which , , „ . : ^ Li _,__£ 



HISTORY AND RURAL 
LITERATURE 

For the coming Semester, Prof. G. 
N. Holcomb will offfer the following 
two courses ; 

1. The History of New England 
from 1815 to 1900. 

This course will cover the political 
history of New Englnnd since the war 
of 1812, and its correlation with the 
history of the United States, together 
BROWN TAIL MOTHS FOUND : with the development of New England 
Prof. Henry T. Fernald of the ento- agriculture, manufactures, railroads 
mology department states that the I and trade, and will include special 
brown-tail moth has been discovered studies of selected leaders in political, 
on Pleasant street in Amherst. A few l agricultural and industrial life, 
were found in Belohertown last year 2 . Rural Literature. 



to discussion and closed at 3-30. 



and Professor Fernald and his assist 
ants have been on the watch for them 
in Amherst this season. He states 
that it is very important that every- 
thing possible should be done to exterm 



The course is a critical and appreci- 
ative study of the writings of lovers of 
nature and country life, including the 
nature poets and such naturalists as 
Thoreau and John Burroughs, and of 



enced in carrying the puck and fast W j|i be covered are 
skating ; yet to lose this game, which \ Briefly, the history of bee keeping, 
was certainly the best ever seen on (r)e natural history, anatomy and phys- 
the M. A. C. pond, is not a bad j iogy of bees; races and breeding 
defeat, as the Tech aggregation is one i pro blems; the handling of bees; pro- 
duction of comb and extracted honey ; 



of 



of the fastest of New England colleges 
Dartmouth and the Louden Field Club 
were defeatea by the Institute team 
and Harvard barely secured a victory 

from them by one point. Our team | products; briefly, the organization 
was not m its best form and played a ■ tne industry, 
game not up to the ability which they ' An effort will be made to acquaint 
showed in the games at New York. the horticulturist in the use and main- 
The score : tenance of bees for service in orchard 

TECHNOLOGY. ' MASSACHUSETTS. 

Scoville. rw r - Peckham ing un der glass, cranberry culture, etc, 

Hutchinson Thg course wi || be practical, con- 

, °«, J °?r! sisting of lectures and work in the 
lw, Wooley ° 

apiary and field, with three credits. 



started it is practically impossible to j sente d the attractions which agriculture 
get rid of them by artificial means. \ and other rural pursuits have to men 
Every one is advised to examine his j of cu ]ture and idealism. This course 
trees and if anything is found that ' w ,|| be f va i ue no t on iy to those going 
looks suspicious to send it to Professor ; int0 f ar ming but to teachers of agricul- 

Fernald's office. The peit is now to ture anc j those interested in agricul- 

duction Ot ComD ana exiraciea nuney ; . ., 

auction 01 coo j ^ found . n the shape Qf smal , S)lver . , ura| joumalism 

wax production ; types of hives, imp e- ■ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ at ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ & 

men*, etc.; forage and forage plants ; of the branch*, usually and Seniors and are courses of three 

packing, markets and marketing 



worked in with dead leaves. 



hour credit. 



Sloan, c 
Storke. lw 
Stucklen. r 



I Continued on p«e« +•) 



been made an assistant in the college 
ing, market gardening, cucumber grow- ^ assjgned t0 the Depar tment of 

English. Miss Goessmann will not be 
in charge of class- work, and will prob- 
ably be employed chiefly in theme- 
reading. 



AN ASSISTANT IN ENGLISH ■ 

Miss Helena Goessmann, daughter '94.— George E. Smith died of 
of the late Professor Goessman, has pneumonia In Sheffield, Friday Jan. 20. 



'02.— D. N. West is connected 
I with the Black Lake Consolidated 
Asbestos Co., Limited, and is located 
at Black Lake, Quebec. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 31, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 31, 1911. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOASD OF EDITORS. 

EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, Editor-in-Chief. 

HAROLD F. W1LLARO, 1911, Manage Editor. 
IRVING W. DAVIS. 1911. Alumni Notei. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY. 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYAL N.HALLOWELL.1912, Assistant Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912. College Notes. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Department Notes. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALLEN, 1911, Business Manager. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1 9 1 2, Aaat. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN. Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Peat Office. 

Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, JAN. 31. No 16. 



Many students, whose studies do 
not bring them into connection with 
the Floriculture department, probably 
do not know very much concerning the 
work of that division. The flower 
show of last Saturday brings to one's 
attention the fact that progress is 
being made. But recently one of 
Boston's leading florists spoke to the 
classes and was very much surprised 
to learn how much and how practical 
the course is. Practical experience, 
together with the results of long years 
of work by leading florists and growers, 
gained from their talks, gives a good 
foundation and then such affairs as 
exhibits of floral designs and decora- 
tions present an opportunity to learn 
further and develope one's ability. 



A word of precaution at this time 
concerning the final examinations may 
not be amiss. As this issue comes after 
some finals have been taken, of course 
it is almost a last-hour warning though 
many of the tests are yet to come. 
In the first place you promised your- 
self and others that the game would be 
played squarely and now comes the 
test as to whether or not you meant 
what was asserted. 

As unsatisfactory as the present 
examination system may seem, yet it 
is in most cases, the only manner in 
which the faculty are able to ascertain 
the amount of knowledge which a stu- 
dent has obtained in a course. Surely 
anyone who has enough ability to enter 
this institution has a capacity to learn 
enough in a course to pass without 
difficulty ; on the other hand the fac- 
ulty must demand a certain amount of 
learning from each student in each 
course in order to uphold the standard 
of the college and the prestige of the 
alumni. The penalty for misrepresen- 
tation is severe, and after-thought will 
not avail ; so play fair and the self- 
consciousness of a square-deal will be 
the result. 



Milton L. Sibley of Worcester, has 
left college on account of the death of 
his father, which occurred in Wor- 
cester on Friday, the 13th. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Prof. C. S. Heller recently gave a 
most interesting and beneficial address 
in Lynnfield Center on the "Home 
Vegetable Garden." 

The next meeting of the Connecticut 
Valley Breeder's association will be 
held at Smith school, Northampton, 
will be Feb. 21 or 28. 

Professor McKay announces that 
the first debate will come March 8, 
the preliminaries to be held the second 
week of the second semester. 

President Kenyon L. Buttertield 
spoke at the meeting of the Twentieth 
Century club on Jan. 21. He 
addressed the club on the social and 
economic conditions of New England. 

R. H. Van Zwaluwenburg, editor of 
the 1913 Index with his assistant R. 
J. Borden, and O. G. Anderson busi- 
ness manager, and assistant business 
manager H. W. Angier, announce a 
beginning on the publication. 

As a result of the Sophomore com- 
petition for positions as artists on the 
1913 Index board, three men have 
been chosen. They are C. Herbert i 
Brewer, Fred D. Griggs and Clarence 
D. Roberts. Eight men submitted 
drawings to the judges, Professor 
Waugh and Instructor Noyes. The 
class is indeed fortunate in having so 
many first- class men to pick from, and 
the result should be a well illustrated 
annual. Brewer will act as art editor 
and will do the full page work ; Griggs 
will do the cartooning and Roberts is 
well qualified to handle the designing. 

Prof. F. C. Sears was the speaker 
at the Middlesex North Institute held 
at the Westford town hall on Monday, 
Jan. 30. His motning subject was 
,4 The Pruning of Fruit Trees," and in 
the afternoon he spoke on "Personal 
Exerience in Starting an Orchard in 
Massachusetts." 

Professor Maynard, formerly pro- 
fessor of Horticulture at our college, 
gave an address last week at the 
Y. M. C. A. hall in Amesbury. under 
the auspices of the Amesbury and Salis- 
bury Agricultural and Horticultural 
society. His subject was "Fruit 
Culture in New Engrand." 

Our college has decided to plant an 
orchard of 2000 trees, as an experi- 
ment, on the Hudson Brook farm in 
North Adams. The trees will be set 
out in the spring and from time to time 
during their growth, Instructors wili go 
there and lecture on apple-growing, 
using the trees in demonstration. 

On Jan. 15th Prof. W. D. Hurd 
addressed the men's club at the First 
church in Amherst on "Recent Prog- 
ress in Plant and Animal Improve- 
ment." He emphasized the economic 
value of this improvement by stating 
the fact that it is not only possible but 
practical to increase the product of 
corn, potatoes, wheat and other staples 
10 per cent, thereby adding many mil- 
lions of dollars to the wealth of the 
country. Similar improvement in ani- 
mals will add many more results to the 
animal income of the people. 



UP -TO- DATE 



FOOTWEAR 



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EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full lint, of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



TRAVELING 

TOILET SETS 

NEW STYLES 



Shaving Mirrors. 



DEUEL'S 



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MRS. EI. E. PERRY 

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SPECIALISTS IN 

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Rings, Charms Prizes. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 



MERRICK WOODS 

The influence of the Amherst Board 
of Trade has been sought in favor of 
the movement to ask the Legislature 
to make the Merrick woods in South 
Amherst a state reservation in charge 
of the department ot Forestry of our 
college. This tract of primeval forest 
has long been desired by lumbermen, 
eager to cut down its Rreat pines and 
hemlocks. As long as the owner, 
Loomis Merrick, lived, he guarded the 
trees and no money could tempt him 
to sacrifice them. Now, however, to 
settle his estate, the administrator will 
be obliged to sell the wood lot to the 
highest bidder. The college needs 
the forest as an object lesson by which 
to teach the students how to utilize a 
forest without destroying it and to show 
a model forest as an example to all 
land owners. Under proper regulations 
it could be opened to visitors and all 
who wish to pursue nature study for 
scientific or aesthetic purposes. These 
giant trees are all that remain of the 
great forest which the early settlers 
found covering all this region between 
the Holyoke range and Mt. Toby on 
the north. The little settlement east 
of the tract was long called Logtown 
because tne farmers were allowed to 
cut as many logs in the swamp as 
their need required. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CIOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

( lothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specially 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



AND 



The Worthy, 

FRANK WKIIHER, M<;r. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Amherst Corner In Kathskellar. 

YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 



NOTICE TO SENIORS 
JUNIORS. 

The following courses not announced 
in the catalogue will be given the se- 
ond semester of this year: (1911.) 
Practical Sociology byPiofessor Eyerly. 

credit 3 hours. 
Advanced Surveying by Professor 

Ostrander, credit 3 hours. 
Elementary Law by Professor Hart, 

credit 1 hour. 
New England History, continued, by 

Professor Holcomb, credit 3 hours. 
Architecture and Landscape Garden- 
ing by Mr. Noyes, credit 2 hours. 
Bacteriology by Professor Paige, credit 

3 hours. 
Rural Literature by Professor Hoi 

comb, credit 3 hours. 
Bee keeping by Dr. Gates, credit 3 

hours. 
Field Geology by Professor Gordon, 

credit 3 hours. 



C*rp*ivter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No. i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mast. 



< W 



Established 



■ - 



1851 



.fteh 



Eimer & Amend 












205-21 1 Third Ave., Cor. 18th St. 



New York 




TOBACCO 



A T 



The College Drug Store 



MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT 

The third entertainment in the 
Cushman lecture course was given ' 
last Tuesday evening in the Cushman 
Methodist church by our musical 
organization. The opening number 
was "Courtship," by the Glee club. 
The mandolin club played the "Dream 
Waltz." A quartet, consisting of W. 
H. Hasey, R. H. Prouty, F. D.Griggs 
and F. J. Clegg sang "Invitation of 
the Dance." A reading was given 
by George Zabriskie. The quartet 
and glee club sang "We Gather 
Here." A serenade and -'Sonsof 
Old Mass'chuetts," were rendered by 
the combined clubs. 



Headquarikrs Iok 

Chemicals, Chemical, Physical, Bacteriological 
Apparatus and Assay Goods 

We carry the largest stock of Laboratory Supplies in the U. S. 

PROMPT SERVICE 

Our European connections are such that we are enabled to offer you 
the best service for duty free importations on scientific supplies at the 
lowest prices. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 31, 1911. 



HOCKEY 

[Continued from first pace. I 



Could, cp cp, Needham 

Vosa. p P> Adams 

Rauney, g g. Ackcrman 

Score— Tech 4, M. A. C. 3. Goals— 
Hutchinson, Peckham, Jones. Stucklen 3, 
Storke. Penalties— two minutes. Jones; 
one minute. Wooley 2, Gould, Stucklen, 
Hutchinson, Adams. Referee— Dr. P. L. 
Reynolds. Umpire— Washburn of Am- 
herst. Timers— Covill and Morse. 



POTATO CLUBS 

The agitation for more scientific 
education in agriculture started with 
the corn clubs for the South, has found 
an echo in Massachusetts, where boys 
and girls are forming potato clubs. 
Some 5,000 of them are already 
enlisted in the movement, under the 
direction of Professor Hart. 

There are two kinds of these potato 
clubs conducted under Professor 
Hart's guidance. One is for all boys 
and girls whose only object is to grow 
better potatoes. The other Is the 
"experiment club," whose members 
experiment in breeding potatoes. The 
best tubers are planted each year and 
saved for seed, and their produce is 
carefully watched and selected from 
each year. Thus, only those potatoes 
which show marked advantages are 
kept for propagation, and the result is 
a vastly improved tuber, both as to 
edibility and productiveness. 



THE RIFLE TEAM 

The work of the rifle team did not 
equal In the final score that of last ', 
week. More time was devoted to the ! 
prone shooting last week than to the off ! 
hand practice. Sharpe and Racicot 
could not keep up their phenominal 
work this week; but their fall was 
nearly made up by the general improve- 1 
mentof the rest of the team. Another 
week of offhand practice will be put in, 
In preparation for the shoot against 
Columbia. The official score for the 
third week's shooting was 1826. Cap- 
tain Martin finding one more point in 
making out • the final score. The 
scores for the week ending Feb. 4th. 

Standtne Prone Total 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



Baker, H. J. 


91 


98 


189 


Edminister, A. F. 


80 


91 


171 


Lloyd, E. R. 


84 


95 


179 


McDougall, A. F. 


88 


98 


186 


McLaughlin. F. A. 


93 


97 


190 


Murray, J. K. 


88 


96 


184 


Racicot. P. A. 


80 


93 


182 


Sharpe, A. H. 


92 


93 


187 


Stevenson, L. 0. 


79 


97 


176 


Wilde. E. I. 


84 


92 


176 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 




EW ELL'S 



SOPHOMORE FRESHMEN 
BASKETBALL 

The interclass basketball game was 
played in the Drill hall Saturday night, 
which resulted in an easy victory for 
the Sophomores. The outcome of the 
game was never in question as the 
second year team was the same as 
last year's and the first year team was 
somewhat handicapped by the absence 
of two players. The work of Huntington 
and Lane as guards was especially 
noticeable and only in the latter part 
of the second half did the Freshmen 
get any chances for goals. 

The line-up: — 
1913. 1914. 

Griggs. Sampson, c c. Williams 

Coville. Hayden. If If, Earle. Frost, Howard 
Huntington, rg rf. Allbee, Davies, Harris 
Lane, Angier. lg lg. Brewer 

Howe.Goodnough, rf rg.Taft.Dunn.Hadfield 

Goals — Huntington 4. Howe, Lane 2. Wil- 
liams 2. Goals from fouls — Howe2Coville. 
Brewer, Williams. Umpire — Chapman 
•07. Referee— Regan 08. 



868 952 1820 
INTERCOLLECIATE SHOOTINC. 

Columbia got total of 1888. the 
highest yet made in the rifle contest. 

In the week just closed, the highest 
score yet made in the Intercollegiate 
shooting was made by Columbia defeat- 
ing Princeton by more than 400 points 
1888 to 1432. At present there are 
three colleges who have won three 
matches: Columbia, Iowa ai.d M. A. 
C. 

Columbia beat Princeton, 1888 to 
1432. 

Cornell defeated Dartmouth, 1788 
to 1616. 

M. A. C. won from California, 1826 
to 0. (by default) 

Missouri State military school! 
defeated Arizona, 1673 to 1637. 

New Hampshire college won from ' 
Rhode Island college. 1947. 

Iowa defeated North Georgia 
"Aggies," 1873 to 1514. 

Washington State won from Purdue, 
1743 to 1685. 

No report received from Louisiana 
State University vs. University of 
Minnesota matcn. 

The standing of the teams: 

Won Lost 
M. AC. 3 

Iowa. 3 

Columbia. 3 , 

Louisiana. 2 

Cornell. 

Missouri S. M. S. 
Princeton, 
Purdue, 
Washington, 
New Hampshire. 
Dartmouth. 
North Georgia. 
Minnesota, 
Arizona, 
Rhode Island, 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



A GOOD THINO 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3. 50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



( Tapp, 



12. 



15eers, '12. 



We have a full line of Banners, 1'ost 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

RASKMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



M. D. OILMAN. 

TELEPHONE 



C. A. MOFrKT. 

1079-3. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



COMMENCEMENT ORATOR 

The Commencement orator at the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
next June will be Dr. Eugene Daven- 
port, Dean of the Illinois College of 
Agriculture, at the the University of 
Illinois. 

Dean Davenport is one of the fore- 
most agricultural educators of the 

country : has built up one of the "^ 

country t INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

strongest agricultural colleges in the 

United States, and is a speaker of; Howe '12. will lead the Yale eleven 
His recent book on education ' 



3 

3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
I 
1 








GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealer* 

IN 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Main Street. 

Worcester, Mass. 



7 Pleasant St. 

Amherst, 



Phillips Block 
Mass. 




j*E. N. PARISEAU,j« 

HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 

RAZORS HONED 



GOX SONS No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mas». 



AND 



VINING 

4th Avenue, New York. 



power. 

has attracted wide 

educators generally. 



attention among 



Hyatt '12, will 
eleven next year. 



lead the Army 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

I Passenger and 
i Baggage Transfer. 



Order* left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January jj, iqii. 



SECOND SEMESTER ENGLISH asparagus roots in connection with in- 

The training-course for men wishing ! vestlgations under the Adams Fund, 
to qualify for aDpointment as student Messrs. Haskings and his co-work- 
assistants in English will be open in I ers have also in process of examina- 
semester two. Sophomores and jun- 1 Hon a large number of samples of 
iors are eligible, and the course carries agricultural lime. It is intended to 
a 2-hour advanced credit. The number publish a bulletin on the chemistry of 
taking it will be limited, and Professor \ lime in the spring. 
Neal asks that themen who wish to en- The Feed and Dairy Section has 



roll to consult him as early as possible. 



SIGNAL STANDING JAN. 30 



1912 



Carpenter 21.07 
Williams 19.98 
Harlow 13.26 
Hutchins 4.75 

Zabriskie 25. 16 } „.-. 
Anderson 14.48 ( 

Clark 15.30 
Foster 13.04 
Wheeler 12.90 
Simmons 9.45 1914 
Allbee 4.90 
Damon 4.86 
Freeborn 1.00 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

LIBRARY. 

Among the new books recently added 
to the library are the following: 
The Fight For Conservation. 

By Gillford Pinchot, 
Insects and Diseases. 

R. W. Doane. 
The Elizabethan People. 

Henry Thew Stephenson. 
The Country Boy, 

Davenport. 
Leading American Men of Science. 

David Star Jordan, Editor. 
The Garden Primer, 

Grace Tabor and Gardner Teall. 
Dramatists of To-day, 

Ed. Everett Hale, Jr. 
Highways of Progress. 

James J. Hill. 
Hardy Plants for College Gardens. 

Helen R. Albee. 
An Illustrated Guide to Flowering 
Plants. 
George T. Stevens. M.D., Ph.D. 
How to Study Birds, 
Herbert K. Job. 
Poems of American History, 

Burton E. Stevenson, Editor. 
Reptiles of the World, 

— Ditmars, 
Gardens Near the Sea, 
Alice Lounsberry. 
Town Planning Practice, 
Raymond Unwin. 
The library has just received from 
The Queensland Department of Agri- 
culture, the Queensland Journal of 
Agriculture, volumes 9-25 1901 1910, 
which complete their entire set. 

THE EXPERIMENT STATION AND DE- 
PARTMENT OF PLANT AND ANIMAL 
CHEMISTRY. 

The Fertilizer s-ction has just issued 
Hatch Bulletin 135, by H. D. Has- 
kins, L. S. Walker and J. F. Merrill, 
in an edition of 18,000, giving the 
entire results of the inspection of com- 
mercial fertilizers for the year 1910. 

This section is now at work 
determining the ash constitutents of 



just completed a manual on the bulle- 
tin of the "Inspection of Cattle-Feed" 
for the year 1910. This will be is- 
sued in about a month. The work of 
testing pure bred cows increases from 
time to time. At present over 100 
cows are yearly ttsted under the 
supervision of Mr. Smith. 

The Experiment station has recently 
imported quantities of cocoanut meal 
and experiments are now under way 
with this foreign product. 

The station is likewise carrying on 
investigations concerning the effect . 
of lactic and butyric acids on | 
the digestion of the foods with which 
these cows are fed. 

The Station Staff has recently or 
ganized a seminar, which meets once 
in two weeks to discuss the work which 
is being carried on in the several 
sections. On Saturday, Jan. 2 1st, 
Messrs. Holland and Reed explained 
the work which they are doing towards 
perfecting the methods for determin- 
ing the several insoluble fatty acids. 

The Station has just revised and 
improved the drafts for the new laws 
that have controlled the trade in Com- 
mercial Fertilizers and secondly, have 
regulated the utensils and the apparatus 
for determining the value of milk and 
cream. 

These were presented at the annual 
meeting of the State Board of Agn 
culture In Boston. They were unani- 
mously carried. They voted to 
instruct their legislative committee to 
report this measure in the legislature. 
At their request, prepared petitions 
and measures were introduced by 
George H. Ellis, Trustee, the director 
in correspondence with Mr. N. B. 
Wood of Norwood (who owns a large 
collection of valuable grape-vines), and' 
also, with the representative of his 
district In the legislature, for a bill. 
calling for the purchase of this collec- 
tion for the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. If this bill goes through the 
collection will be placed in charge of 
the experiment station. 

AGRICULTURE. 



HOME MIXING 

THE MATTER OF CROP INSURANCE 

Home-mixing would not be possible if manufacturers did not 
gather and prepare the materials. To nine, grind and acidulate 
phosphate rock ; to gather, from all four corners of the globe, all 
sorts and conditions of plant food and render them available ; to 
make tankage ; to grind and prepare hone, to crush the cotton- 
seed, extract the oil and prepare the meal ; all these steps have to 
be taken in advance of home-mixing, and are a part of the legiti 
mate fertilizer manufacturer's work, for which he is paid, or should 
be paid. The final mixing of the prepared materials is but the 
last step in a process more or less complicated, requiring more 01 
less delicate machinery and apparatus, as is necessary in the 
manufacture <>f sulphuric acid ; and yet the final mixing is very 
important in order that the finished product may be thoioughlv 
blended and etcfa ^r.iin contain its proportion of nitrogen, phot 
plioric acid and potash In available and diffusible forms. The 
observant home mixer recognizes this and ends by buying factor) 
mixed goods, foi he is looking for ctop insurance as well as cheap 
plant food. 

" Stiuh the plant food />n>Hrm. " 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



I. ME. LABROVITZ 

THE 

Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits and Overcoats To Order 
Alwavs a large end select line of Foreign and Domestic Woolens. 

Dyeing, Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing a Specialty 

A guaranteed fit in all the latest kinds of garments. 

Renovated Suits Kor Sale. 

A first-class line of dent's Furnishing Goodl alw.ns on hand. K. & V\ . 

Collars and I >rcss Shirts. Satisfaction guaranteed in every transaction 



1 1 Amity Street, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Tel. 302-4. 



H. W. FIELD 

... FfcOfUS* ... * 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



Six pure bred Ayrshire cows have 
I recently been added to the college 
' herd. Five of these came from Can- 
ada and one from Vermont. One of 
tha Canadian cows is recorded in the 
"Canadian Record of Performance" 
which is equivalent to the "Advanced 
Record" in the United States. 

FLORICULTURE. 

The Junior and short-course students 
in floriculture had an exhibition of 
floral designs and table decorations in 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

('all in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



OI'P. ACAUKMV '»l Mi ,K , 

NORTHAMPTON, mass. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



1 






The College Signal, Tuesday, January 31, 1911. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 31, 191 




COODS FOR MEN. 



French hall, Saturday Jan. 28 ; the 

designs consisted of crescents, pillows, 

fraternal emblems and numerous galax 

•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.••••••••'•••'•'••'•'•'•■•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•■•'•'•'•'•*•'•'•■•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•' wreaths. All manner of combinations 

of flowers were used; the majority of 
pieces contained however, either nar- 
cissus, carnations, sweet peas, violets, 
hyacinths or roses. It was estimated 
that the value of the pieces was 
$340.00. The table decorations for 
dinner were arranged with taste. 

On Feb. 3, Eber Holmes of Mont- 
rose will speak on "Roses," and one J 
week from that date M. A. Patten, a | 
sDecialist from Tewksbury, will lec- 
ture on ••Carnations." 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



English and Scotch Woolens. 



THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 

,•..•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•••• .•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.••••••••'•••••••*•'•'•'•'•'•'•*•'••••'•'•*•'•'•'• 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 



FOR 1-' YKAKS OFFICIAL 

PHOTOGRAPH CR 

AT WILLIAMS COLLEGE 

Has just opened an up-to-date and thoroughly equipped 
Studio for hi^h grade work, in the 

NASH BLOCK, MAIM STRCCT, KMHCRST 

Where absolute satisfaction i> guaranteed every customer. 
All styles, up-to-date and prices reasonable. 

The place to have your group and single pictures taken correctly. Call 
and make your appointments. Visitors welcome. 



STEAM Fl ITINO. Telephone $<*-4 

gas FITTING, tinnim; 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MASS 

FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village- Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Savings Bank Kl'k, 

Amherst, - Mass. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

D15NTAL ROOMS 

Wim.iams Hi.ock, Amherst, Mass. 

Ohk I Hoi/rs: 
DtolMAiMi ItSOtoSPiMi 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide (las admin- 
stered when desired 



Olvmpia Candv Go 



257 Maim s i ., 
Northampton, 



Ma; 



ALL KINDSOF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



EXTENSION DEPARTMENT. 

A leaflet has been published and is 
now being distributed describing the | 
work given in the short course in Poul- j 
try management, which begins Feb. 
27, and closes March 10, 191 1. 

The course covers such topics as 
breeding, feeding, and management, 
the operation of incubators and brood- 
ers, caponizing, practical work in con- 
structing poultry houses and appli- 
ances, kdling and preparing for mar- 
ket, judging and scoring poultry, etc. 

Besides the regular faculty, several 
of the leading authorities on poultry 
matters including Prof. James E. 
Rice, Cornell University, D. J. Lam- 
bert, Kingston. R. I.; John H. Rob- 
inson, editor of Farm Poultry; Henry 
D. Smith of Rockland, and many 
others have been engaged to help in 
this work. 

The M. A. C. poultry show will be 
held March 8, 9, 10, in connection 
with the short course. Breeders are 
invited to send in birds. No entry 
fees are charged. Score cards signed 
by D. J. Lambert will be returned with 
the birds. 

Throughout the course evening lec- 
tures will be given and these will be of 
a popular nature. Trips will be made 
to nearby commercial poultry plants to 
study methods, and the entire course 
will be arranged with the advantage of 
the poultry raiser and farmer in mind. 
Besides the poultry specialists 
named above, the following members 
of our faculty will also give instruction 
in the poultry course; Prof. W. D. 
Hurd, who is director of extension 
work and who will speak on the pro- 
duction of poultry feeds; Dr. James 
'' B. Paige. Professor of Veterinary 
Science, whose topic will be "The, 
Diseases of Poultry," Prof. Fred C. 
Sears, Professor of Pomology, who 
will have as his subject, "Small 
Fruits as an Adjunct of the Poultry 
Business"; Mr. C. S. Heller, in- ; 
structor in Vegetable gardening ; Clar- 
ence A. Jewett, superintendent of 
buildings, and quite a few others. 

POMOLOGY. 

Prof. Sears has just had placed in 
his office the head of a large buck 
which was shot on the Bay Road Fruit 
Farm last autumn. The buck weighed 
325 lbs. and the head was pronounced 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



Wright 
& Ditson 

Football and Hasketball suits 
the standard at all leading 
colleges. The WrigJit & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
( iuards the best and most pract- 
ical, also Skates and Hockey 
Goods. The Wright & Dit- 
JL son Sweaters have 
•^rffl long bet n recognized 
m W as the best. 

<£> College Students and Athletes 

(^J*" who want the real, superior 

■«.. s*^ articles for the different sports 

»■••«'«> should get the kind that bear 

our trade-mark. Catalogue Jree. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

22 Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cat. 

76 Wevbosset Street, Providence, R. I 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 

Agent for Laundry, H. W. Blaney, 'n. 
C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, E. L. Winn, 87 
Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursdays. 
Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Hldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



by the taxidermist who mounted it, one 
of the best he had seen for years. 
This buck was one of a herd of deer 
whose browsing of young trees has 
made It necessary to reset six acres of 
two-year-old orchard trees on his farm, 
and yet the sentimentalists want the 
present deer law repealed so as to do 
away with the open season of six days! 
The nursery stock has been ordered 
for setting a block of six acres of or- 
chard at the west end of the Harlow 
farm. Several interesting types of 
planting will be used One will con- 
sist of Stoddard apple trees at 40 ft. . 
dwarfs and doncln stock at 20 ft. and 
dwarfs on paradise stock at 10 ft. 
Another will be a close planted block 
of early bearing standard apple trees 
at 10ft using Wealthy, Wagener and 
Oldenburg, still another section will 
have Baldwins as permanent trees at 
40 ft. with Mcintosh as semi-perman- 
ents and Wealthy and Oldenburgs as 
fillers bringing the trees down to 
20 ft. apart esch way. This last sec- 
tion will bt: used to demonstrate differ- 
ent types of pruning — summer vs. 
winter vs. no pruning; and also in com- 
paring sod, mulch and cultivation. 



FATIMA 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only Jrom 1 A. M. to 4 A.M. 



Great River Water Power Co. 

E. A. cV* S. A. ALLEN, l'>»/><. 
Office, Gillett Block. 

WESTFIED, MASS. 



ROOMS WITH HEAT, 
POWER* LIGHT 

F*0 I* R 1& KT 



BALED SHAVINGS 

put up in attractive shape, 

in car lots. 

PRICE ON APPLICATION 

FRANK S. 0'bRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND MACK 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 

8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAlVfPTON, - - MASS. 

Telephone 



ALUMNI NOTES 

NOTICE 

The annual meeting and dinner of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Allumni club of Massachusetts will be 
held at the Parker House, Boston, on 
Friday Feb. 3. 1911. Meeting at 
600 p. m.. dinner at 7-00 p. m. 
Alumni, former students, and present 
officers of the college are invited. 

R. J. Watts. 

'04.— R. R. Raymouth is attracting 
a great deal of attention on the Pacific 
Coast through his singing. 

'06. — Francis D. Wholly is with 
the Metropolitan Park Commission, 
Room 505, 14 Beacon St., Boston. 

'09.— G. M. Codding, Landscape 
Architect, with Brown Bros. Co.. 
Welland County. Ont. 

'09. — Richard B. Potter has just 
taken a position as military instructor 
and teacher of chemistry in the Wis- 
consin Agricultural college at Racine, 
Wis. 

'10. — Fiske writes, "Louis C. 
Brown is stationed somewhere north 
of Luzon (in the Philippine Islands) ; 
address him in the care of the Bureau 
of Constabulary, Manila. P. I." 

'10. — Vinton's address is Middle- 
brook Farm, not Ferry, Dover, N. H. 

'10. — H. T. Cowles, San Juan High 
school, San Juan, Porto Rico. 

'10. — J. N. Everson with American 
Agricultural Chemical Co., Empire 
Carbon Works, East St. Louis, Mo. 

Ex-'II.-R. H. Armstrong, Bilt- 
more Forestry School, Darmstadt, 
Germany, 



TURKISH 

BLEND «S 

CIGARETTES 









■. 




LAW 




With each package of 
lalimu uou net •> pen- 
nanl coupon. 25 of 
whiih ifcuir a hand- 
mm • frit col leg- pen- 
nant (12x32) — telec- 
tion of 1 00. 



$ 



Judge Fatimas on merit 
and they'll acquit them- 
selves well. 

The college man's ver- 
dict is: "Distinctively in- 
dividual. * Therefore 
Fatimas are the favorite of 
students. 

If you will try Fatima 
you will continue to buy 
them. Inexpensively 
packed and you get ten ad- 
ditional. 20 for 1 5 cents. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 



■ 






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Gold Medal Corn 

The Only Gold Medal 

Givtfl at tin < l rand New England Corn Ex- 
position held at Worcester, Mass., Nov. 7th to 
■ 2th, was awarded to Hon. Theodore C. Bates 

of North Hrookfield, Mass. 

For CROP and for EXHIBIT 

Those who visited the Corn Kxposition will recall the Great Pyramid and 
Great Cone of Corn near the entrancr. 

There mere 3,000 Perfect Ears of Corn on the Cone 

none of them less than 12 inches lon^. 

There mere 2,000 Perfeet Ears of Corn on the Pyramid 

from 12 1-2 to 14 inches loag, 

On One Acre of Flint Corn Mr. Bates Raised One Hundred Seventy- 
Three and Three-Tenths (173.3) Bushels of Ears, Weighing 70 Pounds 
to the Bushel. 

Allowing 43 per cent for moisture and cob, and reducing to 12 per cent 
moisture basis (average moisture in crih dry corn) we find that Mr. Mates 
produced 

One Hundred Forty and Three-Tenths (140.3) Bushels of Shelled 
Corn per Acre ; 56 pounds of shelled < orn to the bushel. 

The yield was certified by three competent men as sworn to by them before 
the clerk of the courts at Worcester. 

The Worcester Magazine says : 

•« The Authorities at the Corn Show give this Yield the Credit of 
Excelling any Record of Flint Corn In this Country." 

Truly a wonderful tribute to Mr. Hates' skill as a farmer, to New England 
Soil, and to 

PERUVIAN VEGETABLE GROWER 

with which this remarkahle crop was raised. 

MANUKA! TUKKI) ONI.V HY 



THECOE MORTIMER CO 

Sole Manufacturers of K. Hank Coe fertilizers 
and Peruvian brands, Special Importers of Genu- 
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24-26 Stone St., New York City. 

If you have not received a copy of our handsome 
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send you one if you mention the COLLEGl Signal.. 




8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 3 '. '9"- 



pi. J. limit, Inc. 



THE 



Proprietors of 



iirhiiiar uitE 

Kear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 

Tel. i8j. 




ASK YOUR 

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Send for samples of Kngraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
lianquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

Ward's ""/oTton 8 "'"' 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers a thorough training in agricultural 
vocations that are not yet overcrowded, 
and in which there are constantly increas- 
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NECESSARY EXPENSES MODERATE 

LOCATION OF COLLEGE IDEAL 

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AMHERST, MASS. 



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'THERE IS A REASON." 



The College Senate, 
Athletic Board, 
Football Association, 
Track Association, 
Hockey Association, 
Tennis Association, 
Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 
Y. M. C. A., 
Fraternity Conference, 
Musical Association, 
Stockbridge Club, 
Rifle Club. 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society. 
1 Debating Society. 
Public Speaking Council, 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

H. W. Blaney, President 
Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 
J. F. Adams, Manager 
R. W. Piper, Manager 
G P. Nickerson, Manager 
J. M. Heald, Manager 
F. A. Castle, Manager 
R. W. Wales, President 
I. W. Davis, President 
H. C. Walker, Manager 
N. H. Hill, President 
A. H. Sharpe, President 
J. E. Dudley. Jr.. President 
R. C. Barrows. President 
1. C. Gllgore, President 



R C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

AH work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Frkssin<;, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

ticket svsrmM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish'* 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



, I Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

EDWARD L. HAZIEN. 14 Blankets Sheet s, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 
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JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 

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BOYDEN'S 

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Catering 
a Specialty 

1 96-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 




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Leave AUCJIE COLLEdE lor HOL- 
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Special Cars at Reasonable Hates 

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Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



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consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



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Daily, %8. Sunday, $2. Weekly, */■ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*< • CP 

Vol. \;<V 



SSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL. COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 14, 1911. 



No. 17 



sfw*" 



HOCKEY 



RIFLE SHOOT 



Team Wins from Yale but Loses to M. A. C. Team Wins from Columbia 
Dartmouth. by Close Score. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural 
college hockey team defeated the Yale 
team at New Haven, four to one, last ! 
Wednesday. The M. A. C. players 
completely outclassed their opponents 
during the entire game. Yale was not I 
able to score until the second half. ' 
Aggie ran up two goals in the first 
period and an equal number in the ] 
second. The Elis were swept off their | 
feet from the very outset, and within 
fifteen seconds M. A. C. scored their 
first goal by a team trick. Jones 
caged this first point for the Aggie 
team. The defensive work of Captain 
Adams was especially brilliant. 
Hutchinson and Peckham each scored 
a goal in the succeeding minutes of 
play which, with another by Jones, 
made the game safe. The M. A. C. 
goal-tender, Ackerman, put up a fine 
exhibition. Although outclassed, Yale 
put up a good game which was inter- 
esting to watch. Captain Loutrel 
scored Yale's only goal near the close 
of the second period. The game was 
played on the courts of the New Haven 
Lawn Club. 



The summary: — 




M. A. C. 


YALE. 


Wooley, lw 


lw, Merritt 


Jones, r 


r, Loutrel (Captain) 


Hutchinson, c 


c. Cox 


Peckham. rw 


rw, Harmon 


Needham, cp 


cp, Swenson 


Adams (Captain), p 


p, Brooks 


Ackerman, g 


g, Carhart 



Score — Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege 4, Yale 1. Coals — Jones 2, Peckham. 
Hutchinson, Loutrel. Referee— Tilney of 
Yale. Time of periods — 20 minutes. 

In the midst of a winter carnival 
Dartmouth added another victory to 
her credit by defeating our hockey 
team by a 4-0 score. The team 
felt the effects of the game with Yale, 
and showed that they were seriously 
handicapped by the lack of practice. 
The team was somewhat slow in start- 
ing and though they handled the puck 
very well yet they could not seem to 
make their team work count as did 
Dartmouth. The reputation for team 
work made at New Haven last Wed- 
nesday was not lived up to and our 
defense was not so effective as that of 
Dartmouth. 

The game started at three o'clock 
and the puck was immediately carried 
into our opponent's territory, where 
it stayed almost continually for the 
first half of this period. 

After four minutes of playing S. 
Eaton was penalized one minute and 
soon Patten was prevented from play- 
ing for a two-minute period. Need- 

[Contioued oa pat* 2] 



Washington, February 4. The re- 
sults of the matches in the Intercolle- 
giate Rifle Shooting League for the 
week ending February 4 discloses the 
State University of Iowa adding 
another victory to its credit, and also 
having the honor of making the record 
total of 1891 out of a possible 2,000 
points, which is the highest score that 
has been made in the league matches 
so far; its opponent — Purdue Univer- 
sity being defeated by 188 points 
The Columbia University of New 
York City is keeping up its splendid 
work by making the second highest 
total for the week of 1883 points, and 
incidentally defeating Louisiana State 
University. Columbia seems sssured 
of the non-military championship 
trophy, as the other non-mllltary col- 
lege in the League, Dartmouth, is 
not showing the same shooting form. 
Columbia is also making a strong bid 
for the championship of the United 
States, the State University of Iowa 
and Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege being the only ones likely to give 
them a set back in in the race. The 
Rhode Island State College Is able to 
place a virtory to its cred't by defeat- 
ing the North Georgia Agricultural 
College by a large margin, 

The results of the matches shot dur- 
ing the past week are as follows: 

The University of Iowa, 1891 vs. 
Purdue University, 1703; Golumbla 
University, 1883, vs, Louisiana State 
University, no report ; Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, l825, vs. Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1664; Wash- 
ington State College 1766, vs. Dart- 
mouth College, 1701 ; Cornell Uuiver- 
slty 1755, vs. Princeton University, 
1607; Rh^de Island State College, 
1671, vs. North Georgia Agricultural 
College. I486; New Hampshire Col- 
lege, 1682, vs. University of Arizona, 
1617; Missouri State Military School, 
1712, vs. University of California, no 
report. 

Standing of the clubs for the week 
ending Feb. 4, as follows; — 
State Univeraity of Iowa, 4 
Columbia University, 4 

Massachusetts Agricultural 

College. 4 o 

Princeton University, 3 I 

Cornell University. 3 I 

Washington State College, 3 1 
Missouri State Military 

School, 3 I 

Purdue University, 2 2 

Louisiana State University, 2 2 
New Hampshire College, 2 

Dartmouth College, 1 3 



fConrtmiad on oars 2.1 



FARMERS' WEEK 

Interesting Program Arranged for An- 
nuly Event. 

The annual "farmers" week will be 
held this year from March 13th to 17th 
for which a very instructive and prac- 
tical program has been arranged. The 
exercises have been divided into three 
divisions: horticulture, general agri- 
culture and a women's section. Mon- 
day the 13th will be devoted to the 
general welcome. President Butter- 
field will give the opening address of 
welcome, followed by George S. Ladd 
of Sturbridge who will speak on "What 
the College has done and is doing for 
the former." On Tuesday the section 
on agriculture will be addressed by 
the following: "Home-grown Pro- 
tein," Prof. S. B. Haskell ; " Some 
Problems !n Maintaining Soil Fertil- 
ity," Dr. W. E. Taylor of Moline. 
III.; "Potato Growing," Prof. W. D. 
Hurd ; demonstration of stock judging 
and scoring, Prof. J. A. McLane. 
The section of Horticulture will have 
the following ptogram: "Garden 
Designs," Prof. F.A.Waugh, "Trees 
and Shrubs for Home Use," Prof. 
E. A. White; "Hardy Annuals and 
Perennials," E. J. Canning of North- 
ampton ; apple judging contest. Fol- 
lowing to the Tuesday program for the 
women's section: "Chemistry of 
Foods and Nutrition," Prof. Joseph 
Chamberlain; "Menus and Table Ser- 
vice," and demonstratlbn of cookery 
and the preparation of a luncheon, 
Miss Bertha E. Shapleigh, of Colum- 
bia University. On Tuesday evening 
there will be a concert by the college 
orchestra and addresses by Hon. J. 
Lewis Ellsworth, secretary of the state 
board of agriculture and Dr. H. J. 
Weller of Cornell. 

On Wednesday, which is dairy day, 
the Massachusetts Creamery associ- 
tion and the Connecticut Valley 
Breeders' association will meet at the 
college. Lectures will be given by 
Elmer D. Howe of Marlboro, a trus- 
tee of the college, Prof. J. M. True- 
man of Storrs, Conn, and P. M. Har- 
wood of the dairy bureau. The hor- 
ticultural section has the following 
program which will consist of addresses 
by Prof. C. S. Wilson of Cornell and 
Professor Sears and Professor Fernald 
of the college. Miss Frances Stern 
of Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy and Miss Helen Louise Johnson of 
Goad Housekeeping, Springfield will 
speak to the women's section. 

Thursday, "corn day," the follow- 
ing will discuss the corn question: 
Henri D. Haskins of the Experiment 
Station, Professor Brooks and Pro- 
fessor Foord of the college and Prof. 

fConllnusd op osr* 2 1 



"The Private Secretary" 

8-15 P. M. THURSDAY 
TOWN HALL 



TRACK 

Relay Team Wins at Providence and 
Boston. 

Saturday, Jan. 28th, the track 
team went to the Armory Athletic 
Association meet at Providence, R. I. 
The papers are loud in their praise of 
the "Aggie Star," Dave Caldwell. 
Although Caldwell lost the three mile 
run his final spurt coming at the end 
of the race when the other men were 
worn out. was the feature oi the meet. 
The spurt however, came to late In 
the race to wear down the lead held 
by Maguire of the Providence A. C. 
who had a thirty yard handicap on Cald- 
well. The result was as follows : 

Three mile run, open handicap 
Won by H. F. Maguire of the T>rov- 
idence Athletic club(80 yds.) , second, 
D. S. Caldwell. Massachusetts (50 
yds.) ; third, L. Tlngley, Pawtucket 
Y. M. C. A. (70 yds.). Time— 15 
mln. 58 3 5 sec. 

The relay race between Massachu 
setts and Rhode Island State was 
clearly Massachusetts' from the start. 
Nielson, our first man, brought in a 
lead to Smith who gained on his man 
leaving a substantial lead U r Ciapp 
who handed a safe distance to our last 
man Barrows who led at the finish by 
35 yds. The race was as follows \ 
Relay race Rhode Island State 
(Newton, Reiner, Hawkins. Barlow ) 
vs. Massachusetts State (Neilson. 
Smith, Clapp, Barrows). Time — 2 
min. 56 3-5 sec. 

This is a good beginning and although 
we have no veterans on the relay 
team this race shows that we can 
depend on the material we have to 
uphold the standard set by the last 
year's team. 

Once more our relay team showed 
Its heels to the fast Worcester "Tech" 
team. It was a race almost exactly 
like the Rhode Island State race. 
Nielson, our firs' man, took the lead 
from the start and increased it to six 
feet. Porter, Worcester's second 
man, lost a little ground to Caldwell, 
while Clapp gained on Donath. Halli- 
gan, Tech's anchor, gained steadily on 
Barrows, trailing at his heels until the 
last lap when Barrows pulled away 
from him, making the time of 3 min- 
utes, 14 1-5 seconds, which was bet- 
ter than the majority of the relays. 
The summary — Massachusetts (Niel- 
son, Caldwell. Clapp, Barrows) vs. 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Hal- 
ligan, Porter, Donath, Halligan). 
Time 3 minutes, 14 1-5 seconds. 

In the 40-yard dash Nielson, the 
Massachusetts entry, tied for first 
place in the third heat, with Wlngate 






[Coattmiaa on pats 4] 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 14, 19 ' '■ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 14, 1911. 






HOCKEY 

[Continued from flrit p«g«] 



ham, while carrying the puck, collided 
with Wells with such force that both 
were knocked out for several minutes. 
Needham received a rather severe 
Injury on his head and though he con- 
tinued in the game for a few minutes 
yet he was soon forced to retire in 
favor of Sanctuary. Wells scored the 
first goal by a rather long shot after 
ten minutes of playing. From then 
on, until near the end of the period 
both goal keepers were kept on the 
alert. With a minute and a half to 
play Dartmouth scored a second goal 
and the period ended with two points 
in Dartmouth's favor. 

In the second period both teams 
started off with a jump and showed 
good team work and fast playing on 
both sides. This period though some- 
what rough, was full of fast spurts both 
of team work and individual playing. 
The Green scored twice in the middle 
of this period and during this half 
Sanctuary received our only penalty. 
The score: 

DARTMOUTH. M. A. C. 

Wells, f f. Wooley 

F. Eaton, f «, Jones 

S. Eaton, f f Hutchinson 

Stucklen, f f. Peckham, Sanctuary 
Patten, Huhman.cp cp, Needham, Peckham 

Bullard, p p. Adams 

Norris, g g. Ackerman 

Score— Dartmouth 4, M. A. C. 0. Goals 
—Wells 3. Stucklen. Referees— Cabot and 
•■ ' T -3 i and Irwin. 

Attendance — 



FARMERS' WEEK 

[Continued from first p*c»l 



F. W. Taylor of New Hampshire 
State college. An open discussion 
will then be held at which G. E. Tay- 
lor of Shelburne, P. E. Davis of 
Granby, H. S. Chapin of Sheffield. E. 
S. Fulton of Amherst, and G. E. 
Stickney of Newburyport, will tell 
••How we grow our Prize Corn." 
Prof. F. W. Taylor will then judge a 
corn show. Lectures will follow by 
Mr. Heller, Prof. F. F. Moon, and 
Prof. G. E. Stone. The women's 
section will be entertained by Miss 
Flora Macdonald of Boston and Mrs. 
Mary S. Woolman of Columbia. 
During the evening C. H. White will 
tell "How the College helps the 
Farmer" and Hon. C. C. James of 
Toronto, "What Canada is Doing for 
Her Farmers." 

Friday will be devoted to the ques- 
tion of the betterment of the rural 
community. Following an open dis- 
cussion the following program will take 
place; "The School that Helps build 
the Community," W. E. Riley, super- 
intendent of the Dalton and Hinsdale 
public schools ; "The Amherst School 
Alliance," Mrs. Arthur J. Hopkins; 
"The Community," Miss Zadie 
Brown of the Massachusetts Library 
Commission; "The Church that Helps 
Build the Community," Mrs. Marga- 
ret Barnard of Rowe ; "The Grange 
as a Help," Mrs. Margaret Wright, 



lecturer of Billerica Grange; "The 
Amherst Social Service League," 
Prof. F. B. Loom is of Amherst col- 
lege; "The Sandwich Town Better- 
ment League," Mrs. Elizabeth Jen- 
kins; "The Federation and Co-opera- 
tion for Rural Progress," President 
K. L. Butterfield. 

During the exercises, Wilder Hall 
will be for the use of women who may 
attend and light luncheons will be 
served there. The basement of South 
will be used for the exhibits of dairy 
implements and products, the corn 
exhibits will be in the new animal 
husbandry building while the Entomo- 
logical building will be devoted to 
exhibits of household conveniences and 
demonstrators will be in attendance. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE RIFEE 
SHOOTING. 

[Continued from first p»K«- 1 

University of Minnesota, 1 
Rhode Island State College, 1 
University of Arizona, 
N. Georgia Agricultnral Col- 
lege, 
University of California, 

Last Wednesday afternoon the M. 
A. C rifle team shot against Columbia. 
This shoot was the hardest that our 
team has yet participated in. The 
Columbia team, Iowa State, and M. 
A. C. were tied for first place. After 
this victory over Columbia, it makes 
our team tied with Iowa for first place. 
The shoot against them does not come 
until the final meet of the year, In the 
latter part of April. In the Wednes- 
day shoot, our team beat Columbia 
1872 to 1844, a margin of twenty- 
eight points. The scores (unofficial) 
were as follows . 



UP - TO- DATE 




w 



PUMPS 

ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 

TENNIS SHOES 

EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S SHOE 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



THURBER'S 

COLLEGE LUNCH 



AMHBRMT, IVIA.«*I 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



Baker. H. J. 
Brett, A. C. 
Lloyd, E. R. 
McDongall. A. F. 
McLaughlin, F. A. 
Murray. J. K. 
Racicot, P. A. 
Sharpe, A. H. 
Stevenson, L. O. 
Walker. H. C. 



Off Hand. 


Prone. 


Totali. 


84 


97 


181 


96 


96 


192 


92 


97 


189 


87 


94 


181 


99 


93 


197 


90 


95 


185 


92 


98 


190 


91 


96 


187 


95 


93 


188 


89 


93 


182 



TRAVELING 

TOILET SETS 

NEW STYLES 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



CAP A GOWNS 



To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



915 957 1872 
Iowa won from Washington 1877 to 

1800. 
Cornell beat Louisiana 1714 to 1650. 
Dartmouth beat Princeton, 1698 to 

1623. 
Missouri beat Minnesota 1718 to 1637. 
Arizona won from North Georgia 1697 

to 1638. 

Rhode Island beat Purdue 1702 to 

1697. 

Saturday, Feb. 11, M. A. C. ran 

up a total of 1 828 In the shoot against 

Cornell. The whole team suffered a 

' relapse from the high record against 

Columbia. The individual scores 



Shaving Mirrors. 



The Prospect House 



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Clean, Airy Rooms 



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SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises, Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.*. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block, 



Phoenix Row 



The WonTHY. 



FRANK WKHHER, M<R 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



DRAMATIC SOCIETY NOTES 

The Drematic Society will present 
:The Private Secretary, a farcical com- 
edy in three acts, at the Town Hall, 
; Amherst, on Thursday evening next, 
at eight-fifteen o'clock. This is the 
first attempt of the society to stage a 
production here In Amherst and It Is 
hoped that the student body will lend 
its heartiest support. Rehearsals have 
been held with a certain amount of 
regularity since October frst. The 
cast has been picked with careful dis- 
crimination and thanks to the thorough 
and efficent coaching of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jas. K. Mills, a first class production 
Is confidently expected. On occount 
of the very imperfect stage equipment 
of the Town Hall, It will be impossible 
to stage the piece with the amount of 
perfection which would be possible to 
acquire were efficient scienic appara- 
tus provided. It is hoped, however, 
that the audience will make due allow- 
ance for this discrepancy. Tickets 
for the production are on sale at 
Deuel's Drug Store, Amherst, and 
may also be procured from E. B. 
Young, 1912. 

The question which arises now is; 
will the Dramatic Society have a 
future in M. A. C? The present 
management hopes to retire leaving 
the society an amount sufficient to 
cover all initial expenses of next season. 
A successful beginning has been made 
and it rests with the new management 
as well as with students and faculty 
whether or not the season of 1911-12 
will be a success. There is no reason 
why a successful future should not be 
forthcoming. With the society firmly 
founded, it is a simple matter for it to 
grow in strength and efficiency, The 
college is of sufficient size and conse- 
quence to suppert such an organization, 
and now that one has been founded, it 
rests with the student body and faculty 
to promote it thus making it an honor 
to the college of which it forms a part. 



Amherst Corner Ik Rathskellar. 

YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



OF 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 



were : 

Baker, H. J. 
Brett, A. C. 
Edminister, A. F. 
Lloyd, E. R. 
McDougall, A. F. 
McLaughlin, F. A. 
Murray, J. K. 
Racicot, P. A. 
Sharpe, A H. 
Walker, H. C. 

Totals, 



Off Hand 
89 
90 
89 
84 
91 
91 
91 
95 
88 
88 



Prone 

95 

97 

91 

94 

90 

97 

94 

95 

97 

82 



8% 932 



Total 
184 
187 
180 
178 
187 
188 
185 
190 
185 
170 

1828 



Drug Store 



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why YOU should buy 

O O A L 



lioais 4 Ci 



TOBACCO 




HOUSE WARMING. 

Kappa Gamma Phi entertained last 
Friday evening at a housewarrring in 
its new quarters on Mt. Pleasant. 
Delegates were present from the other 
fraternities and several of the faculty 
were In evidence. The gathering 
took the form of a smoker, and light 
refreshments consisting of punch and 
fancy crackers were served. Cards, 
music and readings were enjoyed. The 
party broke up with "Old Mass'chu- 



setts. 



SIGNAL STANDING FEB. 6 



Carpenter 21.07 
Williams 20.26 
Harlow 
Hutchins 



AT 



or 



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Zabriskie 
Anderson 

Clark 

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Damon 

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13.26 
4.75 

25.16 
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CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C, students 
with the 

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The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
k Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



£&rp*rvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No. i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Established 




1851 



>**«***• 



Eimer & Amend 



205-21 X Third Ave, Cor. 1 8th St. 



New York 



Headquarters For 



Chemicals, Chemical, Physical, Bacteriological 
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We carry the largest stock of Laboratory Supplies in the U. S. 

PROMPT SERVICE 



Our European connections are such that we are enabled to offer you 
the best service for duty-free importations on scientific supplies at the 
lowest prices. 



The College Signal, Tucnday, February 14, '9" 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 14, 191 1. 




THEJOLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tueedey evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 
EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, EdKor-ln-ChW. 

HAROLD F. WILLARD. 1911. Maaaftnt Editor 
IRVING W. DAVIS, 1911. Ahimnl N<Xe». 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY, 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYALN.HALLOWELL.19I2, AwUttnt Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912 College Notes. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Department Notes. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
PARK W. ALLEN, 1911, Busineae Meiuger 

ALBERT W.DODGE. 1 9 1 2. Aeet. Bustneat Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURC. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN, Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per y«* r - Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered aa ■eoond-cleet 
Peel Office 



matter at the Amherat 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, FEB. 14. No. 17 



NOTICE. 

All men interested in boxing are 
asked to meet in Trophy Room, Tues- 
day, Feb. 14, 1911, at 6-45 o'clock. 



At the beginning of each semester 
a new schedule appears. Previous to 
this year, elective blanks furnished the 
upper classes and the schedule com- 
mittee an opportunity for a working 
basis. The committee, however, 
state that rarely over sixty or seventy- 
five per cent of these blanks were 
returned and for this semester they 
were used only for sophomore elec- 
tives. Formerly, if conflicts occurred 
and one went to the faculty, he was 
asked if he had made his elections and 
if he hadn't, the conflicts were his 
fault alone. If he had, there was no 
help, as the majority of the class must 
be suited. Now there is very little 
syst-m in making the schedule and 
small chance for being without or get- 
ting around conflicts. 

There seems to be two possible 
remedies: the first, Saturday work, 
and the second, a division of the col- 
lege into groups and separate sched- 
ules for each group. The first would 
be but a temporary help, so the second 
appeals as the better. Schedules for 
Horticulture and Agriculture groups 
could be made and then a student 
would first elect a grcup and later the 
subjects within it. In this way, it 
seems as if there would be much less 
cause for conflicts between a major 
and essential minor subjects. 

COLLEGE NOTES 

Prof. A. E. Cance addressed the 
Granby grange Tuesday evening, the 
7th, on "Immigration and the Labor 

Problem." 

Assistant Professor McKay attended 
a National Dinner of the University of 
Michigan at the Hotel Astor, New 
York, last Saturday evening. 

The article upon "Administrative 
Conditions at the State College," 
published by the Springfield Union 
Sunday, Feb. 5, was written by Pro- 
fessor Neal. 



The Sophomore class has elected 
the following associate editors to the 
Index board: J. D. French of Hyde 
Park, CM. Packard of Springfield, 
S. M. Jordan of Rutherford.N. J. and 
George Zabriskie 2nd of Rutherford, 
N.J. 

The Junior class met last week and 
elected the following officers to serve 
during the next semester : President, 
Arthur F. Kingsbury of Medfleld; 
vice-president, Jesse Carpenter, Jr.. 
of Attleboro ; secretary and treasurer, 
Marshall C. Pratt of Lowell ; class 
captain, Howard H. Wood, of Shel- 
burne Falls; Sergeant-at-Arms, 
Charles E. Whitney of Wakefield; 
historian, Edwin B. Young of Dor- 
chester. 

President Butterfield was unable to 
preside at the opening chapel exercise 
of the second semester, because of 
his absence, at the National Corn show 
at Columbus, 0. The speaker was 
Rev. J. J. Gravett who is in charge 
of student work in the Episcopal 
church. He spoke interestingly on the 
necessity for the development of the 
physical, mental and spiritual side of 
the student. 

On Feb. 4th, the Chinese students 
of Amherst met at H. D. Fearing's 
home on Pleasant street to celebrate 
New Years. After a Chinese banquet 
of Oriental dainties prepared under 
the direction of some of the students 
a fine program of toasts were re- 
sponded to. D. Y. Lin spoke on the 
"Significance of the past year in 
Cfiina." W. Y. Chun responded to 
"Chinese Students in Amherst." 
After the banquet many neighbors and 
friends including Professor and Mrs. 
W. D. Hurd joined the party and spent 
a very enjoyable evening. 

Prof. Frank A. Waugh of this col- 
lege gave a talk before the members 
of the farmers' institute of the Middle- 
sex North Agricultural society, at 
Westford, recently. He spoke on the 
subject "Apple Raising." Professor 
Waugh treated his subject in a rather 
informal but entertaining manner and 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 




EWELL'S 



A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 
know that their shoes are 

right. 
Prices $350, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94 4 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



Clapp, '12. 



Beers, '12. 



We have a full line of Manners, 1'ost 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



M.D. OILMAN. 

TELEPHONE 



C. A. MOFFET. 

1079-3. 



GILMAN and MOFFET, 



at its close he was given a hearty vote Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealer* 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



of thanks. Professor Sears had been 
scheduled to give this talk but a severe 
cold prevented him from attending, so 
Professor Waugh kindly offered his 
services. He used several small trees 
at the front of the stage for dem- 
onstration. 

The Massachusetts experiment sta- 
tion is sending out bulletin No. 135 
relative to the inspection of commer- 
cial fertilizers for 1910. It summa- 
rizes the main points of the fertilizer 
law, states the number of fertilizers 
collected and analyzed, gives the trade 
values of fertilizer ingredients, dis- 
cusses valuations, retail cost prices 
' and percentages of difference. It 
makes clear the economy of buying 
only high grade fertilizers by showing 
the cost per pound of the several ele- 
ments in the different grades. Men- 
tion is made of all brands showing a 



IN 



CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Maim Street. 

Worcester, Mass. 




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HAIR DRESSING SALOON 



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WORKMANSHIP 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the A inherit Howie will receive 
prompt attention. 



noticeable commercial shortage and 
the tables of analysis give the detailed 
composition of all fertilizers sold in 
Massachusetts. Copies may be 
obtained upon application. 

wauch's new book. 
Professor Waugh 's new book was 
published during the past week by 
John Wiley & Sons of New York. It 
is a revision of an important English 
book which appeared first in 1850, and 
which has been favorably known In 
America as Kemp's Landscape Gard- 
ening. The work has been printed 
twice before in America from the old 
English plates, but the present is the 
first real American edition. Last 
summer Professor Waugh visited the 
former home of Edward Kemp to se- 
cure materials for this revision. 

trustee's action. 

The trustees of Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College have presented to the 
Legislature a bill which, if passed, will 
give them the authority to lease small 
parcels of land, owned by the College, 
to members of the College Faculty 
and the Experiment Station staff for 
the purpose of erecting dwellings for 
themselves, and also to fraternity cor- 
porations. 

The difficulty which employes of 
the College find in securing quarters 
has become so acute that the trustees 
have been led to take this step. The 
buildings erected on this leased land 
will be subject to local taxation the 
same as if they wete on private land. 
It Is thought that this plan will not in- 
terfere with the erection of houses by 
private individuals because, thus far, 
the demand is far beyond the supply. 

The trustees are also asking the 
Legislature for a dormitory. The 
plans for this building call for a dormi- 
tory of two stories, designed to house 
about fifty men. The trustees have 
not adopted a general policy of erect- 
ing dormitories, but had plans pre- 
sented to them which seemed to indi- 
cate that a modern dormitory can be 
built at much less expense than had 
been supposed. The erection ot this 
dormitory will, therefore, be some- 
what experimental. The increase of 
attendance at the College is rapidly ex- 
hausting the rooming facilities of the 
town, and even this small dormitory 
will hardly serve to give the accomo- 
dations needed. 



MUSICAL CLUBS AT MONTA 
GUE. 

On Friday evening of last week the 
college Glee and Mandolin Clubs pre- 
sented a very creditable concert in the 
Town Hall at Montague. The follow- 
ing program was rendered and was fol- 
lowed by dancing, the music for which 
was furnished by members from the 
clubs. 

Ppogram. 
"Courtship." Glee Club. 

"Campus Dreams " Walt?. Mandolin Club. 
Baritone Solo. Cobb 

Reading. Zabriskie 

Huntsman's Farewell," Clee Club. 

Cello Solo. Nicholet. 

Tenor Solo. French. 

Reading. Zabriskie. 

"Always More." Quartette. 

Kelvin Grove," Glee Club. 

Every Little Movement." Mandolin Club. 
Seranade. Glee Club. 

"Sons of Old Massachusetts" Glee Club. 

The concert was given under the 
auspices of the Montague Agricultural 
School and was well attended, the hall 
being comfortably filled. The mem- 
bers of the clubs were very hospitably 
cared for at the homes of various 
townspeople and returned to Amherst, 
the next morning. 



:>, 



Balanced and Specialized Fertilizers 



Well*balanced, specialized fertiliaara, containing the ri^ht amounts 

nf available nitrogen, in both chemical and organic forms, with an ex< 
of soluble and reverted phosphoric acid, both lor fertilising and c. Italy/ 

ins effects, sad teepropei amount and right form of potash, all thorough- 
ly olended tocether snd in forms test ami not cake, but remain in a 
rillable condition, and which will act not only in the beginning, but 
throughout the season (fertilizers based upon the needs of the crop and 
market requirements), are what the practical farmer should rely upon in 
growing commercial crops Above all things, he should avoid un- 
balanced snd improper mixtures UtSl have the defect of one element 
being inutlubU and another element /<><> soluble fm successful plant 
growth. Think of this when considering home mixing 

It is much the same with modern fertilizers as it is with motlt-n 
medicine. As a rule the best physicians do not send their patients to i 
drng store with perscriptions to be made up They are prescribing mix- 
tures already made up to certain known standards and formulas by 
large manufacturing drug houses of whom there are perhaps .1 do/on in 
the United States. In this way they get the drugs thev want, the lot 
mulas they want and the conditions in which they wain them. These 
formulas represent the crystallized experience of thousands of 
physicians in dealing with many conditions. In critical cases phvsi. isns 
00 not put their trusts in prescriptions made up in small lots ot uncsrtsifl 
chemicals by local druggists ( an the tanner afford to mix doses lot his 
CTOfJI even if he knows his ingredients 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



I. OT. LABROVITZ 



Till 



TRACK 

[Continued from page I .] 

Rollin of Roxbury Latin thus qualify- 
ing for the semi-finals. However, 
after "stealing" on the pistol three 
times In the semi-finals he was penal- 
ized his six-foot handicap making him 
a scratch man. His time, however, 
was as fast as any of the fifty entries. 
Dave Caldwell was sixth in the one 
mile run. This is a good showing, 
•onsidering that there were over fifty 
contestants representing the foremost 
colleges and athletic associations in 
the country. 



SPECIAL STATISTICS OF CLASS 
ENTERING IN SEPTEMBER, 

IQIO 

For the last three years, at the 
beginning of the fall term, there has 
been taken at the president's office a 
census of the students entering as 
freshmen. 

The number of freshmen in 1910, 
completing their registration was 158. 
Their statistics reveal the fact that 42 
or 26.58 per cent of these students 
come from towns of less than 3000 
inhabitants, that 32 or 20.35 per cent 
come from towns of between 3000 and 
10,000; this leaves over 53 per cent 
who come from cities and lajge towns. 
Eighty-five cities and towns of Massa- 
chusetts contribute !34 students to 
the incoming class, this number repre- 
senting 84.81 per cent of the total. 
Nine other states and one foreign 
country are also represented. All the 
counties in Massachusetts with the 
exception of Dukes and Nantucket are 
represented, Middlesex leading with 
23.13 per cent of the number from j 
Massachusetts, and Suffolk second 
with 14.15 per cent. Hampshire 
County, in which Amherst is located, 
sends 8.95 per cent. 

The records show that the fathers 
of 23.32 per cent of the students are 
engaged in some form of agriculture; 
18.98 per cent are artisans; 30.37 
per cent are in business ; 6.97 per 
cent are professional men ; the rest 1 
are deceased or employed in miscel- 
laneous occupations. 

The statements as to intended voca- 
tions of the freshmen indicate that 
70.87 per cent plan to train themselves 
for some Kind of work in practical or 
professional Agriculture and Horticul- 
ture. Engineering claims 5.70 per 
cent; the professions 1.26 per cent ; ( 



Leading Custom Tailor 

Full Dress Suits To Rent 

Suits and Overcoats To Order 
Always a large and select line of Foreign and homestii Wool, ns 

Dyeing, Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing a Specialty 

\ guaranteed tit in all the latest kinds ot garmenta. 

Renovated Suits For Sale. 
A first class line of dent's Furnishing (Joods always on hand. K. & V\ 
Collars and I Mess Shirts. Satisfaction guaranteed in every transaction 



1 1 Amity Street, 



Tel. 302-4. 



Amherst, Mass. 



H. W. FIELD v 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 



... FLORIST ... 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



PENS, and PICTURES. 

Tall in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



OPP. ACAIIKMV OF HUSK , 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 14, '9"- 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February i 4 , 19 



1 1 , 





21.16 percent are undecided. Thus 
over 91 per cent of those indicating a 

I r 

decision of future work contemplate 
•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•••.•.••••••••'•••••'•■•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•■•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•' following some vocation immediately 

related to the farm and country life. 

But 27.22 per cent of the entering 
class have been brought up upon 
farms, although over a half of those 
not reared on farms have had farm 
experience varying from a few weeks 
to two or three years in extent. 

The average age of the freshmen at 
the time of entrance was 19.07 years. 
58 25 per cent of the class applied for 
student labor. 

The statistics as tabulated for the 
classes entering in 1908 and 1909 
resemble very closely those obtained 
in 1910; thus they are fairly represen- 
tative of the student body as a whole 
The most noticeable difference is that 
this year the per cent of students com- 
ing from business homes is approxi- 
mately eight larger than in 1908, and 
twelve larger than in 1909. 

These complete statistics are 
printed in tabular form in the reports 
of the president of the college for the 
last three years. 




GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
*&Ji Reiser Cravats, 

&>'-£) English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 






THE OLD CORKER DRUG STORE. 



,.•,,•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.■.•.■.•.•.'.•.•.•.■.■••••••••.•.•.•.•.•.■.•.'.•.•.••••'.'•••.■.•.•.•.•.•.•. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



H. E. KINSMAN, 



FOR i- 1 YEARS OFFICIAL 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

AT WILLIAMS COLLEGE 

H.is just opened an up-to-date and thoroughly equipped 
Studio for High grade work, in the 

NASH BLOCK, MAIM STRCCT, WMHCRST 

Where absolute satisfaction is guaranteed every customer. 
All styles, up-to-date and prices reasonable. 



The place to have your -roup and single pictures taken correctly. Call 
and make your appointments. Visitors welcome. 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty <>f College Classes. 



PRELIMINARIES TO ANNUAL 
DEBATE 

The following is the schedule of the 
preliminaries to the Anuual Debate to 
be held March 8th: Debating club, 
Wednesday, at 7-00 o'clock; Fresh- 
man-Sophomore, Monday, Feb. 1 3th, 
at 8-00 o'clock ; Juuior-Senior, Tues- 
day, Feb. 14, at 7-00 o'clock. Con- 
tests will be held in Room G. Reg- 
ister as a contestant at once with I, 
C. Gilgore '11. or Professor McKay. 
Take either side of the question. 
Contestants will be given 7-8 minutes 
and if circumstances permit rebuttals 
will be called for. Watch for further 
notices. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



STKAM FITTIHG, Telephone 59—4. 

GAS PITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Liohts, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 

FOR FARMS ! 

Big. Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 
Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, - Mass « 



E.B. DICKINSON DD.S. 

D15NTAI. ROOMS 



Williams Block, Amhkkst, Mass. 

Omci Hours: 
etolSA.M.l>80to8P«M a 



CATALOGUE REQUESTS. 

During January, 1911, over 200 
written requests tor catalogs and sped 
fie information about the college were 
received at the President's office. 
For the period of seven months from 
June 1st to December 31, 1910, the 
average monthly number of such re- 
quests was over 140. 



Wright 
&Ditson 

Football and Ba>ketball suits 
the standard at all fading 
colleges. The Wright & 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
( iuards the best and mostpraet 
ieal. also Skates and Hocke) 
Goods. The Wright & Pit 

sou Sweaters ha:. 

lone been recognized 

as the best. 




RESOLUTIONS 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gtt adtnin- 
stered when desired 



Olvmpia Candv Co. 



. • College Students and Athletes 
who want the real, superior 
M, v^ articles for the different sports 
u. > -«r mn should get the kind that beat 
our trade-mark. Catalogue free. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

U4 Washington Street, Boston, Mass 

22 Warren Street, New York City 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal 

76 Wevbosset Street, Providence, R. I 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



257 Main Si., 
Northampton. 



Mas; 



Whereas. It hath pleased God in His in- 
finite wisdom to take unto Himself the 
father of our beloved friend. Milton L. 
Sibley, be it 

Resolved: that we, the members of the 
class of Nineteen Hundred and Fourteen. 
' do extend to him our sincere sympathy in 
his hour of sorrow ; and be it further 

Resolved: that a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to our beraved friend, and that a . • r»l 

copy be filed in the records of the class, J laundry Work and Cleaning 
and a copy be published in the Signal. . ~ . , , 

(Signed) & Pressing Rightly 

Thcodoke A. NicoLer. Secretary. Done 

For the class. 

Agent for Laundry, H. W. Hlaney, 
C. S. C. House. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



Agent for Pressing, K. L. Winn. 87 
Pleasant St. 



ALUMNI, NOTES 

Ex-'82. — Frank H. Joyner, since 
1898, division engineer of the state 
board of highway commissioners, has ; Team collects Mondays and Thuisil 

1 Delivers Thursdays and Saturda> 

recently accepted a position at a sal- Denver* ihww , 

ary of $6000 a year as superintendent 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
c arnations.violets and chysanthemums 
hi their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only Jrom 1 A. M. 104 A.M. 



Great River Water Power Go. 

E. A. 6> S. A. ALLEN, Props. 

Office, Gillett Block. 

WESTFIED, MASS. 



of all the highways in and about Los 
Angeles, Cal. and leaves for his new 
field of labor. Friends to the number 
of 26, in a private suite of rooms on 
the second floor of the American 
House, tendered him a farewell ban- 
quet. A course dinner of more than 
usual excellence was served. A feat- 
ure of the evening was the souvenir 
menu card. It consisted of four pages 
and was printed on heavy light blue 
cardboard. On the front cover was a 
half-tone picture of Mr. Joyner. 
Directly underneath it were the words 
"With kind regards" and just below 
that a line on which Mr. Joyner was 
required to write his name. Inside 
the card was the following original 
verse: 

ING 'EM OFF. 

He's off for California. 
So let's this message send : 
"No man is ever lonesome 
With Joyner for a friend." 

•94. _H. J. Fowler, agt-d 40, died 
Feb. 2 at 1 a m. after a three days 
Illness with pernicious anemia. 
Although he had complained of 
feeling ill for some time, he was 
able to continue his work until Satur- 
day night. He attended Hopkins 
academy for a short time and was 
graduated from M. A. C. in 1894. 
He was employed for a number of 
years In the work of exterminating the 
gypsy moth, and of late years had 
been a painter and paper hanger. 
About six years ago he married Kath- 
erine Maxwell of Hadley. who survives 
him, with a four-year-old daughter,! 
Dorothy. Three brothers, George of 
Orange, Frederick H. of Wayiand and 
William of Somerville also survive. 
The funeral was held Feb. 4 at 2 p. m 

'08. — L. K. Liang has passed the 
Imperial Examination for a Doctor's 
Degree a. Pekin, China. 



- M& — ■•■'•■.*■■,■■ 



FATIHA 



ROOMS WITH HEAT, 
POWER <£ LIGHT 

FOR K E> K T 



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TURKISH 

_J BLEND 

CIGARETTES 








Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 



8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, - - MASS 

Telephone 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

LIBRARY. 

H. B. Filer, M. A. C. '06, City 
Forester of the Buffalo Park Depart- 
ment has recently given to the Library 
a complete set of the Buffalo Park 
Commissioners' Reports. This set of 
reports makes a very desirable addition 
to the collection of Park Reports 
which is being built up for the benefit 
of the landscape gardening department. 
The Library has also recently received 
a large number of Park Reports from 
Hartford and Shade Tree Commission 
Reports from East Orange, N.J. 

'• Wrecked Lives."' 
Wrecked Lives or men who have 
failed. 920 Ad I. Two new volumes 
recently added to the Library. 

Very few of us would put down 
Thomas Wolssy. Dean Swift, Robert 
Burns or Edgar Aller. Poe as men who 
failed to "make good." The books 
mentioned, however, tell about Poe, 
Burns. Kosciusko and others whose 
lives were failures, at least from a 
Christian moralist's point of view. 



■ :... 



With each package of 
I alima you gel a pen- 
nant coupon, 25 of 
which tecure * hand- 
tome fell college pen- 
nant ( / 2x32) — telei - 
Hon of 100. 




ASTRONOMY 



In the Universe of ciga- 
rettes, Fatimas are stars of 
first magnitude, brightening 
the horizon of the college 
boys* life. They're differ- 
ent from others — widely 
different in taste and flavor. 

And the fellows appre- 
ciate their individuality. 
Like a meteor they've 
moved rapidly into favcr 
and like the sun they shine 
above all others. Inex- 
pensively packed in order 
to give you ten additional 
cigarettes 20 for 1 5 cents. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 






Gold Medal Corn 

The Only Gold Medal 

(.iven at tilt- Orand New hngland Corn Im- 
position held at Worcester, Mass, Nov 7tli to 
12th, was awarded to Hon. Theodore C Bates 
of North Brookfield, Mass. 

For CROP and for EXHIBIT 

Those who visited the Corn Exposition will recall the (ireat Pyramid and 
(ireat < 'one of Corn near the entrance. 

There uiere 3,000 Perfect Ears of Corn on the Cone 

none of them less than 12 inches long. 

There mere 2,000 Perfect Ears of Corn on the Pyramid 

from 12 1-2 to 14 inches loaf 

On One Acre of Flint Corn Mr. Bates Raised One Hundred Seventy- 
Three and Three-Tenths (173.3; Bushels of Bars, Weighing; 70 Pounds 
to the Bushel. 

Allowing 43 per cent for moisture and cob, and reducing to 12 per cent 
moisture basis (average moisture in crib dry corn) we find that Mi Bate* 
produced 

One Hundred Forty and Three-Tenths (140.3) Bushels of Shelled 
Corn per Acre ; 56 pounds of shelled corn to the bushel. 

The yield was certified by three competent men as sworn to by them before 
the clerk of the courts at Worcester. 

The Worcester Magazine says : 

•• The Authorities at the Corn Show give this Yield the Credit of 
Excelling any Record of Flint Corn in this Country." 

Truly a wonderful tribute to Mr. Hates" skill as a farmer, to New Kngland 
Soil, and to 

PERUVIAN VEGETABLE GROWER 

with which this remarkable crop was raised. 

MANUKA* TUKEI) ONI V HV 



THEME-MORTIMER CO 

Sole Manufacturers of K. h rank Coe Fertilisers 
and Peruvian Brands, Special Importers of Genu- 
ine Thomas Phosphate Powder. 

24-26 Stone St., New York City. 

If you have not received a copy of our handsome 
Annual MEMORANDUM book we shall be glad to 
•end you one if you mention the College Signal 



■EXC£U.£NC£,A 
*- or _, 
DISPLAY 



\ * 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 14. 19 1 



ID. J. Upoiie, inc. 



I'roprietois of 



HUrO— L1VEBY-H0BSE 



Tel. 183. 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 




Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Knvelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kngraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

WTck rH *C 57 " 63 Franklin Street, 
TT «1 KM O BOSTON. 



ALL OF THE 

VARSITY MEN 

and most of the upperclassmen 
wear 

DUDLEY 

HAND KNIT 

Shaker Sweaters 



'THERE IS A REASON. 



a<;knt for 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



AT M. A. C. 



THE 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers a thorough training in agricultural 
vocations that are not yet overcrowded, 
and in which there are constantly increas- 
ing opportunities for employment. 

NECESSARY EXPENSES MODERATE 

LOCATION OF COLLEGE IDEAL 

ATTENDANCE RAPIDLY INCREASING 

For complete catalog or specific informati- 
on, write to 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST, MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Dramatic society, 

Debating Society, 

Public Speaking Council, 



H. W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

1. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill, President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

J. E. Dudley, Jr., President 

R. C. Barrows, President 

I. C. Gilgore, President 



EDWARD l_. HAZEN, '14 



BASSALOTTI & GENTASO 

FRUIT, 

CONFECTIONERY. 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

BRICKS TO TAKE HOME. 
i.URNER AMITY & PLEASANT STREETS 



JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLEX 




Boot & Shoes Repaired 

FIRST CLASS WORK 

Amherst, - Mass. 



THE H. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters ani Entomologists 



STAMFORD, CONN. 



BOYDEN'S 



Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

1 96-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426. Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Amherst, Mass. 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST, MASS. 

COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKKT SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. K. Roberts. 



CARS 



Leave AOU1E COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. paat each 
HOUR. 

Special Can at Reasonable Rates 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. RY. CO 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, %3. Weekly, $/■ 



THE COLLEGE 



LUrRATiV of th. 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol.. XXI. 



HOCKEY RESU1 ! § THE PRIVATE SECRETARY AMHERST DEFEATED 



Season Remarkably Successft 
Victories, Two Revers 




Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 21, io* 1 - 



No. 18 



Zabriskie "13 Stars in the Production of 
Dramatic Club. 



The hockey season just cl J52£ by 
far the most successful season any 
athletic team representing the college 
has ever had. Playing a schedule 
which was criticized at the beginning 
of the season because it was too hard 
including as It did, teams representing 
colleges and universities much larger 
than we are, the team surprised the 
college in a more than satisfying man- 
ner. With barely a week's practice, 
the team was taken to Wllliamstown 
to meet the crack Williams seven who 
so badly defeated our team last year. 
Great was the rejoicing that our team 
was victorious in its first game oi the 
season by the score of six to three, 
outclassing the Berkshire boys in every 
department of the game. VanGorder, 
the Williams rover, who Is classed as 
one of the best college forwards of the 
time was able to shoot only one goal 
while Jones, our forward succeded in 
shooting two. The other striking point 
of the game was the playing of the 
freshman, three of whom had then 
made the team, Jones and Hutchin- 
son each shooting two goals while 
Needham put up a faultless game at 
cover point. The outcome of this 
game gave us a great deal of confi- 
dence in our team which later showed 
that It was not misplaced. 

The Thursday preceding the Christ 
mas vacation the fast Springfield 
Training School team played on the 
campus rink. The two teams were 
about equal in weight and the game 
was fast and scrappy although our team 
was in the lead. The score at the 
finish was six to three. Wooley, the 
fourth freshman to make the team 
made his debut in this game, proving 
himself to be a find Indeed. Bowers 
of Springfield was the star of his team 
as he was exceedingly fast although 
he was unable to shoot effectively. 

January seventh the team went to 
Hartford where It defeated Trinity by 
the score of six to two. The team 
was handicapped by the rink which was 
decidedly under the minimum size al- 
lowed In the rules. The Ice, too, was 
exceedingly soft making fast or specta- 
cular playing impossible. 

The next game was played at the 
Empire City rink at Albany with the 
team from Rennsalaer Polytechnic 
Institute. This was a one sided game, 

fCont 



Annual Hockey Game Results in M. A. 
C. Victory. 



The M. A. C. Dramatic Society 
gave its initial performance, "The Pri- 
vate Secretary," at the Amherst town 
hall on Thursday evening. The house 
was well filled and the efforts of the 
players were rewarded with enthusias- 
tic applause. 

THE CAST. 

Mrs. Stead. 

R. C. Robinson 11. South Boston 

Douglas Cattermole. 

A. H. Sharpe ' 1 1 , Saxonvtlle 

Mr. Sydney Gibson (tailor of Bond St.), 

G. W. Simmons ex-' 14. Boston 

Henry Marsland. 

J. E. Dudley. Jr.. Ml, Nawton Center 

Rev. Robert Spauldlng (the Private Secre- 
tary), S. M. Jordan M3. Rutherford, N.J. 

Mr. Cattermole (Douglas' s uncle). 
George Zabriskie 2nd. M3.Rutheriord. N.J. 

Knox (a writ server), 

F. W. Read M4, Boston 

Miss Ashford (the Marsland governess). 

F. B. Hills M2. Bernardston 

Mr. Marsland (Harry's uncle). 

W S. Moir M3. Boston 

Edith Marsland (daughter to Mr. Marsland), 
H. E. Goodnough 14. Wllbraham 
Eva Webster (her friend and companion). 

E. I. Wilde 12. Taunton 

John (a footman). 

G. P. Nickerson II. Amherst 

"The Private Secretary." is the 
story of an eccentric, delightful, quick- 
tempered, lovable, gruff-spoken, large- 
hearted old fellow who comes to Lon- 
don from India in search of his 
nephew. Douglas Cattermole. Hav- 
ing had his own fling at the world, and 
with his pockets bulging with money, 
he hopes to find the young Douglas 
something of a firebrand, the sort of a 
boy on whom he can spend his wealth 
with a lavish hand and who may be 
counted on to sow his wild oats with- 
out stint. As a matter of fact Douglas 
Is one that moves at a pretty fast pace. 
But there are, of course, a lot of en- 
tanglements before the uncle finds this 
out or even finds out who Douglas Is. 
For, at the very outset, he supposes 
his nephew to be a little, mincing, 
maiden aunt sort of a man, the Rev. 
Robert Spaulding. And he continues 
in the mistake till the end of the last 
act when the smoke blows off the plot 
and the true identity of his nephew, 
who at the time of the denouement is 
posing as the private secretary in the 
home of a Mr. Marsland and Inciden- 
tally making love to that gentleman's 
captivating daughter, is declared. 

George Zabriskie, 2nd, '13, as the 
gruff and gay old uncle, A. H. Sharpe 
Ml, as Douglas, and S. M. Jordan 



PROMENADE 



5] 



The last game of the season, the 
one with Amherst, was a fitting climax 
for such a successful season. If the 
spectators had any doubts regarding 
the relative strengths of the teams 
previous to the game, they were 
speedily banished as soon as the game 
commenced. Never have our for- 
wards played a faster game than they 
did Tuesday and the small score of I 
to was no indication of the merits of 
the teams. Amherst was outclassed 
in every department of the game, 
being forced to keep four men on the 
defensive the entire game. 

Although our team was constantly 
around the Amherst goal in the first 
half they were unable to get any accu- 
rate shots on account of the defensive 
tactics of the Amherst team which 
consisted of crowding their entire team 
around the goal. The first half which 
was confined entirely to Amherst ter- 
ritory ended without either side scor- 
ing. The first half, which was exceed- 
ingly rough, found Peckham penalized 
one minute for tripping, Babcock. the 
Amherst goal, was detected in a third 
attempt to trip and Abele also was sent 
off. 

The second half started off with 
Amherst still holding to her defensive 
tactics. Occasionally, Captain Wash- 
burn, by far the fastest man on his 
team would break away from the play 
with the puck either to be overtaken or 
to make a harmless pass as his team 
mates were all too slow to be of con- 
sistent help to him Near the middle 
of the half after Needham had brought 
the puck past Sibley, the Amherst 
cover-point, Hutchinson's quick shot 
reached the net and scored the winning 
goal for Massachusetts. Following this, 
Amherst attempted a little offensive 
play but excepting the shooting of 
Washburn it was entirely harmless. 
Chapln was sent off the ice for two min 
utesfor tripping. The whistle ended the 
game that marked our second success- 
ive hockey victory over Amherst and 
the close of the most successful sea- 
son any athletic team representing the 
college has ever had, winning seven 
out of nine games. Losing to M.I.T. 
and to Dartmouth we defeated Wil- 
liams. Springfield Training School, 
Louden Field Hockey Club. Renssa- 



( Continued oa pac* 2 1 



I Continued on pac* 3) 



Succassful Social Event Well Attended 
and Enjoyed. 

The annual Junior Promenade 
occurred last Friday night In the Drill 
Hall. Both of the upper classes were 
well represented, there being fifty 
couples present. The hail was very 
tastefully decorated and this combined 
with the exquisite gowns of the ladles 
lent a profusion of color charming to 
behold. The main decorative feature 
was a large electric sign which spelled 
out the word "Massachusetts' ' beneath 
which was hung a transparency dls 
playing a maroon 1912. The entire 
electric display was in the form of an 
arch which occupied the north end of 
the Drill Hall. Behind this were 
located the cosey corners which of 
course have an important part to play 
at all proms. At the south end of the 
hall was constructed a very realistic 
fire-place with an electric fire which all 
but radiated heat. The walls were 
hung solidly with cedar boughs, while 
the ceiling was ornamented profusely 
with strips of maroon bunting. The 
orchestra was seated on a raised plat- 
form to the right of the electric sign, 
whilf directly across the hall was 
located the patroness's corner. Light 
was furnished by the Illuminated Mas- 
sachusetts, by a large electrically out 
lined maroon M placed on the front of 
the balcony and by a cluster of maroon 
globes arranged in a large bunch of 
cedar boughs hung from the center oi 
the celling. 

The hour from eight until nine was 
given over to a concert furnished by 
the orchestra during which time the 
various couples arrived and were intro- 
duced to the patrons and patronesses. 
At nine o'clock the dancing was begun 
and continued well Into the "wee sma" 
hours. There was a short Intermis- 
sion of fifteen minutes between ten 
and eleven when a flashlight was taken 
of all present. A light supper was 
served by a caterer from twelve to 
one. The couples dispers;d at four 
o'clock, each one asserting that the 
affair had been a most enjopable one. 

The following is a list of th< 
present : 

1890. 
Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Hasklns of 
Amherst. 

1905. 
A. D. Taylor of Boston. 

(Continued on par* 2) 



INFORMAL IN DRILL HALL FEB. 25th AT 4 P. M. 



^^^ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 21, 191 1. 



"THE PRIVATE SECRETARY" 

[Continued from first pace. I 

'13, as the Reverend Spauldlng, kept 
the ball of merriment rolling gaily back 
and forth across the stage. There 
was also a little tailor in the person of 
G. W. Simmons ex-' 14, who devel- 
oped a lot of laughable comedy on his 
own hook. This little tailor wanted to 
find his way into the upper strata of 
society and he succeeded in securing 
an unstable position there for a short 
time but finally he came to the irate 
attention of the impetuous old uncle, 
who found nothing good in him and 
saw fit to banish him to his proper 
sphere. 

H. E. Goodnough '14 and E. I. 
Wilde '12, a trifle flat-footed, loose- 
jointed and hatchet-jawed in their im- 
personation of two pert and lively 
young girls, nevertheless acquitted 
themselves up to the respective bland- 
ishments of Douglas and his bosom 
friend, Harry Marsland, in the person 
of J. E. Dudley, Jr., 'II. 

Mrs. Stead as Douglas' landlady, 
In the person of R. C. Robinson 'II, 
who wanted to know the inside history 
of her lodger's affairs and of every- 
one's affairs, for that matter, didn't 
object at all to the merriment she 
caused the audience. 

W. S. Molr '13, as Mr. Marsland, 
F. B. Hills '12, as Miss Ashford, the 
Marsland governess, J. W. Read '14, 
a writ server, and G. P. Nickerson, 
the Marsland butler, sustained their 
parts with credit. 

The play was staged under the 
direction of Mr. McKay of M. A. C. ; 
James K. Mills '77 and Mrs. J. K. 
Mills. The music, which was excel- 
lent, was furnished by the college 
orchestra, P. A. Racicot leading. 
The head usher was 0. G. Anderson 
'13. He was assisted by H. F. Jones 
'13, W. V. Hayden '14, N. H. Deer- 
ing '14, R. S. Damon *I4 and S B. 
Freeborn '14. 



JUNIOR PROMENADE 

[Continued from page 1 .] 

1908. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carlton Bates of 
Washington, D. C. 

1909. 
J. Noyes and Miss Barker of Hart- 
ford, Conn. ; A. W. Hubbard and 
Miss Russell of Sheffield, Conn. 

1910. 

S. C. Brooks and Miss Mills of 
Greenwich, Conn. 

1911. 
H. W. Blaney and Miss Greene of 
Lowell; A. P. Bursley and Miss 
Brand of Fairhaven ; I. C. Gilgore 
and Miss Jones of Schenectady, N. 
Y. ; N. H. Hill and Miss Dodge of 
Concord, N. H.; H. H. Howe and 
Miss Munsey of Swampscott; R. D. 
Lull and Miss Pray of Natlck; R. W. 
Piper and Miss Mathews of Dover, N. 
H. ; R, C. Robinson and Miss Sayre 
of Newark, N. J.; L. 0. Stevenson 
and Miss Cobb of Amherst; E. E. I 



Warren and Miss Chickering of Wor- 
cester; H. F. Willardand Miss Hyatt 
of Leominster; E. L. Winn and Miss 
Spiers of New York city, N. Y. 

1912. 
R. T. Beers and Miss Robinson of 
Billerica; W. R. Bent and MlssGiblln 
of Marlboro, E. N. Boland and Miss 
Luther of South Boston; A. C. Brett 
and Miss Farnsworth of Leominster; 
L. S. Caldwell and Miss Cary of 
Lynn; Jesse Carpenter, Jr. and Miss 
Wells of Attleboro; W. G. Deming 
and Miss Deming of Wethersfield. 
Conn. ; L. E. Fagerstrom and Miss 
Gorman of Worcester; L. W. Gaskill 
and Miss Kellogg of North Amherst; 
F. L. Gray and Miss McCarthy of 
East Boston; J. A. Harlow and Miss 
Rlndge of Grand Rapids, Mich. ; J. 
M. Heald and Miss Robinson of 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. ; T. Hemenway 
and Miss Blank of Winchester; F. B. 
Hills and Miss Cooley of Boston; C. 
A. Lodge and Miss Keating of Salem • 
J. F. Martin and Miss Gurry of Fox- 
boro; T. J. Moreau and Miss Murphy 
of Turners Falls; G. B. O'Flynn and 
Miss Cook of Worcester; C. Peckham : 
and Miss Dillingham of New Bedford; 
J. E. Pierpont and Miss Pierpont of 
Williamsburg; M. C. Pratt and Miss 
Pratt of Holderness, N. H.; A.N. 
Raymond and Miss Bartlett of Spring- 
field , E. J. Robinson and Miss Hood 
of Danvers; B. G. Southwick and 
Miss Wallburg of Watertown, N. Y; 
D. G. Tower and Miss Phippen of 
Salem; H. C. Walker and Miss 
Howard of North Amherst; E. I. 
Wilde and Miss Lane of Dighton; S. 
Williams and Miss Quackenbush of 
Waldwick, N. J.; H. H. Wood and 
Miss Avery of Salem. 

1913. 

J. W. Covill and Miss Whitman of 
East Orange, N. J. ; C. A. Shute and 
Miss Lamond of Auburndale; C. D. 
Walker and Miss Burgess of Spring- 
field. 

The following patronesses were 
present : Mrs. K. L. Butterfield, Mrs. 
C. E. Gordon, Mrs. A. A. Mackimmle, 
Mrs. G. C. Martin, Mrs. A. V. 
Osmun, Mrs. C. R. Duncan, Mrs. 
Jesse Carpenter. 

ORDER OF DANCES. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 21, 1911. 



UP- TO- DATE 



w 



PUMPS 

ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 

TENNIS SHOES 

EXPERT REPAIRING 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Co, 



616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 



Waltz, 
Two-step, 
Waltz. 
Schottische. 

Waltz. 

Two-step, 

Waltz. 

Two-step, 

Waltz. 

Music by 



Jewelers and Silversmiths, 



•Vision of Salome" 

•• Billy Ballou ,' 

"Wild Rose" 

Gee. I'd Like to Furnish a Flat 

for You " 

" Sweet Remembrance" 

•' Chicken Reel " 

■' You and I and the Rose " 

College Songs (Selected) 

"Till We Meet Again" 

Hardy's orchestra of 



Diamond Merchants. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



THURBER'S 

COLLEGE LUNCH 



AMHBRMT, MAMM. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



CAMERAS 



AND 



Waltz. 

Two-step, 

Waltz, 

Two-step, 

Schottische, 

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Duchess, 

Waltz. 

Two-step. 

Waltz. 



Waltz, 

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Schottische, 



PART I. 

"To Thee" 

" Bring Me a Rose " 

"Just For A Girl" 

"Knockout Drops " 

" Under The Yum Yum Tree " 

" Arcadians " 

"After The Round Up" 

" Venus on Earth " 

" College Yell " 

" Dollar Princess " 

" Charming Weather " 

•' All That I Ask is Love " 

"Miss Liberty " 

" Return of Spring " 

INTERMISSION. 

^AJ*T n. 

" Oh, You Dream " 

"Sons of Old Massachusetts" 

" Day Dreams " 

"That Dublin Raf " 

" Every Little Movement " 



Photographic Supplies 

[At Deuel's Drug Store 



ALBANY, 
N. Y. 




Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 



SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises, Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.'. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Makers 
•f 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



Worcester. 

The following men composed the 
prom committee : Alden C. Brett, 
chairman, Prof. C. E. Gordon. Prof. 
A. A. Macklmmie, Silas Williams, 
Rowland T. Beers, William R. Bent, 
Jesse Carpenter, Jr., Joseph A. Har- 
low, Jay M. Heald, Frank B. Hills, 
John E. Pierpont, Herman C. Walker. 

CALENDAR 

[Notlc«« for this column should be dropped In the 
Siohal Office or handed to E. M. Brown 1 1 . on or 
before the Saturdiy precedtnf each Issue. J 

Feb. 21—6-45 p. m., Stockbrldge ciub 
in Agricultural Recitation room. 
7-00 p. m., Glee Club rehearsal 
in Chapel. 

7-15 p.m., Junior Landscape 
club In Wilder Hall. 
Feb. 22— Holiday, Washington's 

Birthday Anniversary. 
Feb. 23— 6-45 p. m., Y. M. C. A. 

Meeting in Chapel. 
Feb. 24—6-00 p. m., College Night, 

Draper Hall. 
Feb. 25—4-00 p. m., Informal In Drill 
Hall 

6-30 p. m.. Social Union enter- 
tainment in Chapel, dramatic 
reading of Shakespeare's Mac- 
beth, Prof. F. B. McKay. 
Feb. 26—5-00 p. m., Vesper Services 
Rev. Jason N. Pierce, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 




New Stock of Pocket 

Books and Pass 

Cases 



CAP A GOWNS 



To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



The Prospect House 



Good Board and 
Clean, Airy Rooms 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 



The Worthy. 

FRANK WEBBER. Mr.R. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

Amherst Corner In Rathskellar. 

YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 



HOCKEY 

[Continued from flr»t p«g«] 



laer Polytechnic Institute, Trinity, 
Yale and Amherst. This is a record 
that we may well be proud of and from 
the fact that fonr of the seven regular 
men are freshmen and with only one 
graduating, we have the promise of a 
strong team for some years to come. 
The line-up. 



m. a. c. 

Jones, r 
Hutchinson, c 
Peckham, rw 
Wooley, lw 
Needham, cp 
Adams, p 
Ackerman, g 

Goal— Hutchinson, 
ham, Babcock, Abele, 
Dalton of N. Y. A C. 



Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

l^jy «thc country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
k Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



C&rp*ivtcr & Morehous* 
PRINT6J 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Established 




1851 



AMHERST. 

r. Washburn 

c. Cranshaw 

rw, Chapin 

rw, Wilcox 

cp, Sibley 

p, Abele 

g, Babcock 

Penalized — Peck- 
Chapin. Referee — 
Umpire— Metsdoff 



Eimer & Amend 



205-211 Third Ave., Cor. 18th St. 



New York 



Headquarters For 



DRUG STORE 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 




TOBACCO 



of Springfield Training School. Timers- 
Carpenter of Harvard and Hayden of Mass 
achusetts. Time — 20-minute halves. 



AT 



The College Drug Store 



RESOLUTIONS 

Whereas, it hath pleased God in His infin- 
ite wisdom to take unto Himself the father 
of our beloved brother, Nathaniel D. 
Walker ; be it 

Resolved, that we, the members of the 
Theta Phi fraternity, do hereby extend to 
our brother our sincerest sympathy in this, 
his hour of affliction; and be it further 

Resolved : that a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to our bereaved brother, and that 
a copy be fiied in the records of the frater- 
nity and a copy be published in the Signal. 
■MM Morton Brown. ) Ror ^ 

W.IL.AM C SANCTUARY, j (^^ 

W. Stuart Moir. ) * 



Chemicals, Chemical, Physical, Bacteriological 

Apparatus and Assay Goods 

* j- 

We carry the largest stock of Laboratory Supplies in the U. S. 

PROMPT SERVICE 



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The College Signal, Tuesday, February ti, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 21, 191 1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911. EdItor-ln-Chlef. 

HAROLD F. WILL ARD. I 911. Managing Editor. 
IRVING W. DAVIS. 1911. Alumni Notes. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY. 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYALN.HALLOWELL.I9I2, Assistant Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912 College Notes. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Department Notes. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALl EN 1911. Business Manager. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1 9 1 2 . Asst. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN. Circulation. 

Subscription $150 per year. Single 
copies. S cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, FEB. 21. No. 18 



It is a certain thing that dramatics 
have won a place at M. A. C. The 
dramatic club has proved Itself to be 
of merit and the talent is exceptionally 
good. The Signal wishes to convey 
Its comoHments to President Dudley 
and Manager Zabriskie for their part 
In this work ; it is surely well merited. 



The hockey season is over and we 
should feel proud that our team has 
brought M. A. C. out so prominently 
in this, the foremost of winter sports. 
With poor ice much of the time, the 
team practiced with difficulty, yet 
played exceeding well and suffered 
defeat in only two games. The Signal 
wishes to compliment Captain Adams, 
Manager Nickerson and the team for 
their part in this work. It has been 
very commendable. 



It Is with great pleasure that we note 
the installation of the mail boxes in the 
room formerly occupied by Dr. Rey- 
nolds in the east entry, North College. 
Mr. Kenny and President Blaney of 
the Senate should be highly compli- 
mented for having this work of instal- 
lation carried out so quickly. There 
are 232 boxes in all and these should 
serve the majority of the men. A 
stamp window has also been provided 
and it is with great pleasure that stu- 
dents accept this. 



POST OFFICE. 

Work is now near completion on the 
installation of the post-office boxes In 
North College. It is with great pleas- 
ure the student body accepts this. It 
has been a very prominent need of the 
college for several years. The system 
in vogue at present is anything but 
adequate, as the mail is left in the box 
in West Entry, North College and 
oftentimes important pieces of mail 
have been lost. Through the post- 
office each man will get his own mail 
and his only. There are only 232 
boxes, but from the way the student 
body volunteered to rent boxes, there 
will be a sufficient number for the 
present. The stamp window is 



another feature which will be greatly 
appreciated by the students. Hereto- 
fore It has been necessary to buy their 
stamps at the college store, which is 
not always open, or borrow of their 
neighbors. This post-office scheme Is 
something which will cause more 
appreciation on the part of the student 
body in the future than at present, 
though It is appreciated greatly now. 
The mall boxes are to be rented for 
fifty cents for the remainder of the 
year. It has been estimated that the 
running expenses will amount to three 
dollars a week and it is planned to 
have the rental of the boxes cover this 
amount. The college has assumed 
the expense of having the boxes 
installed. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Prof. J. C. Graham, who will have 
charge of the new poultry department 
has arrived from Wisconsin. 

The gymnasium classes were discon- 
tinued the latter part of the week to 
allow the decoration of the drill hall 
for the Junion Prom. 

Professor Haskell spoke at the 
Farmers' Institute held at Chester- 
field, Saturday. In the morning he 
spoke on "Potatoes," in the afternoon 
his subject was "Agriculture in 
Germany." 

Professor Gordon attended Saturday 
a reunion and dinner given in New 
York in honor of Prof. Henry Fairfield 
Osborn, De Costa professor of zoology 
at Columbia univ-rsity and president 
of the American Museum of Natural 
History. 

The following members of the glee 
club have been picked by Professor 
Howard as a college choir: First 
tenors, W. H. Hasey and L. N. 
Pease; second tenors, J. D. French 
and F. B. Hills; first basses, F. D. 
Griggs and J.B.Cobb; second basses, 
H. C. Walker and D. W. Gibson. 

At a meeting of the Guernsey sec- 
tion of the Connecticut Valley Breed- 
ers' association, held in the Northamp- 
ton board of trade rooms last Wednes- 
day, the principal address was given 
by E. H. Forristall of this college. 
He took as his subject, "Guernseys 
as I have seen them in other places." 

The Sophomore class met Thursday 
and elected new officers for the semes- 
ter as follows; President, Dudley 
French of Hyde Park ; vice-president, 
Burton Harris of Wethersfield, Conn. ; 
secretary, Harold P. Bursley of Pea- 
body ; treasurer, Herbert T. Hatch of 
Norwall; class captain, Glover E. 
Howe of Marlboro; sergeant-at-arms, 
James L. O'Brien of Wayland; his- 
torian, Reyer H. Van Zwaluenburg of 
Rutherford, N. Y. 

At the Senior class meeting held 
last week the following officers were 
elected: President, Clarence A. Smith 
of Northampton; vice-president, 
Edward A. Larrabee of Winthrop ; 
secretary, Leonard M. Johnson of 
Easthampton; treasurer, Herman A. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



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Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E. M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



Clapp, '12. 



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We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun 
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Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OP NO. COLLEGR 



Pellett, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



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Orders left at the Amherat House will rec«i»' 
prompt attention 



Pauly of Somerville; class captain, 
Henry B. Morse of Salem ; sergeant- 
at-Arms, Ralph G. Smith of Lynn. 
The commencement committee will 
be appointed by the President at an 
early date. 

CONTESTANTS FOR SECOND 
ANNUAL DEBATE 

As a result of the preliminaries In 
debate held last week, the following 
men were chosen to enter the second 
annual contest : Debating club, I. C. 
Gilgore 1911 and J. M. Heald 1912; 
freshman-sophomore, T. J. Godvin 
1913 and J, D. French 1913; junior- 
senior. J. Hemenway 1912 and T. J. 
Moreau 1912; B. Ostrolenk 1911 and 
L. W. Burby 1913 were chosen alter- 
nates. These six men have been 
divided Into two teams and, on the 
occasion of the Second Annual Debate 
to be held at Assembly on March 8th 
next, will discuss the question, "Re- 
solved, that the Republican party Is 
entitled to popular support." Gilgore, 
Moreau and Hemenway will support 
the affirmative and French, Godvin 
and Heald the negative. The judges 
in this contest will select three men 
who will each be awarded a gold 
medal and ten dollars and will make 
up the team that will meet Bates col- 
lege at Lewlston. Me., next May. 
The issues for the debate were 
assigned last week. All the men have 
had considerable experience In public 
speaking and will "do their darnedst" 
to "make the team" on March 8th. 
This occasion will undoubtedly prove 
the best Public Speaking Contest yet 
held. 

HOCKEY RESUME 

(Continued from first pat*. I 



a decided victory for Massachusetts, 
our team winning by a score of thirteen 
to one. 

The next evening our team met the 
crack Louden Field Hockey Club at 
the same rink where our team won In 
an overtime period game by the close 
score of five to four. This was the 
greatest victory thus far. as the team 
was composed of ex-collegiate stars 
and have defeated many prominent 
college teams. 

The next game, which was the sec- 
ond home game, was the first defeat. 
This was administered at the hands of 
M. I. T. It required an extra period 
to deslde the game which ended In the 
score of four to three. Stucklen, a 
last year's Dartmouth forward was a 
star ; skating and shooting being fea- 
tures. Jones played a fine game as 
did all the forwards although the de- 
fensive was not up to its usual form. 

The crowning feature of the whole 
season was the defeat of Yale by the 
score of four to one. Jones tallied 
the greatest number of goals caging 
the puck twice, while Hutchinson and 
Peckham each shot one. The de- 
fensive erd of our team was as near 
perfect as could be wished for. Acker- 
man repeatedly making phenomenal 
stops which saved the day. Captain 
Adams played strong game at point, 
the whole team worked like a machine. 
A Boston paper says : — 

"Those Amherst farmers' sprung 



quite a surprise on the general public 
as well as on the Ell hockey players 
They will be rated as some pumpkins" 
somewhere else than In their beautiful 
hill town. Sports benefit by these 
surprises, but It is rather hard on the 
fellow that acts as the goat." 

Dartmouth proved too much for our 
team which was not up to its usual 
tone. We were defeated by the score 
of four to nothing. Our forwards were 
unable to get started. This game was 
one of the features of the winter car- 
nival consisting of snow shoe and ski 
racing as well as the annual dramatics. 
Our team was royally treated and are 
all loud in their praise of the Dari- 
mouth hospitality. 

The climax of the season was the 
defeat of Amherst, Feb. 14th. at Pratt 
riuk. The Amherst team was kept 
wholly on the defensive, employing 
four men in that department through 
out the entire game. Hutchinson 
scored the deciding goal in the second 
half. Our forwards were credited with 
being the fastest forwards who have 
ever played on the Pratt rink. The 
game was fast and rough and enjoyed 
by a large body of spectators, the 
large body of whom were from 
Massachusetts. 

This game concluded the season 
which can not but reflect credit on the 
college. The percentage of freshmen, 
four out of the seven regulars — is very 
promising, insuring a fast team next 
year. Captain Adams, who made the 
first team ever representing the col- 
lege, is the only man to graduate. 
Considering that the sport has been 
established but three years It seems 
unbelievable that such success could 
be possible. With the material from 
next year's team we have promise of 
developing one of the best teams In 
New England for the season of 1911- 
1912. 

J. F.Adams who led this years' suc- 
cessful hockey team to victory in the 
position of captain comes from Melrose 
where he played two years on his high 
school team. He played in the entire 
nine games of the season at point and 
it was his plucky defensive work that 
saved the team from many goals. He 
graduates this year and his departure 
will be a great loss to the team. He 
is five feet six inches tall, weighs one 
hundred and fity pounds and is twenty- 
one years old. 

C. Peckham. this year's right 
wing, began playing hockey the first 
year of its institution at M. A. C. He 
is a speedy player and generally man- 
aged to "squeeze" In a goal or so. 
He is five feet seven, weighs one 
hundred and forty-five and is twenty 
years old. 

A. J. Ackerman began hockey here 
the first year of its institution, at goal. 
He is a steady player and has time 
after time saved his team from defeat 
by phenomenal playing. He is five 
feet ten inches tall, weighs one hund- 
red and forty-five pounds and Is twenty- 
one years old. He halls from Wor- 



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growth, think of this when considering home mixing. 

It is much the same with modern fertilizers as it is with moden 
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physicians in dealing with many conditions. In critical cases physicians 
do not put their trusts in prescriptions made up in small lots ot uncertain 
chemicals by local druggists. Can the farmer afford to mil deed lot his 
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We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
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Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February si, 191 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 21, 191 1. 



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All styles, up-to-date and prices reasonable. 



The place to have your group and single pictures taken correctly. Call 
and make your appointments. Visitors welcome. 



STEAM KITTING, Telephone 59-4- 

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Church Windows, 
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Lead Lights, &c. 
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cester but never played hockey previous 
to his advent to M. A. C. 

D. W. Jones comes from Melrose 
where he capta'ned the high school 
team the year that they were cham- 
pions of the state. He is fine all 
' round player, a fast skater and an 
' accurate shooter. He is a freshman, 
five feet eleven Inches tall, weighs one 
hundred and sixty and is twenty years 
old. 

J. G. Hutchinson is an old Arling- 
ton High star, playing four years on 
that team when they were interscho- 
lastic champions. He is a fast man 
and a good working mate for Jones. 
They form a pair of forwards such as 
are hard to find in any college team. 
He is five feet eleven and three-quar 
ters inches and weighs one hundred 
and fifty. He is nineteen years old 
and a freshman. 

Needham, another freshman, playea 
a speedy game at cover-point the 
entire season He is a sure man on 
the defensive and quick and accurate 
in his offensive playing. He was 
captain of Springfield High team for 
two years. He is five feet eight inches 
high, weighs one hundred and fifty-five 
and is twenty years old. 

Wooley, the fourth freshrrnn, is the 
smallest yet one of the fastest and 
pluckiest men on the team. He is a 
past-master at body blocking. He 
was the captain of the Maiden High 
last year. He is five feet five inches 
tall, weighs one hundred and twenty- 
five pounds and is nineteen years old. 
He played in all but the first game. 

Sanctuary, who made his letter last 
year, played in four games this year. 
He is a thorough and heady player. 
He is five feet seven and weighs one 
hundred and fifty. He is twenty-two 
and a member of the Junior class. 

Moir from Roxbury Latin, Walker 
from Marlboro High, and Ellis were 
steady and faithful in their practice 
and it is due to their hard work that 
the varsity was able to play the game 
that they did. 

The average age of the regular seven 
men is twenty years, the average 
weight one hundred and forty-seven 
pounds and the height five feet seven 
inches. 

This makes the team exceedingly 
light which adds all the more credit 
to the best hockey team ever repre- 
senting the college. 



Olvmpia Candv Co. 



257 Main St., 
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Mass. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
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Football and Basketball suits 
the standard at all leading 
colleges. The Wright 6f 

Ditson Shoes and Head 
Guards the best and mostpract 
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Goods. The Wright & Dit- 
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COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE 
AT M. A. C. 

The legislative committee on agri- , 
culture made its annuai visit to M. A. 
i C. last week Thursday and Friday. It 
is a necessary custom for the trustees 
of the college to present each year to 
to the Legislature a budget setting 
forth the needs of M. A. C. Each | 
year the Committee on Agriculture 
from the House and makes the Senate 
make a visit here, where each of the 
items of the bill is gone over and the 
needs pointed out. The committee was 
met at the station by President Butter- 
field and the trustees of the college and 



A 

<ZL .- College Students and Athletes 
**t!*- who want the real, superior 
^-^ articles for the different sports 
"•'"""' should get the kind that hear 
our trade-mark. Catalogue free. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass 

22 Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal 

76 Weybosset Street, Providence, R. I 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. W. Blaney, "o. 
C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, E. L. Winn, S; 
Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursday, 
Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
1 arnations, violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
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LUNCHES 



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PRICE ON APPLICATION 



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8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. • 
NORTHAMPTON, - - MASS. 
Telephone 



were driven to the dairy rooms, for the 
first inspection. 

For the past two or three years, 
since the burning of the barn in 1908, 
the department of dairying has been | 
seriously hanaicapped by lack of room. ( 
After the fire temporary quarters were j 
fitted up in the basement of South 
College. These rooms have been in ' 
use ever since. Being too small, 
the result has been that a large num- 
ber of students wishing to take the 
course have been unable to do so. 
On this account the trustees have 
asked the Legislature for a special ap- 
propriation for a dairying building, one 
of the greatest needs of the coilege 
to-day. The visit to the department 
could not but have impressed the com- 
mittee of the inefficiency of the quar- 
ters. 

Then the committee went to Draper 
Hall wnere supper was served. Then 
followed a hearing on the proposed ad- j 
dition to Draper Hail. The trustees] 
were not long in pointing out the j 
crowded conditions, and outlined the j 
plan for an addition on the northeast: 
corner, to the committee. At 8-00 
o'clock, the members were the guests 
of Dramatic society at its produc- 
tion of "The Private Secretary'' at 
the town hall. The legislatures en- 
joyed the play and were warm in their 
praise of it. One of the men went so 
far as to say. "some of those who 
took part are missing their vocation 
by studying agriculture, for they should 
be on the stage." 

A tour of inspection was made 
Friday, Entomological building, Clark 
Hall, Wilder Hall, West Experiment 
Station, Chemical Laboradory, Social 
Union and Game-room, power-plant, 
barns, Animal Husbandry building, 
Extension work offices, Agricultural 
rooms, administration offices, Library, 
Drill Hall, and the Veterinary building 
being visited. At each place matters 
concerning the budget were gone over 
and carefully explained. 

About 11-25 o'clock, the visitors 
were escorted to the chapel where the 
regular exercises of the d*y were 
held. The President introduced the 
joint committee to the students. He 
said that the student body was, after 
all. the best argument the college ha- 1 . 
As the time was limited, he called on 
only two or three of the men. Sena 
tor Hoar of Concord, chairman of the 
committee on agriculture from the 
Senate, spoke of the position M. A. C. 
is holding in Massachusetts and in the 
country at large. He was warm in 
his praise of President Butterfleld and 
the trustees for the royal way in which 
the visitors had been entertained. 

Representative Avery of the House 
committee, former Representative 
Hosmer of Amherst, now a member 
of the trustees, and Charles Ward of 
Buckland, were also called upon. All 
of the speakers and also the trustees, 
the committees, and "Prexy" were 
given cheers by the students led by 
our regular leader, Nickerson '11. 
Then the students marched out singing 
"Old Massachusetts." 

Luncheon was served at Draper 
Hall, and then the last item, extension 
work was taken up. This department 
has become an important part in the 
college work for the state. No phase 
of the college work offers more help 
to the Commonwealth and the farmers 
in the state. Lectures are given, 
demonstrations, orchards and gardens 
established besides giving instructions 
along other lines. It is because of 
these facts that the large, appropria- 
tions are asked for. 



i i . ii . i i i ■ ■ ■ ■ ■■■' ■■ ■■ •■ ■ — 

I • . . _^ . . . . — Mai — ■ i. 



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There's something unique 
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I he Massachusetts State Hoard of Agriculture Ottered a Prixe for the Molt Profitable Acre of 
Massachusett» Orchards. This Contest Has Recently ( loied, and the 

PRIZE IS WON BY THK DREW-MUNSON FRUIT CO.. of Littleton. Maw. 

Their Prize Winning Acrr of Baldwin Apples 

UAVE THEM A TOTAL RETURN OF S7I5.70-THB NET PROFIT WA« SSIv.M 



JSfi&KBft^JVSBWE Trails PHOSPHATE P0WDEI; vl 



THE KATE OF 
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The Fallowing I-etter From Barnes Brothers, the Famous Fruit Growers and Orchardists of 

V.ilesville. fonn.. Shows That Thomas Phosphate Powder Brings a Prize to 

Every I ser in the Form of a Profitable Crop : 



TftlCOS MoRTIMKR COMCANV, 

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THERE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS POR YOU I 

I he whole story is told in Thk New En<;lani> IIomkstrao for January 
7th, 1911, and in the New Edition of our Booklet, 'Up I l>ate Frujt Grow- 
ing," which is sent free if you mention Thk College Signal. 

The Coe- Mortimer Co. im s f p okters 24-26 Stone St., N. Y. City 

We also distribute from Boston, Mass.; Belfast, Main*: Baltimore, 
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The College Signal, Tuesday, February 21, 1911, 



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THE 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers a thorough training in agricultural 
vocations that are not yet overcrowded, 
and in which there are constantly increas- 
ing opportunities for employment. 

NECESSARY EXPENSES MODERATE 

LOCATION OF COLLEGE IDEAL 

ATTENDANCE RAPIDLY INCREASING 

For complete catalog or specific informati- 
on, write to 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 
SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

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Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society, 

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H. W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

C P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill, President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

J. E. Dudley. Jr., President 

R. C. Barrows. President 

I. C. Gllgore, President 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol.. XXi^ 



,SACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February lift, 1911 



No. 19 



SPECIAL HORTICULTURAL ISSUE 



RELAY TEAM 

First Defeat of the Relay Team by 
Pastime Athletic Club. Caldwell, 
Tower and Huntington Se- 
cure Places in Events. 

Tuesday, Feb. 21. the track team 
went to the indoor meet of the Sec- 
ond Division, Naval Militia at the 
state armorv at Hartford. Conn. 
While the relay team was defeated in 
their match with the speedy Pastime 




SOCIAL UNION 

Prof. F. B. McKay Entertained by Dra- 
matic Readings from 
Macbeth. 

The attendance was somewhat small 
due to the Informal. The recital was 
not only unique in its character but 
supprisingly interesting. 

The general plans of the lecture was 
to follow the fortunes of the principal 
characters, -Macbeth. Lady Macbeth, 
Duncan, Malcomb. Banquo, Mac- 
duff, the Witch. The scenes acted 
were those of the most importance In 
the development of the play, tamely: 
The meeting of Macbeth and Banquo 
vith the Witches on the heath, the 
Dagger and the Banquet scenes fol- 
lowed by trve second meeting with the 
witches. Foliow. ng these was the 
castle scene in which Macbeth is in- 
formed of the approach of Bunam 
Woods to Dunsinane, the final deteat 
of Macbeth in battle bv Macduff ana 
the latter s hailing of Malcomb as king 
Scotland. 

The dtamatic selections were well 
delivered witn remarkable force and 
anion, and 'hese sel-n'ons were in- 
cited by short discussions of the in- 
terviewing facts of the play. This 
unity added greatly to the general ap- 
preciation. 



POULTRY SCHEDULE 

Program of Lecttrea and Deroonstra- 

tiona for Studcnta in Poultry 

School Course. 



INFORMAL 



Third Informal of Year a Oreat Suc- 
I s. Pi 0111. Decoration* 
UaaJ 



G. P. Nickerson 

A. C. the men entered in the otlw 
events gave a good account cf tncn- 
selves, capturing one first and three' 
thirds. The first appearance of the M 
men was in the intercollegiate mile. \ 
Captain Barrows, Caldwell and Tower j 
running for the college against some ; 
of the fastest intercollegiate milers 
from Btown, Amherst and other col- 
leges. Tne M men were content to 1 
trail the field for the first six laps, then 
Caldwell and Tower started out to 
better their positions At the end of 
the eighth lap Caldwell was running 
just outside of Taber of Brown, while 
Tower had dropped in behina Cobb of 
Amherst. At the beginning of the last 
lap Taber, who had led the entire dis- 
tance, started out to leave the field. 
Caldweli proved the better man and 

rConttimedo* oa«» 2.1 



VESPERS. 

Rev. Jason N. Pierce led the Sun- 
day service. Until very recently Mr. 
Pierce has been connected with one of 
the leading churches of Brooklyn. 

N. Y. 

The working theme, "consider thy- 
self lest thou also be judged, " was 
taken from GalationsVl verse 1. Mr. 
Pierce dwelt upon the fact that all men 
are men of sin. None are perfect, 
for the finer the man the higher his 
standards become. The college man's 
idea, that whatever their sin they 
have company, is universal. This 
idea of college men is approached 
by the optomistic idea. This idea 
that sin is on the decline and that the 
world is better than ever before is 
bound to cause trouble. The best 
way to avoid sin is to hate it. The 
surest way to hate it is to understand 
its beginning and ending. By realiz- 
ing the nature of sin, that sin is slavary, 
the love of father, and of God in 
heaven, we wouid then hate sin. 

Mr. Pierce throughout his sermon, 
had a personal magnetism that brought 
his words close to the fellows present. 



The short course in poudty will be 
given from the 27th of this montn to 
March 4th. The program of lectures 
has been arranged as follows: 

Monday, Feb. 27, 2 p. *.. iMtd 
floor of the "Chem. Lab." -The 
American Hen, Her Use and Abuse," 
by Prof J. C Graham. 3-00. "Feed- 
ing of Poultry," E. F. Gaskell. 

Tuesday, Feb. 28th, 8-15 a. m.. ¥ 
the chapel, "Poultry-hum. • r instruc- 
tion," by Professor Graham; 91 5. 
third floor of the "Chem. Lab.." 
"Feeding of Poultry," Mr. GasKell : 
10-15, Vetinary Duilding, "Dlsease^ 
of Poultry," Dr. J. B. Paige; I I 15. 
third floor 'Chem. Lab.'' 'Feeas, 
their comparison, etc." Prof. J. B. 
McLean; section I, 1 -30 p. at., msets 
on third floor "Chem. Lab." "Practi- 
cal Poultry-house Construction," C. 
Jewett. section 2, "lucubators and 
Brooders," Professor Granam ; 7 30. 
entomology building. -Beekeeping as 
an adjunct of the pjultry Busme 
Dr. B. N. Gates. 

Wednesday, March 1st. 8-15 a. M.,j 
chapel . ' • Poultry-house C instruct ion . " 
Professor Graham; 9-15, "Chem., 
Lab., "Poultry Literature," Mr. 
Gaskell: 10-15. "Chem. lab.." 
"Soils and Drainage for the Poultry 
Yard," Prof. W. D. Hurd ; 11-15. 
Wilder Hall. -Small Fruits as aajunct 
of the Poultry Business," Prof. F. C. 
Sears; Section I, 1-30 P. n., "Incu- 
bators and Brooders," Professor 
Graham ; Section 2, p-30 p. m., 
"Practical Poultry- house Construc- 
tion." Mr. Jewett. 

Thursday, March 2nd, 8-15 a. m., 
"Breealng and Mating," J. H. Robin- 
son of Boston; 9 1-15 12-00, animal 
husbandry building, "Demonstration 
of killing and dressing poultry." Dr. 
P. T. Woods of Danvers; 1-30, p. m., 
third floor "Chem. Lab." -'Breeding 
and Management of Poultry, with con 
ference on poultry matters." Prof. J. 
E. Rice of Cornell University ; 7-30. 
chapel, illustrated evening lecture by 
Professor Rice. 

Friday, March 3rd. 8-15 p. a., 
"Chem. Lab.," -Breeding and Man- 
agement," Prof. Jr E. Rice; 9 15. 
"Selection for Winter Egg Produc- 
tion," "Professor Graham; 10 15, 



In- third and mosi successful 
informal t the year was held Saturday 
in the Drill Hall. As is usual ai the 
first Informal alter (hi Prom, the 
attendance was lar^e. there being sixty 
one couj)'- i*he meat important 




(Continued an Nf« 2.1 



J. F. Adam: 

factor In the success of the affair wa- 
ttle decorations which were prSCttCJ 
those used for the Prom. Tht 
patronesses were Mrs. Waugh, Mr 
Stone, Miss Beal oi Mt. Hoiyoke co« 
lege and Mrs. Orcutt of Smith college. 
Music was furnished by Derrick 
orchestra of Westfieid. During totei 
mission luncheon was served in Draper 
Hall. Those who attended were: I 
S. Walker '05, G. A. Chapman '07 
< S. S. Crossman '09, L. S. McLain* 
'10. F. L. Thomas "10; 191 1, H. H. 
Howe, F. A. Prouty, H. A. Pauly. H. 

(Conilfta** oil pace 21 



"MOGUL SMOKER,'' DRILL HALL, SATURDAY, MAR. 4 

^ AT T O'CLOCK, P. ~ 






M. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 28, 191 1. 



RELAY TEAM 

[Continued from first page) 



produced one of his sprints which rap- 
idly widened the gap between him and 
the rest of the bunch. At the last 
bend Cobb slipped on the smooth floor 
and fell. Tower jumped him and dur- 
ing the last few yards closed in the 
gap between him and Taber to a great 
extent but failed to land second place 
by a small margin. The time 5 min. 
3 sec. was good considering the foor 
was unequipped with banks and no 
spikes were allowed. 

Whitney '13, was our only contest- 
ant in the quarter mile. He slipped 
on the smooth floor at the start, and 
was unable to make up the distance 
thus lost. 

Meanwhile Huntington had been 
putting in some good work in the 
jumps, winning third in the high jump 
and finishing third in the pole vault. 
The winning height ir. the high jump 
was 5 ft. 6 in. ; first place going to 
Hickson of Amherst, while Maxon, 
unattached, won the pole vault with a 
height of 10 feet. 

The last event of the evening was 
the relay between the Pastime A. C. 
and Massachusetts. The Pastime 
men proved to be as speedy a team 
as the college has ever met. Neil- 
sen jumped his man at the start and 
took the pole with a good lead. Gog- 
gin, his opponent came back strong at 
the end of the relay and succeeded in 
passing over a ten-yard lead to Dor- 
land who ran against Captain Barrows. 
Our man showed the effects of the 
hard mile in which he had run. and 
was unable to hold the speedy man 
against him. Clapp took up the task 
and was forced after a plucky effort to 
conceed more valuable yards to Parke 
who passed over a lead of nearly forty 
yards to Buist, Caldwell taking up the 
final pursuit. Then followed one of 
the pluckiest races of the evening as 
Caldwell cut down the Pastime man's 
lead yard by yard. The crowd appre- 
ciated the effort and the "Aggies" 
were given a cheer as Caldwell crossed 
the line not ten yards behind the win- 
ner. That, with spikes on a track 
such as our men have been accustomed 
to run on, the result would have been 
different, seemed the opinion of all. 
The time, 3 minutes and 47 seconds 
was the best relay time made during 
the evening. 

The summaries : 

Relay race — Pastime Athletic Club 
of New York vs. Massachusetts State 
College won by Pastime A. C. (Gog- 
gin, Dolan, Parke, Buist). Time, 
3 min. 47 sec. 

Pole vault — Won by P. V. Maxon, j 
unattached, 10 ft.; second, Wassels, ] 
unattached, 9 ft. 8 in. 5 third, Hun- 
tington, Massachusetts, 9 ft. 4 in. 

One mile — Won by Caldwell, Mass- 
achusetts ; second, Taber of Brown; 
third, Tower of Massachusetts; time, 
5 min. 3 sec. 

Running high jump — Won by Hick- 
son of Amherst; second, Rosenburg 



of Brown j third, Huntington of Mass- 
achusetts; height, 5 ft. 6 in. 

Nielson who was entered for the 
75-yard dash was delayed in the dress- 
ing room until too late to compete. 
The standing of the colleges competing 
is as follows : 

Wesleyan University, 18 

Brown, 14 

Massachusetts, 1 1 

Amherst, 9 

Colgate, 5 

Pennsylvania, 5 

Harvard, 3 



SHORT COURSE POULTRY 
SCHEDULE 

[Continued from first paga.l 

"The Business Side of Poultry Keep- 
ing," Mr. Robinson; 11-15, French 
Hall, "Vegetable Gardening as an 
adjunct of the Poultry Business ; C. S. 
Heller; Section 1, 1-30 p. m, "Chem. 
Lab.," "Practical Poultry-house Con- 
struction," Mr. Jewett ; Section 2, 
1-30 p. m., "Incubators and Broodrs," 
Professor Graham. 

Saturday, March 4, 8-00 A. M., 
visit to a poultry plant; 2 p. m., 
demonstration, H. P. Hinckley of 
Springfie d. 



INFORMAL 

(Continued from first pace- 1 



J. Baker, R. W. Whitney, E. A. 
Larrabee, H. W. Blaney, E. M. 
Brown, J. E. Dudley, L. M. Johnson, 
N. H. Hill; 1912, S. Williams, A. 
C. Brett, J. A. Harlow. W. R. Bent, 
Jesse Carpenter Jr., L. E. Gelinas, H. 
H. Wood. N. J. Frost, W. J. Weaver 
H. M. Baker, W. E. Philbrick. C. D. 
Roberts, R. K. Clapp, A. F. Kings- 
bury, R. R. Parker, R. N. Hallowell, 
R. W. Wales, A. N. Raymond ; 1913. 
J. P. Pellet, H. B. Bursley, F. D. 
Griggs, B. A. Harris, S. M. Jordan, 
R. J. Borden, D. S. Caldwell, G. A. 
Mallet. E. H. Cooper, H. E. Good- 
nough, H. F. Jones, G. Zabriskie, 
J. A. Macone; 1914, H. L. Eldridge, 
C. E. Heath, R. E. Davis, J. G. 
Hutchinson, A. M. Edgerton, F. J. 
Bittinger, C. A. Bokelund. Short 
course, Rae, Ryder, Fuller, Heatly, 
Otis. Bolten Yale 1913, Selkregg. 



RIFLE TEAM. 

Massachusetts defeated Cornell in 
the weekiy rifie shoot by the score of 
1831 to 1748. Iowa, with whom we 
are tied for first place also won its 
match with Rhode Island, leaving the 
deadlock unbroken, each team having 
won six times and are yet unbeaten. 
The other results of the week in the 
intercollegiate meet are as follows • 

Columbia defeated Missouri, 1857 
to 1731. 

Iowa defeated Rhode Island, 1871 
to 0, by default. 

Massachusetts defeated Cornell, 
1831 to 1748. 

Washington State defeated Prince- 
ton, 1782 to 1654. 

Purdue defeated Ari2ona, 1693 to 
1645. 



UP -TO- DATE 



FOOTWEAR 



PUMPS 



ALL STYLES IN LOW SHOES 



TENNIS SHOES 



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The College Signal, Tuesday, February 28, 19 n 



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Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



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New Hampshire defeated Minne- 
sota, 1658 to 1651. 

North Georgia Aggie defeated Cal- 
ifornia, 1803 to 0, by default. 

No reports had been received from 
the Dartmouth- Louisiana match. Cal- 
ifornia has withdrawn from the contest. 

The standing of the clubs to date Is 
as follows: 

Won. 

M. A. C, 6 

Iowa. 6 

Columbia, 5 

Cornell, 4 

Washington State, 4 

Missouri State, 4 

New Hampshire, 4 

Purdue, 3 

Princeton, 2 

Rhode Island. 2 

Arizona, 1 

The college influence of the country 
are watching with great Interest the 
outcome of the legislation pending in 
Congress for the promotion of rifle 
shooting among the colleges, univer- 
sities and schools by the Issue of arms, 
ammunition and prizes for competition, 
by the government. 

Individual scores (unofficial) for 
Wednesday, Feb. 22: 

Prone. O.H. Totals. 

Brett, A. C, 96 87 183 

Edminister, A. F., 91 87 178 

Lloyd. E. R.. 93 83 176 

McDougall, A. F., 91 84 175 

McLaughlin, F. A., 99 98 197 

Murray, J. K., 90 81 171 

Racicot, P. A., 94 94 188 

Sharpe, A. H., 94 93 187 

Stevenson, L. O., 96 94 190 

Wilde, E.I. . 97 88 185 




Sanderson 



& Thompson. 



The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

\. A» We announce our readiness 

■ to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

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941 889 1830 
(unofficial) for 



Amherst Corner In Rathskellar. 



Prone. O.H. 
85 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 



Individual scores 
Saturday, Feb. 25: 

Baker, H. J.. 94 

Brett. A. C. 91 96 

Edminister. A. F., 90 86 

Lloyd, E. R.. 93 82 

McDougall, A. F., 93 84 

McLaughlin. F. A., 99 94 

Murray, J. K., 94 82 

Racicot, P. A.. 97 94 

Sharpe, A. H,, 97 93 

Wilde, E. I., 89 95 



Totals. 
179 

195 

176 

195 

177 

• 193 

176 

191 

190 

184 



Established 




1851 



Eimer & Amend 




945 89 1 1 836 
The total scores thus far have been 
for the M. A. C. team: I, 1 76 1 ; 
2. 1813; 3, 1825; 4. 1872; 5, 1828; 
6, 1830; 7, 1836 (unofficial). This 
is a total of 12,765 out of a possible 
14,000, an average total score of 
1823 for the first seven shoots. 



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DEBATINC. 

The subject and side for the Rhode 

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Resolved, — That foreign immigration 

should be further restricted. We have 

the negative side and as last year the 

decision was in our favor we want to 

repeat last year's verdict. Everyone 

1 who is or has been a member of 

-, the Debating Club is urged to come 

NIG COllBgG DrUg OlOrB out for Wednesday evening's debate. 



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The College Signal, Tuesday, February 28, 1911 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 28., 1911. (Supplement) 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

EDGAR M. BROWN 1911. Editor-in-Chief 

HAROLD F. WILLARD. 1911. NUiUftnj Editor 
IRVING W. DAVIS 1911. Ahimnl Notes. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY. 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYALN.HALLOWELL.I9I2 Awlttant Editor. 
ALDEN C BRETT. I Q I 2 Collefe Note*. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Deportment Notei. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALI EN 19' I Business Manager 

ALBERT W. DODGE. I 9 I 2 Am. Business Manager 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG Circulation 

S M. JORDAN Circulation 

Subscription $1 SO per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered a* serond-c'ass matter at the Amherst 
PMI Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY. FEB. 28. No. 19 



7-00 p. m. Mandolin Club 
rehearsal in Chapel. 

I Mar. 2—6-45. Y. M. C. A. in 
Chapel. 

J/ar. 4— 6-30. "Mogul" night in 

Social Union room. 
Mar. 5 — 5 p. m. Vespers. Presi- 
dent H. S. Cowell of Ashburn- 
ham. 



The cuts used in this issue could 
not be obtained for the issue of last 
Tuesday. They are important and 
rather than not use them at all it 
seemed best to print them in a late 
edition. 



This Signal is called a special 
Horticultural issue. It is the idea of 
the editor to have reviews of imnortant 
departments both for the benefit of 
electing underciassmen. and to afford 
alumni and outsiders an opportunity to 
see what the nature of our growth and 
work accomplishes. The editor 
wishes to thank the contributors for 
this issue who have made such an 
edition possible. 



On the date of this issue the com- 
petition for the Signal board closes. 
The editor wishes to thank the com- 
petitors for work and the spirit in which 
this work has been performed. The 
system as worked out this year has 
disclosed certain criticism* which can 
be remedied for an other year, but the 
competition brings out material and 
selects the most ardent worker. The 
high point competitors have a position 
as a reward for their efforts and those 
who tried, but failed, have the con- 
scienceness of having tried. and a better 
understanding of their abilities. 

CALENDAR 

(Noiices for this column jhouM be dropped in the 
Signal Office or hands ) to E. M. Brown 1 1 . on or 
beiora the Saturday precedlne each issue | 

Feb. 28 — 6-45 p. m. Stockbridge 
Club in Agricultural Recitation 
room . 

7-00 p. m. Glee Club re- 
hearsal in Chapel. 
7-15 p.m. Junior Landscape 
Club in Wilder Hall. 

Mar. ! 3-30 p. m. Assembly. Dr. 
Frank A. Upayke. of Dart- 
mouth College. 

7-00 P. m. A. Warren Patch 
of Boston. "The Commission 
Man's Side of the Fruit Busi- 
ness. " French. Hail. 
7-00 p. m. : ebating Club in 
Public Sp-aKing Room, 



SIGNAL STANDING FEB. 6 



Carpenter 22.07" 
Williams 21.81 
Harlow 13.26 
Hutchins 4.75 

Zabrjskie 32.44 
Anderson 14.48 



1912 



1913 



Clark 

Wheeler 

Freeborn 

Foster 

Damon 

This standing 



r 



40.94") 
31.46 | 1914 
28.58 
24.99 
4.86 J 

will not be changed 



until next week's issue. 

A. P. Bursley, Comp. Editor. 



PRIZES FOR EXHIBITS 

March 15th which is the "dairy 
day" of the "farmer's week" Is to be 
the biggest day of the week if the plans 
of the Massachusetts Creamery Asso- 
ciation and the Connecticut Valley 
Breeders' Association formulate. The 
idea is to hold a milk and butter 
exhibit : gold, silver, and bronze medals 
to be awarded in the following classes : 
Market milk : class I, certified milk; 
class 2, inspected milk: class 3, mar- 
ket milk. Butter : class I , creamery 
butter from factory separated cream ; 
class 2, creamery butter from gathered 
cream ; class 3, dairy butter. It is 
probable that outside firms will con- 
tribute prizes. The only restrictions 
are that all contestants be residents of 
Massachusetts and exhibits must be 
produced in Massachusetts. Milk 
judging will be done with the United 
States department of agriculture score 
card. The judging for flavor will be 
done by Prof. J. M. Trueman of Con- 
necticut Agricultural College. The 
bacteriological tests will be carried on 
by the college, the chemical tests by 
the experiment station. This is the 
first market milk exhibit held in Mass- 
achusetts. Prof. W. P. B.Lockwood 
is in charge. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 




And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
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» 



INTERCLASS TRACK MEET. 

March I lth, Saturday afternoon, at 
3-00 o'clock is the date which has 
been decided upon as the interclass 
meet. The following events are 
scheduled : 1000 yards run, 600 yards 
run, One mile run, 30 yard dash, High 
jump. 16 pound shot put, Rope climb, 

Pursuit Race between the Sopho- 
more and Freshmen teams to consist 
of five men. No credits or prizes are 
awarded for this event. 

Monday, March 13, at the New 
Haven meet our track association will 
be represented by a team which which 
will run against Wesieyan and The 
College of the City of New York in a 
three cornered one mile relay. 



Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

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FLORICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 

Prof. E. A . White. 
The course is designed to familiar- 
ize students with all phases of the flor- 
icultural industry and to make them 
proficient in the practical work of the 
business so they may be fitted to take 
up commercial work, retail work or 
the management of conservatories on 
private estates. With this object in 
mind the work of the junior year is 
mostly of a practical nature. The 
students are instructed in the practical 
operation of greenhouse watering, 
fumigating and ventilating, in glazing, 
the care of furnaces, and in the meth- 
ods of propagation of greenhouse plants 
by seeds, cuttings, budding and graft- 
ing. In the second semester a study 
is made of the location, arrangement 
and construction of greenhouses; the 
drawing of plans for commercial and 
private ranges, to show foundations 
and details in construction of super- 
structure ; arrangement of heating 
pipes; estimates of comparative cost 
of different methods of construction 
and of the drafting specifications. 

In the senior year the course is 
more technical and scientific. Text- 
books and lectures are used for this 
purpose and all phases of the work not 
considered In the previous year's work 
are covered. 

The department of floriculture is 
endeavoring to make its work valuable, 
not alone to the students taking the 
regular four years' course but to the 
practical florists as well. The short 
course of twelve weeks during January, 
February and March is intended to 
reach just these people. Tuition is 
free and the only expenses are for 
board, text books and the traveling 
expenses incidental to observation 
visits to practical florists' establisb- 
llshments in the state. 

A larger number of florists should 
avail themselves of this opportunity to 
get a large amount of valuable Inform- 
ation at a slight expenditure of time 
and money. The course has been 
given three years and forty men and 
women from various parts of the 
Un ted States have taken the course. 
Most of these now have excellent posi- 
tions and all are of the opinion that 
they benefitted vastly from the course. 
The value of the course lies in the 
fact that all branches of floriculture 
are taught by specialists. 

One of the most successful florists 
in Connecticut who Is a graduate of 
the four years' course at the eotttgt 

[ Continued on pace 6| 




POMOLOGY DEPARTMENT. 

Prof. F. C. Sears. 
One of the most common criti- 
cisms which is heard against college 
graduates, and especially agricul- 
tural college graduates, is that they 
are "not practical"; that they can 
"spend other people's money" man- 
aging farms but "put them on a farm 
of their own and they would starve to 
death." While we don't admit the 
general principle there has been some 
grounds for this feeling in the past. 
The Department of Pomology is at- 
tempting to improve the situation by 
having the students taking work in this 
department do enough of the actual 
practical operations connected with 
fruit growing, such as pruning, spray- 
ing, etc., so that they may become 
thoroughly familiar with every d tall. 
General scientific principles are all 
right and are discussed in the class- 
room, but a man needs to know not 
only that "Heavy pruning of the top of 
a tree tends to increase the production 
of wood," and to know the physiolog- 
ical reasons underlying this principle, 
but if it falls to hs lot he must know 
how to get into an apple tree and 
prune the top heavily and properly. 

In order to successfully carry out 
this line 0? instruction, three things 
are absolutely necessary. 

First, thee must be an abundance 
of all the different types of work con- 
nected with the growing and marketing 
of fruit. To supply this need the plan- 
tations of the department have been 
steadily increased from year to year, 
and this Is still going on. The leasing 
of the old Owen orchard and the buy- 
ing of the Harlow orchard have given 
a lot of the very best type of work for 
class use; the vineyards, the younger 
orchards and some of the small-fruit 
plantations are large enough to give an 
abundance of work in these lines; 
while, as noted in a recent issue of 
the Signal, some very interesting 
types of plantings will be made the 
coming spring. 

Second, the department must be 
supplied with a full equipment of thor- 
oughly first-class and up-to-date tools 
and machinery. it is no use to 
teach a man to spray with an outfit 
ten years old. To supply this equip- 
ment for classes of from 25 to 45 men 
require a large expenditure of money 
but It is gradually being accomplished. 
1 hnr are i dozen or more different 
spraying outfits for class use; 50 indi- 
vidual lookers, each supplied with a 

(Continued on paf* 6] 




DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOCY. 

Dr. H. T. Fernald. 
The necessity for a more wide- 
spread knowledge of insects in their 
relation to man Is each year becoming 
evident. The destruction of crops, 
which these pests cause, their rav- 
ages in gardens, fields and forests; 
their functions as carriers of diseases 
like typhoid, malaria, sleeping sick- 
ness, yellow fever, plague and many 
others, and their general relation to 
health ; these and other relations point 
to the need for a more general knowl- 
edge of the subject. 

To supply as much of this as pos- 
sible is the purpose of the Entomolog- 
ical Department. An introductory 
course planned to supply general in- 
formation about insects, the injuries 
they cause, and how to control them, 
is given first, as many of those taking 
this course cannot continue the sub- 
ject farther, being obliged to specialize 
in other lines. It is of equal use, 
however, to those who take the sub 
ject thereafter, as It gives a general 
view of the entire field. LaU r work 
is planned to quite a large extent, with 
direct reference to the future purpose 
of the studert. Those Intending to go 
into fruit raising, for example, will 
make a special study of the methods 
of controlling fruit insects, while those 
planning to become florists or to take 
up other lines, study the Insects Injur- 
ing the crops they expect to raise. 

At the present time, there is an 
extended demand for men who have 
been trained as entomologists, who 
can act as experts, either connecter* 
with the U. S. Government, as State, 
or as Experiment Station entomolo- 
gists. For the training of such men 
advanced (graduate) courses are also 
provided. 

Facilities for work in this depart- 
ment are of the best. An ample new 
building which contains modern types 
of class rooms and laboratories, 
equipped with the best apparatus, and 
library facilities not excelled anywhere 
in the United States, enabled the stu- 
dent to get the best in every part of 
his work. Large collections are avail- 
able for study whenever these can be 
utilized, and instruction is carried on 
with living forms at work, by means 
of field exercises as far as possible. 
Additions to the teaching staff will 
make possible the development of new 
covrses, now only briefly touched upon, 
and It is hoped to make quite a dis- 
tinct reorganization and development 

[Continued on pace 6] 



LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 

Prof. F. A. Waugh. 

A certain landscape gardener, of 
national reputation, who has taken 
considerable interest in the work at M. 
A. C, has several times given his 
opinion of our courses in this subject. 
He says frankly that the courses are 
all wrong, or pretty much so. but that, 
for some reason or other, this college 
has always turned out better men In 
landscape gardening than any other 
Institution in the country. While we 
may easily believe the latter state- 
ment, we naturally accept the former 
one with some reserve. At the same 
time, it may be possible that the 
courses might be improved. In fact, 
we all expect that they will be consid- 
erably Improved as time goes on. 
Without boasting, we may say that, 
at the present time, we have the most 
extensive, complete and thorough 
courses In practical landscape garden- 
ing which are given anywhere in 
America. 

In this connection we must not for- 
get that many of the courses given 
outside of the department of landscape 
gardening are strictly essential to that 
work. In other institutions, much of 
this work is included in the courses of 
landscape gardening. The work in 
plant materials, now given In the 
department of floriculture, is elsewhere 
nearly always called landscape garden- 
ing. Much of the work in botany and 
entomology, as also the work in sur- 
veying is strictly essential to]the land- 
scape gardening courses. As these 
are well taken care of in the other 
departments, it gives an opportunity to 
devote the entire time In the depart- 
ment of landscape gardening very 
largely to the theoretical and technical 
points of the subject in its strictest 
definition. A large portion of the 
time is devoted to the subject of 
design and to the professional lines of 
practice. 

The main course (outlined in cata- 
log as 1, 2, 3, 4) runs without break 
through the Junior and Senior years. 
This deals with the general principles 
of design and professional practice. 
Course 5 deals with the theory of 
landscape gardening, its relation to 
art, to life and to the natural land- 
scape. It is a broad course, but 
designed to be deep also, and to pre- 
sent the fundamental ideas on which 
the whole art is founded. Course 6, 
as at present given, takes up the 
important subject of architectural 

[Continued on pace 6] 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 28, 191 1. (Supplement) 



The College Signal. Tueaday, February a8, 1911. 



FLORICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 
[Continued from page 5.] 



recently said that the course he found 
most helpful was that given In plant I 
pathology. He had found it especially j 
valuable In combating plant diseases. 

The course given by the florlcultural 
department covers, as thoroughly as 
time will permit, those aspects of the 
work of special interest to the growers. 
Some of the topics to be considered 
are greenhouse construction, green- 
house details, such as ventilators, 
gutters, benches, etc., greenhouse 
furnishings and equipment, heating, 
florists' crops and florists' trade. 

In addition to these lectures given 
by Professor White, other courses are 
given In entomology by Dr. Fernald 



tories, Naiick; William Sim, Clifton- 
dale ; Thomas Roland, Nahant ; and 
others. 

One of the most valuable features 
of the course has been the talks given 
by practical men not connected with 
the college, before the seniors, juniors 
and short course men. This year a 
week was devoted to greenhouse con- 
struction and aside from the regular 
lectures of the department, talks were 
given that week by R. O. King of the 
King Construction Company, North 
Tonawanda ; a representative of Lord 
&, Burnham, Irvingtonon-Hudson and 
a representative from Hitchings & 
Company of New York. 

A second week greenhouse heating 
problems were considered. Mr. F. J. 



POMOLOGY DEPARTMENT 
[Continued from page 5] 

full line of pruning tools, have just 
been installed, while the new storage 
and laboratory building which will be 
completed this spring v.lll make pos- 
sible a great advance in the packing 
and marketing side of the work. 

The third and last and most import- 
ant requisite for the success of this 
type of instruction Is the right attitude 
J towards the work of the men taking 
the course. They must be made to 
feel not only the value of the work but 
their own responsibility for it. Per- 
haps this has not been accomplished 
in all cases but no one can doubt that 
there has been a marked change for 
the better in recent years. 



LANDSCAPE GARDENING 
[Continueo from pace 5] 



design as related to landscape garden- 
ing. Courses 7 and 8 deal with mod- 
ern civic art and the application of 
the principles of landscape gardening 
to city design, village improvement 
and rural improvent. 

A considerable number of students 
are now electing landscape gardening 
and many of them are specializing in 
it with the expectation of securing 
high positions. The calls for men In 
this line are more numerous than ever 
in the past, and all the past graduates 
of this course, who have a natural 
aptitude for the work seem to have 
no difficulty in making places for 
themselves. 




and his assistants ; plant diseases by 
Dr. Stone j soil fertility by Professor 
Hurd; fruit growing by Professor 
Sears. Other courses along similar 
lines of agricultural and horticultural 
subjects may be taken as time will 
permit. 

The lectures are given In the morn- 
ing and the afternoon is spent in prac- 
tical work in the greenhouses, which 
are splendidly equipped for the work. 
Saturdays are devoted to visits to the 
practical greenhouses for observations 
regarding ' methods. Among the 
ranges visited are H. W. Field's, 
Northampton; Montgomery Brothers, 
rose establishment, Hadley ; the col- 
lege conservatories at Smith College 
and Mt. Holyoke College; A. N. 
Pierson, Inc., Cromwell, Conn.; 
Joseph Beach &. Son, South Hadley; 
G. N. Sinclair, Holyoke; Peter 
Fisher, ElTis ; Waban Rose Conserva- 



Elder, heating expert of Lord & Burn- 
ham Company spoke on this subject. 
Other talks during the course were 
given by the following men on the fol- 
lowing subjects. 
W. H. Elliott, Brighton. Rose 

Culture. 
Eber Holmes, Montrose. Rose 

Culture. 
M. A. Patten, Tewksbury. Carnations. 
C. W. Ward, Queens. Long Island. 

Carnations. 
E. J Canning, Northampton. Some 

Hardy Herbaceous Perennials the 

Florist should grow. 
J. Otto Thilow, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Active Floriculture as stimulated 

by the Amateur. 
Edward MacMulkin, Boston. The 

Retail Trade. 
Men and women from any state in 
the Union are eligible for this course. 



FRUIT GROWING SPEAKERS. 

The following speakers on fruit 

growing are expected : 

March 1, A Warren Patch, Boston, 
"The Commission Man's 
Side of tne Fruit Bnsiness." 

March 8, J. H. Hale, South Glaston- 
bury, Conn., "The Horticul- 
tural Awakening in New 
England." 



DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY 
[Continued from page 5] 

of the entire work of the department 
during the coming year. Special 
courses on Forest insects and on In- 
sects and Diseases are already being 
outlined, and other changes are antici- 
pated, locking to an increase in the 
general knowledge of the subjeci 
which can be offered to the students 
of this cpllege. 



'10 — A circular letter has been re- 
ceived from the Rose Hill Nursery 
of Minneapolis, Minn., of which the 
following is an extract: " Each year 
we find an increasing demand from 
our customers for the services of a 
competent landscape designer to draw 
plans or offer suggestions for beautify- 
ing the home grounds. This depart- 
ment of our business Is under the 
management of H. P. Francis who 
is a practical landscape designer." 



A very interesting exhibit is now 
being shown in the drafting room at 
Wilder Hall consisting of severa 
designs for a waiting station at the 
intersection of the college cross-walk 
and the trolley line. These designs 
were prepared by the seniors in land- 
scape gardening as a part of their reg 
ular class work. The exhibit alsc 
includes the design for the same sta- 
tion given by Architect Ritchie of 
Boston. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

•Dave" Caldwell has been elected 
captain of the SoLhomore track team. 

Professor Sears lectured before the 
Lunenberg grange on Saturday Feb. ' 
13th. 

G. E. Howe of Marlboro has been 
elected manager of the Sophomore 
baseball team. 

The gymnasium clashes have been 
resumea after a three aays' vacation, 
caused by the "Prom." 

Professor hUri delivered a lecture 
before the p'iblic school teachers at 
Monson. Saturday morning on 'The 
Work which the College is doing for 
the Public Schools." 

The Massachusetts Stat'' Forester 
has some pmTDhlets which would be 
interesting to those Studying forestry. 
Some of the n are ; Re- .rotation in 
Massachusetts. HcwtoM^k" Improve- 
ment Thinnings, Forest F.res in Mass- 
achusetts, Gypsy and Brown-tail Moths, 
Laws Relating to Forestry. 

Wednesdav. Match '5. has been 
set apart as apple dsy and much of 



a sketch of his life and his associa- 
tions with the various presidents and 
professors besides a picture, which is 
exceedingly good, snapped by Professor 
Waugh. Mr. Canavan. the account 
reads, is "conversant with athletics 
from the time that he accotnDanied 
President Clark to see the 'Aggie' 
crew defeat the leading colleges on the 
Connecticut, to the latest hockey 
victory over Yale." 

President C. A. Smitn of the Sen- 
ior class has appointed the following 
committee :or commencement. P. 
W. Pickard, E. L. Winn, L M. 
Johnson. N. H. Hill, E. A. Larrabee, 
L. O. Stevenson, A. P. Bursley. H. 
W. Blaney. This committee sub- 
divides into the committees, which 
have charge of the details of com- i 
' mencement preparation, such as deco- ( 
rations, invitations and programs, 
i pictures, class gift and so on. These 
tub committees will be announced at 
a later aate. 



BREEDERS' ASSOCIATION 

A meeting of the Connecticut Valley 
interest to apple growers will be seen breeders' association was held at 
and heard at that time. The best Smith's agricultural school in North- 
methods of orchard managem-nt will ampton on the 23d. The program was 
bs disrussea oy C. S. Wilson, pomot- as follows: 9-30 a.m.. meeting of the 
ogist of Cornell University. ' Because Holstein-Friesian. Guernsey. Jersey 
of the full program on 3Dp!e day, it and Avrshire breeders, to formulate 
has been thought best to begin the plansand articles of agreement for the 
work on Tuesday afternoon. promotion oi each breed to be reported 

At the New Eng.ana conference on to the association at large. Rooms to 
Rural Progress -o be held at tie State | °« assigned at time for the respective 
House. Boston on March 3, Prof W. breeds: 1000. business meeting. At 
P. Lockwood of the M. A. C. faculty . this time reports was rece.ved iron, 
Is to give a snort address on "Substi- committees of different breeds. I I 30, 
tutes tor fp-sh milk." On the same address. "Possibilities of ra.sing she»p 
day Prof W R Hart ts to give and swine for profit in New England," 
an address on -The Preparation of ' Dr. A. E. Cance, instructor agricul- 
Teachers of Agriculture from the \ tural economics. Massachusetts agn- 
Standpoint of Pedagogy." before the cultural college; 12-30 p. m. , dinner 
Association for the Advancement of will be served by the domestic science 
Agricultural Education. class, Smith's agricultural school; 

„ „ - 1-30 p. m , address. ••Some problems 

The Massachusetts Fruit Growers 

.. . _ ~ M .in feeding the dairy cow: P. H. 

"*** °< " h " h * V7 « Sm«h. m charge of M and dairy 

' 2I ""*«'"- L F '° S p "division. MuuetaM). =xp.nm„n. 

vice-president and F. Howard Brown 

,. , ,j u i station. 

00 secretary, will hold their annual mmi 

meetings in Worcester on March 8th 
and 9th and among the speakers are 
Prof.W. P. Brocks '75. C. E. Lyman 
78, J. H Putnam '94 W. A. Munsay 
'05 of the alumni and Dr. H. F. Fer- 
nald, Prof. F. C. Sears and A. J. 
Norman of the Faculty. 

Prof. E. A. White has recently 
returned from a week's trip through 
the central states, wtiere he attended 
the annual meeting oi the Illinois Flor- 
ists Association held at Urbana, III., 
and inspected the floricultural depart- 
ment at the University of Illinois. 
While in Chicago he visitea the largest 
greenhouse establishment in the United 
States, which covered 40 acres of 
ground. He also visited the floricul- 
tural department of Cornell University 
at Ithaca, N. Y. 



STATISTICS OF NEW YORK 
ALUMNI 

Mr. President and Brethren: 

On a call issued by Barrett '75, 
Hubbard '78 and myself, a meeting 
was held in the apartment of my 
father (on his invitation) Oct. 27, 
1886 at which were present Thomp- 
son '72. Barrett '75, Phelps 76. 
Hubbard 78, B. S. Smith 79, Chase 
and Cutter '82, Hewia '83 and Barber 
'85 ; temporary organization was 
effected and our first annual reunion 
was held Dec. 10, 1886, at which 
were present President Goodell and 
Captain Morris (now brigadier-general 
retiien) and 26 graduate and non- 
graauate alumni with Asa W. Dick- 
inson 74. in the chair; the club has 
since met annually without a break, a 
A recent Sunday Globe contains an recorc j not equalled by our Boston 
article about Thomas Canavan "the oret h ren At times the attendance has 
veteran -Aggie' jani' 1 M includes Deen as | ow as fourteen but the flame 



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of loyalty to M. A. C. has always 
i burned brightly, 

In 1906 President Butterfield met 
with us for the first time and the 
number present was but 51 ; In 1907 
: Dr. Winfield Ayres '86, held the office 
of president, and it was keenly felt that 
an unusual effort should be made to 
I markedly increase the attendance: 
! under his leadership and management 
' a campaign of advertising was inaugu- 
rated resulting in a reunion with 35 at 
the board ; under President Lyman in 
1908, 43 were in attendance ; with 
president Lublin in 1909. 63 sat down 
to the Massachusetts Aggie board, 
while in 1910 under the command of 
Captain Fowler, 74 celebrated our 25th 
reunion; at this last dinner, 21 new 
members were made not including four 
guests who were not qualified for the 
membership roll. 

The following have become mem- 
bers by attendance : Of the trustees. 
3, of the non-alumni faculty, 
IS; and of graduate and non-gradu 
ate alumni, 167, making a total mem 



We Tarry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 









AMHERST BOOK STORE 



H. W. FIELD 

... FLORIST ... 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



OPP. ACAUKMV OF Ml M< , 

NORTHAMPTON, mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 28, 1911. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 28, 191 1. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 

G. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 




AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



/ffcy*VV^6<6<^ft^^^ 



H. E. KINSMAN, 



FOR 12 YKARS OFFICIAL 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

AT WILLIAMS COLLEGK 

Has just opened an up-to-date and thoroughly equipped 
Studio for high grade work, in the 

NASH RL(X:K, MAIN STREET, BMHCRST 

Where absolute satisfaction is guaranteed every customer. 
All styles, up-to-date and prices reasonable. 



The place to have your group and single pictures taken correctly. Call 
and make your appointments. Visitors welcome. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone 59-4 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 



Specialty of Repairing- 



Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
• Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 
Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, • Mats. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DEXTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amhekst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 

etoiuA.M. i.aotosi>. ivi. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



Olvmpia Candv Go, 



257 Main St., 
Northampton, 



Mass. 



ALL KINDS OF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



bership of 188; 13 other gentlemen, 
alumni of Yale, Coettingen, New 
York University, Union, Oxford, Co- 
lumbia, C^eorge Washington, George- 
town, Williams, Amherst, Cornell, 
University Michigan and Mass Insti- 
tute of Technology, have been present 
as guests of the club or of its 
members. 

Those now among the immortals: 
Goodell, Stockbridge, Goessmann, 
Aivord, Parker and Totten of former 
faculties; of the classes, J. C. Cutter 
78; Somers 72; Asa W. Dickinson 
(incomparable presiding officer), Wil- 
liam Lyman and F. A. Towns 74; 
Walter M. Dickinson, H. F. Parker 
and C. H. Sputhworth 77; Flint and 
Warner '81 and Woodhull '85. 

The class of '82 has the largest 
enrollment, 16; 72 second with 9 and 
78 with 8; '90 and '99 have had 
none present ; the class of ' 1 1 was 
represented in December by the editor- 
in-chief of the Signal and the year 
previous, the same representative 
officer and the: captain of the football 
eleven were present from the class cf 
1910. 

It is interesting to note beside 7 
M. A. C. alumni who have been pres- 
ent as faculty representatives, the 
other 18 faculty representatives are 
alumni of Amherst, Goettingen, West 
Point, Trinity, Williams, Purdue, 
Harvard, Kansas Agricultural College, 
Cornell, Bowdoin, Universities of 
Vermont, Maine and Michigan and 
last but very far from least our sister 
institution, the Michigan Agricultural 
College. 

Another interesting matter is since 
1905 we have had but three new rep- 
resentatives of the faculty with us, Dr. 
Butterfield, Captain Martin and Assist- 
ant Professor Haskell; your secretary 
is of the oDinion that President Butter- 
field keeps his force at work ; we wish 
those who have been to us to keep 
coming and we much desire to see 
the newer men. 

Of the trustees Mr. Dickinson has 
thrice been with us, Mr. Gleason twice 
and Mr. Ellis made his first appear- 
ance December last; may they come 
\ often and bring more of the fathers of 
the college. 

Your secretary cannot refrain from 
calling attention to the many attend- 
ances of Goodell, Stockbridge, Parker 
and Totten. Goodell came and came 
till failing health prohibited ; Stock- 
bridge was with us twice; Parker, 
who in wit, information and brevity 
was the best after dinner speaker I 
have heard, for many times was with 
us, and Totten, and how we miss his fel- 
lowship and abounding lo«e for M.A.C. 

Among notable speeches we can 
cite only these : 1889 the address of 
, Dr. William P. Brooks 75, on Pres- 
ident Clark and perhaps of my father, 
Dr. Ephraim Cutter, Yale '52. on 
"Why I sent my son to M. A. C"; 
1895 of Lieutenant W. M. Dickinson, 
U. S. A. and M. A. C. 77 ; 1898 of 
President Goodell, Professor Parker 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



Wright 
& Ditson 

Football and Basketball suits 
the standard at all leading 
colleges. The Wright & 

Ditson Shots and Head 
Guards tJie best and most pract- 
ical, also Skates and Hockey 
Goods. The Wright cV Dit- 
4L son Sweaters have 
^J\\i long Seen recognized 
as the best. 



4 




> College Students and Athletes 
who want the real, superior 
articles for the different sports 
"•• •"*' °" should get the kind that bear 
our trade-mark. Catalogue free. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

22 Warren Street, New York City. 

84 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III. 

359 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

76 Weybosset Street, Providence, R. I. 

Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaninu 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. W. Blaney, 'n, 
C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, E. L. Winn, 87 
Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursday, 
Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green* 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
< arnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only Jrom 1 A. M. to 4 A.M. 



Great River Water Power Co. 

E.A.&'S.A. ALLEN, Props. 
Office, Gillett Block. 

WESTFIED, MASS. 



ROOMS WITH HEAT, 
POWER dt LIGHT 

Fi* O R Kt R K T 



and Lieutenant Totten in memory of 
Lieutenant Dickinson, who died from 
the result of wounds received in action 
at El Caney ; 1899 of Prof. William 
H. Brewer, Yale '52, (present because 
of the thoughtfulness of James H. 
Webb 73) and of William Ives Wash- 
burn, Amherst 76; 1900 of Bain- 
bridge Colby, Williams *90; 1901 of 
Prof. William R. Ware, establisher of 
the architectural departments of M.I.T. 
and Columbia, who showed, the defi- 
nite connection between agriculture 
and architecture to the landscape 
gardening and thereby directly pro- 
moted the present teaching of such at 
M.A.C; 1908 of Dr. Robert T. 
Morris, trustee of Cornell university, 
distinguished surgeon and splendid 
demonstrator of the value cf intensive 
agriculture: 1910 Ex-Secretary Cor- 
telyou's tribute to the value of the 
college, Dr. Charles F. Chandler's 
comprehensive resume of the work of 
Clark and Goessmann and that of 
Daniel Willara '82, president of the 
Baltimore &. Ohio railroad, on what 
he got out of the college in the six 
months he was there and of the 
supreme importance of the growing 
of crops. It seems invidious to pick 
out from the wealth of our records no 
more, but this record must close with 
the following : 

Dr. Goessmann was with us at the 
1896 dinner, his only appearance; 
then swifily approaching the age of 75 
years, he enjoyed our fellowship and 
spoke with all his splendid force and 
wisdom ; we have safely preserved 
his holographic letter to John B. 
Minor 73, president of 1905 reunion. 
A graduate of the class of 1 894 saia 
to his elder son a tew days before the 
Doctor's death, "Please tell your 
father he has been worth to Massa- 
chusetts a million dollars' '; and when 
the son conveyed the message to his 
father, he serene in his faith, his life 
work and the love of his wife, turned 
to her and said "There is my million 
dollars." For such a man surely is 
the Kingdom of Heaven. 
Respectively submitted, 

John A. Cutter, Secretary. 



BALED SHAVINGS 

put up in attractive shape, 

in car lots. 

PRICE ON APPLICATION 



FRANK S. O'BRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND MACK 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 



8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, - • MASS. 

Telephone 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

LIBRARY. 

Another very desirable gift received 
by the Library is the large number of 
"Reports of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science" 
given to the Library by the City Library 
Association of Springfield. These 
reports are being bound in desirable 
form and will make a very welcome 
addition to the collection of publica- 
tions of learned and scientific societies. 

Other new books recently received 
at the Library are : 
Civics and Health. Allen. 
Science of Living. Sadler. 
Health, Strength and Power. Sargent. 
Land and Labour, Lessons from Bel- 
gium. Rountree. 
Poultry Laboratory Guide. Lewis. 
Practical Track and Field Athletics. 
Clark. 



»I0. — H. R. Francis has charge of 
the landicape department of the Rose 
Hill Nursery, Minneapolis, Mtnn. 



' ■ ' 



— ' * * ' • 



FATIMA 



% 




■■* 




With each package of 
Fatima you get a pen- 
nant coupon, 25 of 
which tecure a hand- 
tome fell college pen- 
nanti 1 2x32) -flec- 
tion of 100. 



& 



*■ 

■■ 



TURKISH 

BLEND 

CIGARETTES 



ETYMOLOGY 



Worcb, Words, Wc^3 
— it t-kc3 "bunches" cf 
words to describe Fati- 
mas. They're so indi- 
vidual, so different. Just 
smoke one, and get t!iat 
indescribable sa; sfacllcn 
that comes from a perfect 
blend of rare tjbaccos. 
My word — but they're 
fine. 20 for 1 5c — an 
inexpensive package — 
and you get ten additional. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 

' i 

: v . ' i fc-ii;n ; ;-:Mi ; ; a : . wV i " i» «^i--l ii;ii :: ; ; V- -r'-V ry ai t i ii i — rfr~"T i> i a 



■:■:■ 






Orchards Pay Better Than Gold Mines When Fertilized With 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 



The Massachusetts State Hoard of Agriculture Offered a Mm for the Most Profitable A. ra ol 
Massachusetts Orchards. This Contest Has Recently Closed, and the 

PRIZE IS WON BY THE DRBW-MUNSON PRUlt CO., of Littleton. Mas. 

Their t'rize Winning Acre of Baldwin Apples 
GAVE THEM A TOTAL RETURN OF $7I*.7»-THE NET PROFIT WA» MI9.0S 



^ s r?^gS R wrr A H S KillIE THQmilS PHOSPHITE nWIB^!»%UYc8iE 



The K ill iwing Letter Krom Barnes Brothers, the Famous Fruit Growers and Orchardiets of 

Yalesville, Conn., Shows That Thomas Phosphate Powder Brings a Prize to 

Kvery User in the Form of a Profitable Crop : 



Thf. Cor Mortimer Company, 
Gentlemen : 

I n regard to Thomas Phosphate Pmvder, 
you will recall that we bought of you last year 
130 tons and we wish to say that it gave us most 
ex. client results. On our peach orchard where 
we usrd it. the trees made a splendid growth 
■with heavy dark green foliage, the fruit was of 
excellent color, and the keepmg\qualities were re- 



markable, which was a big advantage, especial- 
ly when we had over no cars to harvest in about 
two weeks as we had this year. 

We never saw better colored Baldwin Apples 
than those we grew where we applied a good 
dressing of Thomas Phosphate Powder The 
best sola at retail for Jtg.oo per barret. 

Yours truly, 

Barnes Brothers. 



THERE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS POR YOU I 

The whole story is told in the New Edition of our Booklet, 't'p-'l o Date 
Fruit Growing," which is sent free if you mention The College Signal. 

The Coe-Mortimer Co.^p^j^s 24-26 Stone St., N. Y. City 

We also distribute from Boston, Mass.; Belfast, Maine; Baltimore, 
Mo.; Phila.. Pa.; Norfolk, Va.; Savannah, Ga.; Charlston. S. C. 






The College Signal, Tuesday, February z8, 1911, 



pi. J. Lapone, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



BUTO LIVERY HORSE 

Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 

Tel. 183. 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Si/in > i 

t • '-til '• 
\taaa j 



Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kngraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

Wo fA 9 C 57 * 3 PrankHn Street « 
?▼ <I1U O BOSTON. 



THE 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers a thorough training in agricultural 
vocations that are not yet overcrowded, 
and in which there are constantly increas- 
ing opportunities for employment. 

NECESSARY EXPENSES MODERATE 

LOCATION OF COLLEGE IDEAL 

ATTENDANCE RAPIDLY INCREASING 

For complete catalog or specific informati- 
on, write to 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 



ALL OF THE 



KEN YON L. BUTTERFIELD, President l\ W« rLUlHD 

j Barber Shop 



AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



VARSITY MEN The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 
Football Association, 
Track Association, 
Hockey Association, 
Tennis Association, 
N-neteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 
Nineteen Hundred and Tnirteen Index, 
Y. M. C. A., 
Fraternity Conference, 
Musical Association, 
Stockbridge Club, 
' Rifle Club, 
M. A. C. Dramatic Society. 
Debating Society, 
Public Speaking Council, 



and most of the upperclassmen 
wear 

DUDLEY 

HAND KNIT 

Shaker Sweaters 



H. W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

J. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

0. G. Anderson. Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis. President 

H. C. Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill. President 

A. H. Sharps, President 

J. E. Dudley. Jr.. President 

R. C. Barrows. President 

I. C. Gilgore, President 



•TIIKRE IS A REASON." 



When Fitting Out Your Room 



EDWARD l_ HAZEN 1-4 Remember tnat Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 



AC.KNT KOR 



Towels, Etc. Also denims for 
that corner seat. 



DUDLEY ATHLETIC GOODS 



AT M. A. C. 



BASSALOTTI & GENTASO 

FRUIT. 

CONFECTIONERY, 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

BRICKS TO TAKE HOME. 

CORNKK AMITY & PLEASANT STREETS 



JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 



Boot & Shoes Repaired 

FIRftT CLAM WORK 

Amherst, ... Mass. 



JACKSON &f CUTLER 



THE H. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 

STAMFORD, CONN. 




BOYDEN'S 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424- 1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUKACTITRKRS OP 



Restaurant and Bakery \J N I FORMS 



Catering 
a Specialty 

1 96-200 Main St., Northampton, Miss. 



Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. r 



All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 

COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

HKST of Cleansing, Pkmmmo, 
Dyking, and Repairing. 

TICKMT SYSTMM 



No. ly Pleasant St., Rear Henry h "isli's 
Store. 
G. N. Lk.w and C. K. Roheki-. 



CARS 



Leave AO/JIE COLLEGE for HOI - 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOAilE CO I • 
LEUE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Cars at ReasonaNe Rates 

AMHERST & SUNDERLANO ST. RY. CO 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, %». Weekly, V- 



THT COLLEGE 



Vol. XXI. 



fcj 



IASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, March 7, 1911. 




No. 20 



RESUMt 

Table of Statistics of Rifle Team and 
Individual Members. 



At the beginning of the college year 
the rifle club entered a team to shoot 
in the intercollegiate league, held 
under the auspices of the National 
Rifle Association. This league is 
composed of sixteen teams, who, 
according to the schedule were 
matched for one shoot a week each, 
giving a schedule of fifteen matches to 
be shot. The prospects of the Massa- 
chusetts team were of the brightest. 
There were seven men who were on 
the gallery championship team of last 
year, form the nucleus of the team, 
besides 57 new candidates reporting. 
The gallery had been reconstructed 
and put in first class shape, with the 
only disadvantage of lack of room. 
We were very fortunate in being able 
to have the rifles refitted with new 
barrels and put in first class condition. 
The call was made Jan. 1st and 
practice began at once. The squad 
was rapidly cut down until a worKing 
squad of eleven men was available. 
The work of the team this year has 
been very satisfactory. The scores 
have always been of good margin but 
show possibilities of being much higher 
as the team settles down to consistent 
work. In every match of the season 
so far, the team total has been reduced 
by at least three or four low individual 
scores, but a constant gain has been 
recorded. These are not discourag- 
ing as in every case they have been 
due to the unstableness which charac- 
terizes the early season's work. 

The work of McLaughlin has been 
of the highest grade and really phenom- 
enal. The first part of the season he 
had difficulties with his rifle, necessi- 
tating three changes but as soon as he 
secured his present rifle his scores 
jumped to the highest of the league 
returns. In the last four matches he 
has earned an average of 193.25, 
making the grandest run ever made in 
intercollegiate gallery shooting. 

Brett seems to have found his pace 
in the last two matches, getting well 
above 190. Racicot's work has just 
begun to show its usual form and we 
look for him to put in his usual high 
scores from now on. Stevenson's work 
is not up to his usual standard, due to 
lack of practice but he is now gaining 
rapidly. Baker has been doing the 



FARMERS' WEEK 

Prominent Speakers to be Heard at 
Annual Gathering. 

Farmers' week, which is of annual 



HOCKEY ELECTION 



PRACTICE BEGINS 



Hockey Team Elects Captain and Man- 
ager. 

At a meeting of the. Hockey team 



occurrence, comes this year from j Curtis Peckham '12 of New Bedford, 
March 13 to 17. During the week, ! was elected captain for the season of 
a very instructive and practical pro 



1911-1912. Captain Peckam pre- 
pared at New Bedford High school 




gram will be carried out. The exer- 
cises for the week have been divided 
into three divisions : horticulture, gen- 
eral agriculture, the womens' section. 
The first day will be given over to a 
general welcome. President Butterfield 
giving the opening address and being 
followed by George S. Ladd of Stur- 
bridge. The section on agriculture 
will be addressed on Tuesday by the 
following speakers : Prof. S. B. Has- 
kell, Dr. W. E. Taylor of Mollne, 
Prof. W. D. Hurd, Prof. J. A. Mc- 
Lane. On this day, the section on 
horticultute will have for speakers: 
Prof. F. A. Waugh, Prof. E. A. 
White. E. J. Canning of Northamp- 
ton. The womens' section will be where he played hockey four years, 
addressed by: Prof. Joseph Chamber- also playing foootbail and baseball, 
lain, and Miss Bertha E. Shapleigh of He has played in every game since the 
Columbia University. In the evening, game was established here and has 



Capt. Curtis Peckham 



MATCH TOTALS (Individual) 



ln-.ividiafl 
ToMls 



Sharpe Ml. 
McLaughlin '11. 
Baker 'II. 
Racicot 'II. 
Stevenson 11. 
Brett ' 12. 
Lloyd '12. 
Murray 14. 
McDougall '13. 
Edminster, '13 
Wilde '12, 
Walker 12. 
Robinson ,11. 
'Johnson '14. 
Match (Team) 



j 187 


192 


197 187 


187 185 


187 190 


1512 


I 181 179 


184 190 


197 188 


197 193 


1509 


173 182 


186 189 


18' 184 


— 179 


1472 


174, 181 


193 182 


190 190 


188 191 


1489 


167 177 


171 176 


188' — 


190 — 


1069 


— 


184 


— ■ — 


192 187 


183 195 


941 


184 


183 


179 179 


189 178 


176 175 


1441 


— 


— 


187 184 


185 185 


171 176 


1088 


— 


— 


189 186 


181 187 


175 177 


1095 


174 


182 


169 171 


— 180 


178 176 


1230 


175 


175 


— 176 


— 


185 184 


895 


187 


— 


— ■ — 


182 170 


- 


539 


i — 


178 


170 - 


i 


378 


159 


— 


— — 




— — 


159 


1761 


1813 


1825 1820 


1872 1828 1830 1836 


14582 



tndtvl jual 
Aversce. 

189.00 
188.63 
182.00 
186 13 

178 16 
188 20 
180 37 
181.17 
182.50 
175 71 
179.00 

179 67 
174.00 
159.00 
182.27 



Total points scored. 14582. 

•Left college. 



Team average, 1822 75. Individual average 182.27 



Baseball Squad Reports. Outlook for 
Season Bright. 

A large number of candidates have 
reported to the cage for baseball prac- 
tice, and judging from the early re- 
sponse, Captain Williams will not lack 
for material. At present the practice 
necessarily confind to battery practice, 
but an opportunity is also given to all 
candidates for "limbering up." They 
are also required to run the usual 
number of laps around the track. 

The college is fortunate In securing 
the services of Jack Chesbroas coach 
again this season. His major league 
experience, and his ability to coach 
were very evident last season during 
the short period in wnich he had charge 
of the team. Since we lost only two 
varsity men last year by graduation, 
and have plenty of candidates to 
choose from, the outlook for 1911 Is 
encouraging. 

The following men have thus far re- 
ported for practise : 

Pitchers: — 191 1 N. H. Hill, 1912 
Captain Williams; 1913 S. D. Samp- 
son; 1914 Sherman, Coe, Davies, Ed- 
wards, Dunne. Wing, Damon and 
Powers. Catchers :— 1913 Hunting 
ton, O'Brien; 1914 Be van, Brewer, 
Edgerton, Eldridge, Hlggins. Jones, 
Morse and Shirley. Infielders: 
1911 Bentley, Piper ; 1912 Ackerman; 

1913 Covlll. Little, C. H. Brewer; 

1914 Gibson. G-ebin. Heath, Palmer. 
Peters, Hutchinson and G. Reed. 
Outfielders: — 1912 McGarr; 1914 
Bokeland. Besser, McNiffand Wooley. 

The baseball schedule subject to 
the approval of the athletic board is as 
follows : 



most consistant work of the team ' ker will be C . S. Wilson of Cor- 

While never taking the lead he has,' ..,._..__,_ .u.. — i. 

maintained a good average, never 



in the chapel, the following will speak: , always been a fast, consistent player, 
Hon. J. L. Ellsworth, secretary of the playing one of the forward positions 
state board of agriculture, and Dr. H. where he can be depended on for care- 
J. Weller of Cornell. On Wedndes- Jul and accurate work, 
day, come dairy day and apple day. 
For the former occasion, the Massa- 
chusetts Creamery Association and 
the Connecticut Valley Breeders' 
Association will meet at the college. 
Lectures will be given by E. D. Howe, 
a trustee of the college, Prof. J. M. 
Truman of Storrs, Conn., and P. M. 
Harwood of the dairy bureau. 
Speakers in the other sections will be : 
Prof. C. S. Wilson of Cornell, Pro- 
fessor Sears and Professor Fernald, 
Miss Frances Stern of M. I. T., and 
Miss H. L. Johnson. The apple day 




April 12. 


Brown at Providence 


" 14. 


Tufts at Amherst 


" 22. 


Williams at Wllllamstown 


" 29. 


Dartmouth at Hanover 


May 1. 


Norwich at Amherst 


" 3. 


Sprlngfeld Training School 




at Amherst 


'• 1 1. 


Wesleyan at Mlddletown. 


" 13. 


W. P. I. at Amherst 


" 19. 


Holy Cross at Worcester 


•« 20. 


Trinity at Hartford 


" 25. 


Tufts at Medford 


" 27. 


Rhode Island at Kingston. 




R. 1. 


" 30. 


S. T. S. at Sprlngfild 


June 9. 


Syracuse at Amherst 


" 17. 


Amherst at Pratt Field 



nell. It is planned to begin this work 

. on Tuesday afternoon, 
varying more than two or three points Thursday> the l6th ^U b e"com 
from week to week. Lloyd has had , ^ ^ ^ question w „, be 

some difficulty in getting settled down ^ ^ ^ Qf ^ polnts fay fhe 



[Continued oo pat* 2J 



f Continued oo pace 2J 



Mgr. H. H. Wood 
At the same time Howard H. Wood; 
'12 of Shelburne Falls, was chosen j 
manager for the coming year. He 
was assistant manager last year and 
managed the team on several trips. 

t Continued on pace 2] 



Mr. Upham of Three Rivers wai 
the speaker at the Y. M. C. A. meet- 
ing Thursday night. After the meet- 
ing was over, Professor J. E. Rice of 
| Cornell University gave an illustrate i 
lecture on poultry after which a ques- 
tion box was opened. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 7, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 7, 1911. 



FARMERS' WEEK 

[Continued from page 1 .] 

following: H. D. Haskins of the Ex- 
periment Station, Professor Brooks, 
Professor Foord and Prof. F. F. Tay- 
lor of N. H. S. Other speakers will 
be G. E. Taylor, P. E. Davis, H. S. 
Chapin, E. S. Fulton and G. E. 
Stickney. A corn show will be held 
during the day. The other speakers 
of the day follow: Mr. Heller, Prof. 
F. F. Moon, Prof. G. E. Stone, 
C. H. White and Hon. C. C. James 
of Toronto. The women's section 
will be entertained by Miss Flora Mac- 
donald and Mary S. Woolman. On 
Friday rural community betterment 
will be taken up, and the following 
speakers will be heard from : W. E. 
Riley, Mrs. A. J. Hopkins, Miss Sadie 
Brown of the Mass. Library commis- 
sion, Mrs, Margaret Barnard, Mrs. 
Margaret Wright, Prof. F. B. Loomis 
of Amherst College, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Jenkins, and Pres. K. L. Butterfied. 
The women's section will have its 
headquarters ai Wilder Hall during 
the week. Various exhibits will be 
held in the basement of South College, 
the new animal husbandry building and 
the Entomological building. 



HOCKEY ELECTION 

[Continued from page I ] 



It is his intention to obtain a coach 
for a part of the season at least and to 
arrange for ten or twelve games Includ- 
ing games with Harvard, Cornell and 
Princeton in addition to teams played 
this past season. He hopes to arrange 
two or three games to be played in the 
Boston Arena. 



RIFLE CLUB 

[Continued from page 1] 



and his work this season has not shown 
what he is capable of doing. The 
work of the new men has been of high 
standard, promising to be of material 
strength to the team. Murray and 
McDougall have been shooting among 
the leaders and are making some of 
the old men look to their places. 
Edminster and Wilde have both shot 
some good scores but lack the con- 
sistancy which one season's experience 
will bring. 

Thus we find the material of this 
year's team of better grade than the 
winning team of last year, the body of 
the team having had an additional 
year's experience, and the new mater- 
ial of a strengthening character. The 
benefits which will accrue from the 
services of a competent coach will be 
the last factors necessary to reduce 
the team to a well balanced unit capa- 
ble of high class work. While the 
loss of Coach Baptiste has been felt 
very keenly by the team, both as a 
coach and as an associate, we are 
exceedingly fortunate in being able to 
secure a man who has received his 
training in the same school of rifle 
shooting and has been the coach of the 
successful George Washington Univer- 
sity team for seyeral years. Sergt. 



Schrieber of the United States Marine 
Corps has been detailed to be with us 
until June 15th and his arrival is daily 
expected. Another man who has 
been a friend of the team and whose 
services are always available is J. W. 
Hessian, military representative of the 
U. M. C. Arms Co. Mr. Hessian 
has always taken a gre?t interest in 
the team, visiting college last spring 
and giving us the benefit of his experi- 
ence. He accompanied the outdoor 
team to Washington last June and also 
visited, us last week when valuable 
talks and exhibitions brought to the 
notice of the men the small factors of 
the game which go to make up the 
important points of high class shooting. 
In this connection it is by no means 
out of place to mention the very court- 
eous attention we have received from 
the U. M. C. people. At the first of 
the year after several tests, this com- 
pany's ammunition was decided upon 
and steps were immediately taken to 
secure the exchange of all the other 
manufactures. We have always found 
it superior to the other makes and the 
boys all swear by it. 

Probably no other man connected 
with the college has been of such 
benefit in making and maintaining the 
records established in rifle shooting at 
this institution as Capt. Martin. The 
drudgery of routine work, the incidents 
of daily practice all are of insignificant 
influence thru the sympathy and co- 
operation of his support. He has pro- 
vided the team with a complete and 
valuable equipment, placing at its dis- 
posal everything necessary for its suc- 
cess. He has been a constant attend- 
ant at all the matches, and aside from 
his capacity as official judge has given 
the men the Inestimable value of his 
confidence. He is greatly pleased by 
the showing the men are making and 
predicts another championship for this 
season's work. 

We are very well pleased with the 
support of the student body, the alumni 
the faculty, and everyone interested In 
the institution. The records of the 
team have been followed closely and 
already manifestations of the material 
support necessary for the continuance 
of shooting have been received. Let- 
ters are daily arriving from all parts of 
the country where M. A. C. men are 
located, containing words of apprecia- 
tion and encouragement; also dona- 
tions which are greatly appreciated. 
The student body and faculty are 
expresssing their interest in the prepa- 
rations for financial support of the 
team. 

In closing we would take this oppor- 
tunity ef extending our thanks to those 
who are working for the success of this 
season's matches. The confidence 
of the team is of the highest character. 
We believe that not only will the out- 
door and indoor intercollegiate cham- 
pionship trophies be held another year, 
but that the additional trophy offered 
the winning team of the league, will be 
presented to this college. 



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Jewelers and Silversmiths, 



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Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



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There are seven good reasons 
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Captain Sharpe is maintaining the 
usual high standard of this work lead- 
ing his team in individual totals and 
average. The work of coaching the 
team has been resting entirely upon 
him and he merits the confidence 
placed in him to lead the team for the 
second year. From the introduction 
of rifle shooting at this institution he 
has given much valuable time and the 
success which the teams have had is 
due to his efforts. He has the loyal 
support of the entire student body, who 
appreciate his efforts and are justly 
proud of the work of the team. 

COMMUNICATION 

(Communication! to the Signal concerning mat- 
ters of caneral interest are welcomed. The Signal 
la not to be held responsible (or the opinions thus 
expressed.) 

Editor College Signal: 
Dear Sir : 

It may please you to learn of 
the great interest being shown in our 
rifle team by the Alumni of the col- 
lege. Evidently the press reports of 
the matches with the various colleges 
are being watched closely for during 
the past week I have had three letters 
from former graduates of the college 
speaking in highest terms of the work 
being done and I am greatly pleased 
to say that all contained checks. No 
appeal had been made for money but of 
course money is greatly needed and it 
is hoped that many more of the Alumni 
will forward contributions. 

Below you will find a copy of one of 
the letters: — 

•■Capttain G. C. Martin: 

Amherst, Mass. 
My Dear Captain Martin : — 

I cannot refrain from sending 
you the enclosed check, which I wish 
could be much larger, for the support 
of the rifle team. 1 know last year 
contributions were accepted and only 
hope they are this year, so as to give 
us some chance to support our teams. 

The scores look mighty "good to 
me" and now I hope you will send the 
fellows hard after Iowa. 

My kindest regards to I am 

Sincerely yours, etc." 

This letter came from the far West. 
The check was for $3 and I only hope 
that there are a great many like- 
minded among the Alumni, for we 
must raise a good sum if the team is 
to take part in all the matches, in- 
door and outdoor. 

Very truly yours. 
Geo. C. Martin. 
Captain U. S. Army, retired, 

Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 

Amherst, Mass., March 4th, 1911. 

The assembly on Wednesday was 
addressed by Professor Updike of 
Dartmouth who spoke on the subject 
"The Responsibility of the College 
Man." 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

ie £ , MMa w S the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every prke ts a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 






C&rp*ivter & Morehous*, 

PRINTERS, 



No. i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Established 




1851 



m n 



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205-2 U Third Ave., Cor. 18th St. 



New York 



Headquarters Fok 



Chemicals, Chemical, Physical, Bacteriological 
Apparatus and Assay Goods 

We carry the largest stock of Laboratory Supplies in the U. S. 

PROMPT SERVICE 



The College Drug Store 



The Rifle Team reported in uniform 
at the chapel Friday afternoon, and its 
picture was taken by L. O. Stevenson 



Our European connections are such that we are enabled to offer you 
the best service for duty-free importations on scientific supplies at the 
lowest prices. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 7, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 7, 1911. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITOR 8. 

EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, EdKor-ln-Chlef. 

HAROLD P. WILLARD, 1911. M»n»rln K Editor. 
IRVING W. DAVIS. 1911. Alumni Notes. 

ALLYN P. BURSLEY, 1911. Competition Editor. 
ROYALN.HALLOWELL.I912. Assistant Editor. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912. College Notes. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT, 1912, Department Notes. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

PARK W. ALLEN 1911. Business Manager. 

ALBERT W.DODGE. I 9 1 2 Aset. Business Manager. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. Circulation. 

S. M. JORDAN. Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Park W. Allen. 



Entered as secoad-claaa matter st the Amherst 
Peat Office. 

Vol. XXI. TUESDAY. MARCH 7. No. 20 



The Signal wishes to congratulate 
Captain Peckham and Manager Wood 
upon their election, and extends the 
hope of a most successful hockey sea- 
son next year. 



With the arrival of these spring- 
like days, the necessity for new 
walks and repairs on old walks about 
the campus is manifested. With the 
erection of each new building must 
also come new paths, and since more 
buildings have been made recently, the 
situation is one which we feel needs 
prompt attention. 



The first month of the present 
semester is now past and it is safe to 
say that many of the good resolutions 
made during finals have been disre- 
garded. Remember that the exam- 
inations come again, and the easiest 
preparation is daily, through the 
course. 

Another bit of admonition which we 
wish to give is concerning the tendency 
to criticise the college, especially when 
the "spring-fever" becomes prevalent. 
Fault finding, if it remedies unsatis- 
factory conditions, is legitimate ; but 
it usually does not. Now some of 
our college affairs may not be to our 
liking and to change them is a problem ; 
but possibly you can aid in bettering 
them, instead of finding fault. Other 
institutions have their short-comings 
and many too — so rather look at the 
good things, the advantages, and help 
make M. A. C. more meaningful to 
each one. 



could have been rendered and we antic- 
ipate from the new editors more 
efficiency than we possessed. It is 
because of this hope, for a more pros- 
perous future, and because, too, of 
that feeling which comes from con- 
tinued effort that we take pleasure in 
leaving. It is hoped that more per- 
sonal effort will be put into the paper 
which makes for character and 
personnel. 

The editor wishes to commend the 
services of the retiring seniors. The 
managing of the business part of the 
paper's administration deserves praise 
in the highest terms. It is with dili- 
gence and care that this department 
has been handled and The Signal's 
accounts prove the business manager's 
ability. The alumni editor has faith- 
fully fulfilled his duties in that rather 
difficult and unfruitful position. The 
competition and managing editors 
have had their share of the work, and 
their promptness in their departments 
deserves credit. To the other mem- 
bers of the board credit is also due, 
and the editor wishes to extend thanks 
to them in just that proportion, which 
their services merit. The competitors 
are worthy of mention and the editor 
wishes to thank faculty and alumni for 
their contributions. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in the 
Siohal Office or handed to E. M. Brown 1 1 , on or 
before the Saturday precedlnr each issue. J 



Mar. 



Mar. 



Mar. 



Mar. 



Mar. 



The Senior board of The Signal 
relinquishes its relations with the pres- 
ent issue and wishes to heartily con- 
gratulate the new board and welcome 
each member for his new duties. It 
is with a mixed feeling, a fee.ing both 
of reluctance and oleasure, that we 
lay aside our task. We feel that we j 
now better appreciate our capabilities | 
and because of our enjoyment in the 
work, hesitate to loosen our hold. 
But again we believe, as we lookback, 
there were times when better service 



7. — 6-45 p. m. Stockbridge 
Club in Agricultural Recitation 
Room. 

7-00 p. m. Glee Club Re- 
hearsal in Chapel. 
7-15 p. m. Junior Landscape 
Club in Wilder Hall. 

8. — 3-30 p. m. Assembly. Sec- 
ond Annual Debate. 
7-00 p. m. Debating Club in 
Public Speaking Room. 
7 00 p. m. Mandolin Club re- 
hearsal in Chapel. 
7-30 p. m. Lecture by J. H. 
Hale of South Glastonbury, 
Conn., "The Horticultural 
Awakening in New England" 
in Chapel. 

9—6-45 p. m. Y. M. C. A. in 
Chapel. 

11 — 3-00 p. m, Annual Indoor 
Track Meet. 

6-30 p. m. Social Union En- 
tertainment in Chapel, Parland 
Newhall Concert Company, 

12. — 5-00 p. m. Vespers. Rev. 
Herbert J. White. Hartford, 
Conn. 



SMOKER 

The smoker held Saturdey evening 
in the Drill Hall was Mogul Night in 
the annals of the Social Union. 
About 200 enjoyed the evening, and, 
incidentally, the cigarettes furnished 
by the New England agent of S. 
Anargyros. 

The festivities commenced at about 
seven o'clock, one-half of the floor 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



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CARPETS 



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It's a good thing not to have to worry 
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Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

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Prices $3. 50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94 4 



Clapp, '12. 



I leers, '12. 



We have a full line of Manners, 1'ost 
Cards, College Songs, Seal I'apers, Foun- 
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Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

HASKMKNT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Pellett, '13. 



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JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



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Amherst, Mass. 



*E. N. PARISEAU.j« 

HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 

RAZORS HONED 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Order* left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention 



being devoted to dancing while infor- 
mal cards held sway over the remain- 
ing half. At nine o'olock, Mr. Ches- 
ley, assisted by 1914, served everyone 
with a light collation consisting of 
sandwiches, crackers, cheese and 



A large number of M. A. C. bulle- 
tins have just been received at the 
President's office. They may be 
obtained for the asking. 

The basketball game between the 
Seniors of the Amherst high school I 
cocoa, following which the company ■ and lhe rest of the nigh school was; 
gradually dispersed. played ,„ , he Dr|H Ha|1 Tuesday 

In an announcement made during a ft ern0 on 
the evening the president of the Sen- 
ate expressed the hope that it will be 
oossible to hold more smoKers of this 

kind. These aliairs have done and 

representative of that firm distributing 
can do more toward fostering the old' 

6 cigarettes to the men. 

M. A. C. spirit than any other brancii 

The Junior Banquet will be held 

March 23, 191 1, at the Ten Eyck, 

Albany, New York. The committee 



The social union smoker held in the 
Drill Hall Saturday. March 4, was 
known as the "Mogul Smoker," a 



of college activities. 



SIGNAL FLECTION 

At a meeting of the new Signal 
Board Thursday, March 2, Alden 
Chase Brett 1912, of North Abington, 
was elected Editor-in-Chief of the Col- 
lege Signal for the coming year. He 
has been a member of the staff since 




in charge of arrangements is L. S. 
Caldwell, F. S. Madison and H. H. 
Wood. 

The Division of Agriculture has 
received from the National Dairy 
Show a diploma '"in recognition of 
superior merit" for an exhibit of cer- 
tified milk made in Chicago in 
December. 

S. S. Besser was elected manager 
of the Freshman track team last 
Wednesday at a meeting of the class. 
The dollar required from each member 
of ih-i class ior the Junior Banquet 
was also secured by Treasurer Gibson. 
••Jack'' Hessian, a noted marks- 
man, representing the Union Metallic 
Cartridge Company at the various 
shoots held in the country, was at M. 
A. C. Tuesday afternoon and Wed- 
Editor A. C. Brett nesday morning for the purpose of 

his freshman year and is thoroughly I 8 lVin g the team some "pointers" on 
conversant with its work. Brett has shooting 



had some editorial experience as he 
was Editor-in-Chief of the 1912 Index 
and the Signal is assured a successful 
year under his direction. 

At the same meeting Albert W. 
Dodge of Wenham was elected Busi- 
ness Manager, and George Zabriskie, 
2nd, of Rutherford, N. J., assistant 
business manager. That Mr. Dodge 
is comoetent for his position is assured 
by the success he made of managing 
his high school paper while preparing 
for college. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

interclass track meet Saturday. 

Candidates for the baseball team 
were to report for the first practice 
Saturday morning. 

The corrected list of the freshman 
class for the second semester shows a 
total of 130 members. 

Prof. F. A. Waugh gave a good live 
talk Friday evening to the young men's 
class at the First Congregational 



1013 1014 HOCKEY 

The Freshman-Sophomore hockey 
game was played on Pratt rink Wed- 
nesday afternoon. The result was a 
foregone conclusion and 1914 won 
easily by a score of 2-0. The game 
was very one-sided ; more so than the 
score indicates. The play was cen- 
tered about the Sophomore goal prac- 
tically all the time and only by putting up 
a strong defence were the Sophs able 
to keep the score down, Ellis making 
some phenomenal stops. 

For the Freshmen, Wooley, Cap- 
tain Jones and Hutchinson skated rings 
around the Sophs, while Nedham at 
coverpoint took care of the puck when- 



Z 



Balanced and Specialized Fertilizers 



Well-balanced, specialised fertilizers, containing the rig III aim units 
ot available nitrogen, la both chemical ,unl organic forms, with an excess 
oi soluble .md reverted phosphoric u id, both tor fertilizing and cstalyi 
inn sffects, and the propel amount and right form of potash, all thorough- 

lv blended together ami in tonus that will not c.ikr, but remain in ,t 
Tillable condition, and which will act not only in the beginning, I'll t 
throughout the season (fertilisers based upon the in e<ls of the crop and 
market requirement*), are what the practical t.ninei sbould rely upon in 
growing commercial crops Above all thing*, he should avoid un 
balanced and Impropei mixtures that have the defect ol one (dement 
being insolublr and another element too solublt for successful plant 
growth. Think of this when considering home mixing. 

It is much tin- same with modem feitili/cis as it is with modem 

medicine. As ft rule the best physicians do not send theii patients to a 

drag Store with prescriptions to be made up. They are prescribing mix 

tures already made up t<> certain known standards and formulas bj 
large manufacturing drug houses of whom there ate perhaps ■ dosen In 

the United States In this way they get thr drugs tbev want, the loi 
mulas they want and the conditions in which they want them. These 

formulas represent the crystallised experience <>f thousands ol 

physicians in dealing with many conditions. In critics! i sees physk ians 
do not put tlirir ti usts in prescriptions made up in small lots of uncertain 
chemicals by local druggists Can the fat nut afford to mix doses lot his 
crops even if he knows his Ingredient 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



In the afternoon, at 400, 
he gave an exhibition of shotgun and 
revolver shooting, back of the Drill 
Hall. Then he gave some practice 
on off-hand and prone shooting in try- 
ing out the four new rifles recently 
received at the armory. In the even- 
ing, he gave a discussion of rifle shoot- ! 
ing, and left Wednesday morning. 



I. Tfl. LABROVITZ 

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Leading Custom Tailor 

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Tel. 302 -4. 



toward the Sophomore end. made a 
pretty pass to Jones who shot the puck 
into the net for the final point. 

On account of time, the second 
period was shortened as in the first half 
the play was around the Sophomore 
goal, but a good defence prevented any 
scoring. Larsen, Greenleaf and Eilis 
excelled for the Sophs. The game, 
for a class affair, was unusually clean, 
there being no penalties imposed on 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 






Church - , . | ever it passed the center of the rink. I 

The musical association has elected z nn * nmn r* c «.. 

i Oniv once aid the bopnomores get 
P A Racicot '11 as its president., J , 

r. a. rcacicoi 1 » v shooting distance, and tney 

F. D. Griggs '13 was elected leader , tnnl , . . 

" ! found Higgins right on the job. 

of the Glee Club. The ^ score was madfi near , he 

Mr. A. W. Patch of Boston gave ^ q{ the Rf>| ha|f Hutchinson, by 
an interesting lecture on "The Com- ^ ^^ fejnt brought Ei | is away from 
mission Man's Side of the Fruit Busi- hjs ^j,^ and witn a back-handed 
ness," in the chapel Wednesday sho( caged the fjrst po|m Afewmin- 
evenlng. ' utes | aler Hutchinson carried the puck 



either side. 
The summary : 








1914. 




1913. 




Wooley. f 




f. Larsen. Greenleaf 




Jones, f 




f. Bradley 


H 


Hutchinson, f 




f. Brewer 


Stewart, f 




f. Little 




Needham, cp 




cp. Larsen. Whitney 




Ntssen. Brewer 


P 


p, Moir 




Higgins. * 




g. Ellis 





AMHERST BOOK STORE 



H. W. FIELD 

... FfcORIS* ... 



'10. — R. P.Armstrong has resigned 
his position at the Vermont Experi- 
ment station and left Feb. 25th for 
Porto Rico to take a position with La 
Isabella Citrus Fruit Company, address, 
La Isabella Grove, San Juan, P. R. 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 

OF'IV AfAIIIM V 09 Ml IIC, 

NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 7, 191 1 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 7, 191 1 



\\\v.'.'.-/.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.-.-.-,v.-.-.-.-/.-.'.-/.-.'.'.'.'/.-/.',v.-.'.'/.«^ 

GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 




AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



/afcyXV^xyagflftH^^ 



H. E. KINSMAN, 



I OR 12 YEARS OFFICIAL 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

AT WILLIAMS COLLEGE 

Has just opened an up-to-date and thoroughly equipped 
Studio for high grade work, in the 

NASH BLOCK, MAIM STREET, AMHERST 

Where absolute satisfaction is guaranteed every customer. 
All styles, up-to-date and prices reasonable. 



The place to have your group and single pictures taken correctly. Call 
and make your appointments. Visitors welcome. 



-STEAM FITTING. Telephone 59-4. 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



Specialty of Kepairing- 



( nuRCH Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 

i.kad Light*! &c. 

6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big. Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, - Mass. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DBlVTAt* ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amhkkst, Mass. 

Omci Hours: 
IMoIUA.M, I.IJOtoflU'.M. 



Ktlier and Nitrous Oxide (ias admin- 
stered when desired 



Olvmpia Gandv Co, 



257 Main St., 
Northampton. 



Mass 



ALLKINDSOF FANCY HOT 
AND COLD DRINKS AND 
HOME MADE CANDIES. 



SHORT POULTRY COURSE 
SCHEDULE 

Monday. March 6. 

8 15 Cliapel, "Poultry House Construe 

tion,'' Professor Graham. 
9-15 Ghem. Bid.. "Types and Breeds of 

Poultry," D. J Lambert. 
10-15 Chem. Bldg., "Small Fruit Growing 
for the Poultry Business, " Pro- 
fessor Sears. 
11-15 Chem. Bldg.. Conference hours on 
poultry matters. Professor Graham. 
1 30 Div. 1. Poultry House Construction. 
Div. 11 Incubation and Brooding. 
Ent Bldg., "Bee Keeping as an ad- 
junct of the Poultry Business." 
Dr. Burton N. Gates. 
Tuesday' March 7. 
8-15 Chapel. "Feeds for Growing and 

Fattening," Professor Graham 
9-15 Chem Bldg., 'Types and Breeds." 

Mr. Lambert. 
10-15 Veterinary B'.dg., Diseases of Poul- 
try." Dr. Paige. 
11-15 Chem Bldg.. Conference on Poultry 
Matters, Mr. Lambert. 
1-60 Animal Husbandry Bldg.. "Market- '\ 
ing Eggs, and Poultry," Professor, 
Graham. 

WeDNESDAY, March 8. 
8-15 Chapel. "Poultry Keeping in the 
Back Yard,.' Professor Graham. 

9 15 Chem Bldg., "Types and Breeds." 

Mr. Lambert. 
10-15 Chem. Bldg , "Keeping Poultry 

Accounts." Processor Foord. 
11 15 Chem. Bldg., "Conference on Poul- j 

try Matters," Professor Graham. 
1-30 Animal Husbandry Bldg.. M. A. C. | 

Poultry Show. Scoring and judg- ] 

ing birds, Mr. Lambert and class. 
7-00 Chapel, Regular weekly lecture on 

fruit growing. "Tne Horticultural 

Awakening in New England." J. 

H. Hale. South Glastonbury, Conn. 

THursDA^ , March 9. 

8-15 Chapel. "The Future for Poultry in 
Massachusetts, "Professor Graham. 

9-15 Chapel. 'Fitting Birds for Exhibi- 
tion." Mr. Lambert. 
10-! 5 Chem Bid . What Crops to grow for 
Feeding Poultry," Professor Hurd. 
11-15 Animal Husbandry Bldg., "The South 
Shore Soft Roaster Business." 
Henry Smith, Rockland, followed 
by demonstration of caponizing. 

7-30 Chapel. Meeting of local section of 
Ma:..;. Poultry Associat on, ad- 
dresses by Prof. F. H. Stoneburn. 
Conn. Agricultural College and 
Henry D. Smith. President Mass 
Poultry Association. 

FriDAY, March 10. 
8-15 Chem. Bldg., "Raising Poultry other 

:han Chicken." Mr. Lambert. 
9-15 Clark Hall, Stereopticon Lecture, 

Professor Graham. 
10-15 Clark Hall, "The Vegetable Crop on 

the Poultry Farm," Mr. Heller. 
1-30 Animal Husbandry Bldg .The M.A.C. 

Show. Scoring and judging under 

the direction of Mr. Lambert. 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUB STORE. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty <>f College Classes. 



ioz Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



Wright & Ditson 

Headquarters 
for 

Athletic Supplies 

"/,"„„„ College Students 
and Athletes who 
ft! k ,.„. want the real, su- Jtt 

FfeWSport. p ef | 0r aft j c | es for 

the various sports^ t { ^y 
should insist upon"" 
those bearing the 
Wright & Ditson 
Trade Mark 

Catalogue Free 

Wright & Ditson 

334 Washington St. 
Boston 

New York Chicago 

San Francisco 
Providence Cambridge 



IW. ■. e»T. or. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

ZOOLOGY. 

The Z ological museum is rapidly 
getting into shape. The Thayer col- 
lection of birdskins is now on exhibi- 
tion in the gallery of the museum. 
This collection contains a large num- 
ber of warblers. The collection of 
mammal skins, including skulls, pre- 
sented by J. A. Hyslop, has been 
unpacked and will prove very useful 
for class wotk. 

entomology. 

Dr. Gates appeared before the Leg- 
islative Committee on Ways and 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. W. Hlaney, Ti, 
C. S. C. House. 

Agent for Pressing, E. L. Winn, 87 
Pleasant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursdays, 
Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Means in support of the apiary Inspec- 
tion work of the state. 

W. E. Dickinson, class of 1907, 
has sent to the Department, from 
Hawaii, a fine specimen of Mantis. 



"■ ' _^L„-1- ■■, ■ " - 




Buy your flowers of the floricul 
tural department. The new green 
houses are now producing first class I f Illinois. 



LANDSCAPE GARDEN1NC 

The exhibition in Wilder Hall this 
week consists of a fine set of drawings 
loaned by Louis Brandt '10, and 
made by his students in the University 
They show examples of 



RATI MA 



material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



the work done in the required course 
for sophomores in the School of Agri- 
culture. The work is interesting also 
for having been done under the direc- 
tion of one of our M. A. C. men. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only J rom 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Great River Water Power Co. 

E. A. &* S. A. ALLEN* Prwfg. 

Office, Gillett Block. 

WESTFIED, MASS. 



ROOMS WITH HEAT, 
POWER <* LIGHT 

F*0 » R R IV T 



BALED SHAVINGS 

put up in attractive shape, 

in car lots. 

PRICE ON APPLICATION 



FRANK S. O'BRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND HACK 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 



8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, - - MASS. 

Telephone 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'81. — Prof. H. E. Chapin D. Sc, 
of the Eastern District High School 
(Brooklyn), president of the Brooklyn 
Institute department of Botany, ad- 
dressed a well attended meeting of his 
department, recently. He lectured 
on "Our Common Ferns," showing 
first modes reproduction and then tak- 
ing up the study of thirty species and 
lllustrat ng a sufficient number ot each 
to Indicate its peculiarities, closing 
with a reference to fossil ft- rns. 

'99._Dr. B. H. Smith, Director 
of the United States pure food labora- 
tory, made a hit the other evening 
before a Boston audience in an address < 
on the adulteration of pure food stuffs. 
The doctor is able to appreciate the 
humor unconsciously displayed by 
some whose efforts have made fly 
poison so weak as to prevent the death 
of flies, and food so poisonous as to kill 
them. 

•06.— H. B. Filer is the author of 
a three-page article illustrated with 
several half-tones, on Buffalo's Snade 
Tree Department in a recent issue of 
the Municipal Journal. 

'06. — Stanley S. Rogers is the 
author of Bulletin No. 208 from Cali- 
fornia Experiment Station on the 
"Late Leaf Blight of Celery." 

'06. — Richard Wellington is doing 
graduate work at the Bussey labora- 
tories, in the agricultural department 
of Harvard University, at West 
Roxbury. 

'07. — E. G. Bartlett expects to 
leave Honolulu for this country May 
31 for a three months vacation, and 
will be in Amherst for commencement. 

'08.— Mr. and Mrs. Carlton Bates 
attended the Prom as a part of their 
honeymoon trip. 

'08.— Born Sunday Feb. 5, to Mr. 
and Mrs, L. A. Shattuck a son, Leroy 
Altus Shattuck, Jr. 

'10.— H. A. Brooks, Engineer, 
Public Service. 1 182 Broad St., New- ! 
ark, N. J. 

'10.— W. M. S. Titus of New 
Braintres spent a few days visiting, 
his friends here at college last week. 

'10. S. W. Mendum is teaching 

agriculture and mathematics in Derry \ 
Village, N. H. 



;. 



- 










'•':': 






With each package of 

I atima you get a pen- 
nant c.ivpon, 25 of 

II !i.. h MOM a hand- 
some felt college 

p vrn ;t (12x32)— 

ftbslitu 0/ 100, 












TURKISH 

BLEND 

CIGARETTES 



MINING 



A good prospect is cocn 
discovered to be a rtclifnd 
if you start smoking Fa- 
timas. When assayed Ll.r, 
reveal only rare toba cos 
blended to produce a dis- 
tinctly "different" taste. 
Come fellows, get rich quick, 
dig up some silver 
buy gold, for Fatimas are 
nuggets of intrinsic value. 
And their goodness is sui 
prising. 

They cost only 1 5 cents 
for 20. which gives you 1 
additional. 
THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 



% 



■ 






': 



J 



Orchards Pay Better Than (iold Mines When Fertilized With 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 

The MuMU I. iist-lts State Hoard of Agriculture < itten-,1 ., I'r iz.- for the Most Profitable Aneol 
Massachusetts (ln.li.inls. I hi* Contest Has Recently rinsed, and the 

PRIZF. IS WON HY I Ml l>Wt ;w MUNSON FRUIT CO., of Littleton, Mas*. 

■if I'n/e Winning A 'twill Apples 

OAVE THP.M A TOTAL RETURN OF $7I3.70-THH NET PROFIT WA« »SI9.SS 



Hft?iKB8 R «iVSIBWE THOfllflS PHOSPHITE POWDEHV 



icwoI.BS PEK ACRE 



ill living Letter l-iom Barnes Brothers, the famous Kruit 'irowerS and < »k hardmts o( 
Valesville, < onn.. Shows That Thomas Phosphate Powder Brings a Pri/e to 
Every fser in the Form of a Profitable Crop : 



III! I Ol M'P TIMKR C'OMfANV, 

Gent ton 

In regard to Thomas Phosphate Powder. 

von will re< all that we bought of you last year 

i we wish to s.iy that it gave us most 

txcelUnt rtftUts. (in our peach orchard where 

we us»d it. the trees made a splendid growth 

with heavy dark green foliage, the fruit was of 

W, and the keeptng\</ualities nrre re 



maikable. which was a big advantage, especial 
ly when we had over \V> cars to harvest in about 
two weeks as we had this year 

Wt never saw better colored Baldwin Apple \ 
than those we grew when we applied a good 
dressing of Thomas Phosphate Powder The 
best sold at retail for >Q.oo per barrel. 



Vours truly, 

Barni s Bki 



I II HIS. 



THERE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS POR YOU I 

The whole story is told in the New Edition of our Booklet, t'p To Date 
Fruit Growing," which is sent free if you mention Tall Coil Ml SfOMAl* 

The Coe-Mortimer C©M«roRT&a 24-26 Stone St., N. Y. City 

We also distribute from Boston, Mass.; Belfast, Maine: Bai.timoki, 
Mi).; Phila.. Pa ; Noiifolk, Va.; Savannah, Ga.; Charlston, S ' 









The College Signal, Tuesday, March 7, 191 



Pi. J. Lapone, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



BUT 0— LIVEBY— H B S E 



Tel. ,8j. 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 

Ward** Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Knvelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kngraved I nvita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
lianquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 
X\Tr* rr l > c 57«3 Franklin Street, 
TT Oil! d BOSTON. 



DUDLEY 

OUTFITTKR IN 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 

We clothe the best ISase Hall Teams 
in America. We make the "Dudley" 
Superior Shaker Sweaters which are 
to day the Standard Sweaters of the 
world. We specialize in Complete 
College and Professional Team Kquip- 
ment. Uniforms, Base Balls, Bats, 
Shoes, etc, etc. Special Quotations 
to Clubs and Team Managers. 

Write for cataloge. 



THE 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers a thorough training in agricultural 
vocations that are not yet overcrowded, 
and in which there are constantly increas- 
ing opportunities for employment. 

NECESSARY EXPENSES MODERATE 

LOCATION OF COLLEGE IDEAL 

ATTENDANCE RAPIDLY INCREASING 

For complete catalog or specific informati- 
on, write to 



KENYON L. BUTTERRIELD, President 

AMHERST, MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Nineteen Hundred and Thirteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society, 

Public Speaking Council, 



H. W. Blaney, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. W. Piper, Manager 

G P. Nickerson, Manager 

j. M. Heald, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. G. Anderson, Manager 

R. W. Wales, President 

I. W. Davis, President 

H. C, Walker, Manager 

N. H. Hill, President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

J. E. Dudley, Jr., President 

R. C. Barrows, President 

I. C. Gllgore, President 



Charles H. Dudley 



HANOVKk, 



N. H. 



BASSALOTTI & GENTASO 

FRUIT, 

CONFECTIONERY, 
SODA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

HK1CKS TO TAKE HOME. 

CORNER AMITY & PLEASANT STREETS 

JOHN WOJTASZCZYK 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON Of CUTLER 



Boot & Shoes Repaired 

FIRST CLASS WORK 

Amherst, - Mass. 

BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 




THE H. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



STAMFORD, CONN. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424- 1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

UN IFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 

R C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 

COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. K. Roberts. 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Can at Reasonable Rate* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Springfield Republican 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

THE NEWSPAPER 

That SATISFIES The College Man 



An editorial page of national in- 
fluence. 

All the news, general and local, 
including special correspondence from 
Amherst and the colleges. 

A first-class sporting page. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, $2. Weekly, %i. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



era 



Vol. XXI. 



ft <* P 

3. a. 



iSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, March 14, 1911. 



No. a 1 



n 
orq 



ANOTHER VICTS 



Rifle Team 



Wins from Lou. 
Default. 



by 



FARMERS' WEEK 



The Rifle Team in their match 
against Louisiana this week turned 
what may be regarded as ihe best 
score they have registered this season. 
The total of the standing position was 
rather low at 901 but they cleared up 
their prone targets with 45 points under 
possible or 955, making a total of 1856 
for the match. While this is not as 
high as the score against Columbia it 
shows the best team work of the 
season. There were only ten points 
separating the high and low man and 
although there were not the usual num- 
ber of high scores turned in not a man 
shot below 180. Raclcot was high 
man this week with a total of 191. 



Sharpe 

Racicot 

Murray 

Lloyd 

McLaughlin 

Baker 

McDougal 

Edmlnster 

Wilde 

Brett 



O.H. 

88 
96 
90 
89 
91 
88 
88 
92 
87 
92 



96 
95 
92 
94 
97 
93 
98 
96 
99 
95 



TOTAL. 

184 

191 

182 

183 

188 

181 

186 

188 

186 

187 



901 955 1856 
The results for the week just ended 
follow: 

Columbia defeated Purdue, 1897 to 
1734. 

Cornell defeated North Georgia agri- 
cultural college, 1802 to 1653. 

Dartmouth defeated New Hamp- 
shire, 1737 to 1700. 

University of Missouri defeated 
Princeton, 1745 to 1651. 

Iowa defeated Minnesota, 1867 to 
1744. 

Washington State defeated Univer- 
sity of Arizona, 1799 to 1760. 

Massachusetts Agricultural won from 
Louisiana State University by default, 

1857. 

Rhode Island state won from Cali- 
fornia by default, 1669. 



At a meeting of the class of 1913, 
Thursday night, it was voted to change 
the Sophomore-Senior Prom in June 
from a formal affair to an informal 
"Hop" with white flannels In order 
Instead of full dress. The following 
men were elected to the Hop commit- 
tee : O. G. Anderson, N. R.Clark 
and B. A. Harris. This election 
completes the committee which already 
consisted of H. T. Rohrs (charman), 
C. A. Shute, G. Zabriskie, 2d, and S. 
M. Jordan. 



Large Attendance at Opening Meeting 
in Chapel Last Evening. 

Last evening, the Farmers' Week 
was formally opened in the chapel with 
addresses by President K. L. Butter- 
field and Hon. George S. Ladd of 
Sturbrldge. President Butterfield 
gave an address of welcome and Mr. 
Ladd spoke on "What the college has 
done and is doing for the farmers. 
During the day, those who came for 
the course registered at the office of 
the Director of Extension Work in 
South College, and were assigned 
rooms. 

Farmers' Week Is a course of lect- 
ures given annually for the benefit of 
those who can not leave their work to 
take other courses. The course is 
given under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of Short Courses. The lectures 
began this morning and will continue 
until Friday noon. The program is 
divided Into three sections; one on 
general agriculture and dairying; a 
second on horticulture and forestry; 
and a third section for women. 

Today the section on general agri- 
culture was addressed as follows; Prof. 
Haskell, on "Home grown protein" ; 
Dr. W. E. Taylor of Moline, III. on 
"Some problems In maintaining soil 
fertility"; Professor Hurd, on "Potato 
Growing" ; and Professor McLalne, 
who gave a demonstration of stock 
Judging and scoring. The section on 
horticulture had the following program : 
"Garden Designs," Professor Waugh ; 
"Trees and Shrubs for home use," 
Professor White; "Hardy Annuals 
and Perennials." Mr. E. J. Canning 
of Northampton; a lecture and practi- 
cal demonstration of Pruning by Mr. 
Norman ; and an apple judging contest 
open to those not registered as regular 
students. The Women's section was 
addressed by Dr. Chamberlain, on the 
"Chemistry of foods and nutrition"; 
and by Miss Shapleigh of Columbia 
University. In the afternoon Miss 
Shapleigh gave a demonstrationoi cook- 
ing. This evening there will be 
a concert by the M. A. C. orchestra, 
followed by addresses by Hon. J. 
Lewis Ellsworth, Sec'y Mass. Board 
of Agriculture and Dr. H. J. Webber 
of Cornell University. 

A fine program is planned for the 
rest of the week. Tomorrow will be 
"Dairy Day" for the section on gen- 



ANNUAL DEBATE 

Team to Debate Against Bates Picked 
in Second Annual Contest. 



TRACK MEET 



The Second Annual Debate was 
held at Assembly last Wednesday. 
The program was a brilliant fight on 
the part of every man for a place on 
the college debating team. The plat- 
form was appropriately decorated with 
palms and flowering plants. The two 
teams were seated opposite each 
other while in the middle of the plat- 
form sat the timekeepers, Bernard 
Ostrolenk and Lawrence W. Burby, 
the vice-president of the Public Speak- 
ing Council, P. A. Racicot, and the 
presiding officer, Hon. Frank A. Hos- 
mer. Mr. Racicot Introduced the 
chairman who made a neat little 
speech before opening the program. 
He then called for the first speaker of 
the affirmative, Irwin C. Gilgore 191 1. 
Mr. Gllgore opened the debate on the 
question, "Resolved, that the Repub- 
lican party is entitled to popular sup- 
port because of its history and princi- 
ples, He was followed by J. Dudley 
French 1913, who outlined the argu- 
ment of the negative that the party 
was not serving the interests of the 
people. He showed that the party 
was lined up with the trusts and bosses. 
The third speaker, T.J. Moreau 1912, 
defended with vigor the Payne-Aldrlch 
tariff and showed that the party was 
progressive. The next speaker, T. J. 
Godvin 1913. attacked this position 
with force and enthusiasm and adduced 
figures to prove that the revision of 
the tariff was upward. The last 
speaker of the affirmative was Thomas 
Hemenway 1912, who showed that the 
Republican party had kept Its platform 
pledges made in 1908. J. M. Heald 
1912 the last speaker for the negative 
discussed ship subsidy, Canadian rec- 
iprocity, the postal rate bill, the direct 
election of senators and other measures 
to show the party's weakness. 

Every speaker was loudly applauded 
when he closed his constructive speech, 
but the work of the rebuttals showed 
the ability of the contestants to even 
better advantage. The characteristi- 
cally snappy and rapid-fire rebuttal of 
Gllgore set the audience In an uproar 
of laughter and applause and undoubt- 
edly won him first place from the 
judges. Then followed French and 
Moreau with strong speeches. God- 
vin 's unique way of meeting the tariff 



[Continued 00 pat* 2] 



Sophomores Win Handily with 3* 
Points. Juniors Second. 

The annual Indoor meet was held In 
the Drill Hall Saturday afternoon, the 
sophomores winning handily with a 
total of thirty six points. The juniors 
came in for second with twenty-three 
points to their credit. The freshmen 
took third with fourteen points and the 
seniors managed to secure a total of 
eight. The sophomores captured 
points in every event except the one 
thousand yard run. 

The Indoor meet was the second of 
a series of three Interclass contests, 
the first being the cross country run 
which was held In the fall, and the last 
being the out door meet which will be 
run off later In the spring. The class 
with the highest total score in the three 
contests will earn the right to have 
Its numerals engraved on a cup that Is 
placed In the throphy room. 

In the cross-county run held last 
November, the juniors were first with 
twelve points, the sophomores second 
with seven points and the freshmen 
third with three points. So that, as 
a result of Saturday's meet, the sopho- 
mores are in the lead with 43 points, 
the Juniors second with thirty-five, the 
freshmen third with seventeen and the 
seniors last with eight. When II 
comes to a show down In the spring It 
looks as If the juniors and sophomores 
would be most directly In line for first 

honors. 

No one smashed any college rec- 
ords Saturday, but, at the same 
time, there was plenty of evidence of 
good track material and some of the 
outdoor events were won very prettily. 
In the thousand yard run, Tower took 
the lead ftom the start and finished 
first followed by Bodfish a close sec- 
ond. Lucas was hard pushed by Gib- 
son and Greenleaf and fnlshed a bare 
third. Time, two minutes, thirty-four 
and one fifth seconds. 

The six hundred yard run was any 
body's race. Barrows, the captain of 
the track team, jumped Into the lead 
closely trailed by Clapp and Whitney. 
After a number of laps Clapp in at- 
tempting to get the lead, accidentally 
ran against Barrows so that the latter 
fell. Before he could get to his feet 
Clapp was ahead with Whitney second. 
Near the end of the last lap Barrows 
jostled Clapp who was still leading so 



[Continued on par* 21 



(Continued oa pace 2 1 



INFORMAL MARCH 18 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 14, 1911, 



The College Signal. Tuesday, March 14. »9" 



FARMERS' WEEK 

[Continued from page 1] 



eral agriculture and also "Apple Day" 
for the horticultural section. In the 
afternoon the ladies of the faculty will 
give a reception to all "Farmers' 
Week" people, in French Hall. 
Thursday will be "Corn Day," with a 
corn judging contest in the afternoon. 
Friday is to be devoted to lectures and 
Round Table Discussions on the 
Building of the Rural Community. 
In addition to the regular members of 
the Faculty, the following speakers will 
be present to take part In the program 
at various times; Mr. Charles J. Rob- 
inson; Mr. Elmer D. Howe of Marl- 
boro ; Professor J. M. Trueman of 
Storrs, Conn,; Mr. P. M. Harwood, 
Agent of the Dairy Bureau ; Prof. C. 
S. Wilson of Cornell. Prof. F. W. 
Taylor of Durham, N. H.; Miss 
Frances Stern of Mass. Institute Tech- 
nology, and Miss Helen Louise John- 
son of Springfield. 

Exhibits of fruit, spraying and prun- 
ing appliances, etc. will be in Wilder 
Hall; of corn, In the Animal Hus- 
bandry Building ; of milk and dairy 
products In the basement of South 
College ; and of household conven- 
iences, with demonstrators In attend- 
ance, in the Entomology Building. 



ANNUAL DEBATE 

[Continued from paee 1 J 



arguments and his humorous references 
to Bodjohn and "Hinky Dink" met 
the hearty approval of the audience 
and did not a little to land him a place 
on the team. The work of Heald and 
Hemenway in closing the debate was 
highly creditable to both. 

So close was the contest for places 
that the judges were In conference over 
a half hour. They finally chose J. D. 
French as alternate and I. C. Gllgore, 
T. J. Godvin and T. J. Moreau for the 
team. The three men will each 
receive the new gold medals first 
given last year and $10 in money. 
The judges were Prof. John Corsa, 
Rev. James M. Lent and Prof. Fred- 
eric B. Loomis of Amherst. 

The team will make the trip to Lew- 
Iston, Me., to debate Bates college. 
May 19ih next, on the income tax 
question. Professor McKay is enthu- 
siastic over the outlcok for a M. A. C. 
victory on that date. 



TRACK MEET 

(Continued from page t .] 



a quarter of a lap behind Caldwell, al- 
lowing Moir only third. The time was 
rather slow. 

No body had anything on Neilson 
in the twenty-five yard dash and he 
finished first with Nicolet second and 
Larsen third. The time in the final 
was three and four-fifths seconds, but 
the best time was three and three- 
fifths made fn one of the semi-finals. 

Samson didn't have to exert him- 
self to throw the sixteen pound shot 
thirty-eight and a half feet for first 
place. Lloyd took second with thirty- 
four and nine-tenths feet and Griggs 
third with thirty-four and six tenths. 
Lloyd's place was contested on the 
ground that Griggs made the second 
longest throw In the semi-finals. The 
high jump went to Huntington who 
cleared five feet and who could easily 
have gone higher had he been pushed 
for the place. The best that Pills- 
bury and Needham could do was to 
split second honors at four feet ten. 
Walker won the rope climb with Shaw 
second and Drury third. Time In the 
finals, six and two-fifths seconds. 
Walker's best time was in the prelim- 
inaries, six seconds. 

The relay race went to the sopho- 
mores with the freshmen second and 
the juniors tail-enders. The seniors 
were not represented. Walker, Dodge, 
Noyes and Gallagher ran for the jun- 
iors; for the sophomores, G. E. 
Howe Whitney, Caldwell and Gore; 
for the treshmen, Nicolet, Wheeler, 
Allen and Besser. Nicolet, took the 
lead for the freshmen at the start and 
finished about a third of a lap to the 
good. Whitney cut down the fresh- 
men lead and Caldwell forged ahead 
of his man with ease. Tha freshmen 
were about ten yards behind at the 
finish, the juniors in the neighborhood 
of a lap. Time, three minutes, 
twenty-four seconds. 

The pursuit race between the sopho- 
mores and freshman went to the sopho- 
mores, but the freshmen made them 
travel fast for it. 

The officers of the meet were : Ref- 
eree, Prof. Clarence E. Gordon; clerk 
of course, George H. Chapman; 
starter, Dr. Percy L. Reynolds; 
judges, Prof. S. Francis Howard, 
John N. Summers, Joseph H. Merrill; 
timers, John Noyes, Samuel S. Cross- 
man ; scorer, L. S. Dickinson ; meas- 
urers, Sumner C. Brooks, Frank L. 
Thomas. 



that both fell and Whitney was first to 
hit the tape, with Barrows second and 
Clapp behind. Time, one minute, 
twenty-five and three-fifths seconds. 

Caldwell had no difficulty to finish 
first in the mile. He took the lead 
at the start and was not passed. With 
four or five laps to go, Moir his team 
mate, sprinted and ran abreast with 
the intention of blocking the track. 
But Moir coulden't stand the pace and 
Shaylor was able to pass him In the 
middle of the last lap and finished a 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

At the last meeting ot the Stock- 
bridge Club, the subject of Floricul- 
ture was taken up. Patch ' 1 1 read a 
very interesting paper on the market- 
ing of flowers, This was followed by 
an open discussion of the subject. 
Next Tuesday night there will be a 
short business meeting at 6-45, after 
which the members will go to the 
chapel to hear Dr. H. J. Webber of 
Cornell University, who will give an 
illustrated stereopticon lecture, on 
"The Improvement of Crops by Selec- 



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tlon and Breeding." 

The week following March 21, the 
subject will be "The Management of 
Farm Woodlands." Several papers 
will be given on this subject, and the 
last fifteen minutes of the hour will be 
taken up with the discussion of timely 
hints, that Is, hints as to what work a 
farmer would be doing at that time of 
year. 



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SHORT POULTRY COURSE 

The short poultry course started 
Monday. Feb. 27, and continued 
until last Friday night. There were 
about 90 people in attendance at the 
course, and much of profit was gained 
from the lectures and demonstrations. 
Prof. J. C. Graham, the head of the 
newly created department of poultry 
husbandry had the supervision of much 
of the course. Other men who lec- 
tured during the course were E. F. 
Gaskell. Dr. J. B. Paige, Prof. J. B. 
McLean, C. Jewett, Dr. B. N. Gates, 
Prof. W. D. Hurd, Prof. F. C. Sears, 
J. H. Robinson of Boston, Dr. P. T. 
Woods of Danvers. Prof. J. E. Rice 
of Cornell University, C. S Heller 
and H. P. Hlnkley of Springfield. 
Most of the lectures and demon- 
strations were given in the room on 
the third floor of the chemical labora- 
tory, although the chapel, the new 
entmological building. Wilder Hail 
and the new animal husbandry building 
were used in some cases. As much 
ground was covered as was possible in 
the restricted number of lectures, and 
among other things, it was shown that 
various kinds of business other than 
the poultry business might be used as 
an adjunct to it. A very practical 
course was given In poultry-house con- 
struction. On Saturday, the last day 
of the course, the morning was spent 
in making a visit to a poultry plant. 




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The Fall Styles are ready 
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TENNIS OUTLOOK 

The call for candidates for the ten- 
nis team has been made and indoor 
practice has begun In the Drill Hall. 
Of the old men, Capt. Johnson Ml, 
Lin M2, and Rochrs M3 are available 
and from all indications are fully up to 
their old form. As yet only seven 
new men have reported, but among 
this number there is some very promis- 
ing material. The candidates up to 
the pr-sent time are 1911, Johnson, 
Nickerson; 1912, Brett, Lin, Hemen- 
way, Phllbrick; 1913, Rochrs; 1914, 
Damon, Earle, Foster. Manager 
Heald has arranged an admirable 
schedule subject to the approval of the 
athletic board. The first match will 
probably be played during the week of 
April 19th During the fall season It 
was seen that the present system of 
courts was Inadequate to accomodate 
the increased number of students, nor 
were those In use in good enough con- 
dition for Intercollegiate matches. It 
Is hoped that with the opening of the 
spring season these conditions will be 
remedied, both by the Improve- 
ment of the old courts and by the 
building of at least two first-class new 
courts for team use exclusively. 



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The College Signal, Tuesday, March 14, 191 1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOAKD OF EDITORS. 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912. Editor-in-Chief 

MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. AMltUnt Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER. JR.. 1912. Muutinc Editor. 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912, Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW, 1912, Athletics. 

SILAS WILLIAMS. 1912. Department Note*. 

OSCAR C. ANDERSON. 1913. Alumni Notet. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURC. 1913. College Notes. 
S. MILLER JORDAN. 1913. College Notes. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Business Manager. 
GEORGE ZABRISKIE. 1913 Asst. Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CLARK. JR.. 1 914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914, Circulation. 
STUART B. FOSTER. 1914, Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodgb. 



Entered ss second-class matter at the Amherst 
Office. 



Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, MARCH 14. No. 21 



Plenty of time left to fill out an 
order for the Informal next Saturday. 



How about the tennis team? The 
call for candidates was made more 
than a week ago and as yet only seven 
new men have reported to Captain 
Johnson for practice. Surely there is 
more available material than this. As 
the first match is scheduled for the 
week of April 19th, the team must be 
developed almost wholly by indoor 
practice. Come out, and help make 
this season as successful as that of last 
year. 



Without doubt every man living In 
North and South Dormitories has, at 
some time, had forced upon him a 
realization of the inadequacy of the 
lighting systems of the halls and base- 
ments of these buildings after mid- 
night. This condition is inconvenient 
to say the least, and under certain cir- 
cumstances may be positively danger- 
ous. It would seem that the benefit 
to the men would justify the small 
expense necessary to maintain these 
few lights on the all-night circuit. 



With this issue the new Signal 
Board takes up the work where it was 
laid down by the retiring members. 
We can not commend to the readers 
too highly the work of the retiring 
board. The editor-in-chief and busi- 
ness manager deserve especial credit 
for the manner in which they have 
handled their respective departments ; 
the one, for giving us a clear cut, 
unprejudiced view of college condi- 
tions, and the other for a management 
of the business end which has effect- 
ively done away with any fears that 
"Massachusetts" is not capable of 
supporting a weekly. 

For the coming year the paper will 
be carried on along lines similar to 
those followed In the past. The aim 
of the board is to issue a well-balanced 



publication of interest to both student 
and alumnus. The Signal is, and 
should be essentially a newspaper. To 
this end, however, we must have the 
co-operation of both students and 
alumni. Let us appeal especially to 
the latter. If you would have a live 
alumni section, do your share by send- 
ing all news of Interest directly to the 
alumni editor. The Signal will en- 
deavor to be independent and fair, and 
to hit straight from the shoulder when 
necessary. Criticism is welcome. If 
anything seems to be wrong, don't te I 
others, they may not have noticed It, 
come directly to us. In this way only, 
can we hope to turn out the best pos- 
sible work. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notices for this column should be dropped In the 
Signal Office or hsndedlto M. C. Prstt 12, on or 
before the Saturday preceding each Issue. J 

March 14. — 6-45 p. m., Stockbrldge 
Club In Agricultural Recitation 
Room. 

6-45 p. m., Glee Club Re- 
hearsal in Chapel. 

March 15. — 3-30 p. m., Assembly, 
Prof. Henry B. Wright, Yale 
University. 

March 16—6-45 p. m., Y. M. C. A. 
In Chapel. 

March 17.— 4-00 p. m., Glee Club 

Rehearsal in Chapel. 
March 18. — 4-00 p. m., Informal in 

Drill Hall. 

March 19. — 5-00 p. m.. Vespers, 
Rev. O. P. Glfford. Brookline. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

The next appearance of the "Pri- 
vate Secretary" will be at Ware, 
April llth. 

Rev. Herbert J. White of Hartford, 
Conn, spoke on "True Religion" at 
Sunday vespers. 

The Sophomores have re-elected 
last year's Sing committee with the 
addition of J. D French. 

Lawrence A. Bevan, who recently 
entered the Sophomore class from 
M. I. T., has pledged himself to Sigma 
Tau Delta. 

Spring is, at last, upon us. A 
group of grave and reverend Seniors 
were discovered pitching pennies 
against old South and according to 
tradition, this makes the beginning of 
spring. 

Saturday night's Social Union en- 
tertainment given by the Parland- 
Newhall Concert Company in the 
Chapel was characterized by many as 

the "best of its kind that has ever 
appeared here." 

At a meeting of the Dramatic soci- 
ety, Tuesday night, John E. Dudley, 
Jr., resigned from the presidency and 
Vice-President W. J. Btrdsall was 
elected to fill the office for the remain- 
der of the term. 

At the annual election of theY.M.C. 
A. .Thursday evening, F.S.Madison '12 
was elected president ; G. A. Post '13, 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



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Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
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The College Signal. Tuesday, March 14. »9"- 



vice-president ; J. W. T. Lesure '13, 
secretary; L. N. Pease '^.treas- 
urer; W. A. Davis '14. correspond- 
ing secretary. 

A class day election of the Senior 
class made on Wednesday are as 
follows : class oration, H. W. Blaney; 
campus oration, I. C. Gilgore ; pipe 
oration, C. A.Smith; hatchet oration, 
A. P. Bursley; ivy poem, A. H. 
Sharpe ; class ode, H. F. Willard. 

The C. S. C. Fraternity held a 




E. M. BROWN. Retiring Editor-in-Chief 

smoker at their house on Pleasant 
Street last Friday evening. Several 
members of each of the other frater- 
nities were guests, and spent a very 
enjoyable evening playing cards and 
singing. Light refreshments were 
served. 



JUNIOR AGRICULTURE PRIZE 

The Macmillan Company has again 
offered a set of the Cyclopedia of 
American Agriculture, complete In 
four volumes, for the best essay upon 
any subject included in the work of the 
Division of Agriculture. Competition 
is open to members of the Junior class. 
The Macmillan Comwany has asked 
that the essays be judged by a com- 
mittee of the Faculty and Experiment 
Station staff before being forwarded to 
them for final decision.